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Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila

Bio: Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Genius & Paganism. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 5 publications receiving 79 citations.

Papers
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MonographDOI
17 Apr 2018
TL;DR: In this article, Hameen-Anttila analyzed the lost sixth-century history of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsi's Shāhnāme.
Abstract: In Khwadāynāmag. The Middle Persian Book of Kings Jaakko Hameen-Anttila analyses the lost sixth-century historiographical work of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsī's Shāhnāme .

33 citations

Book
31 Dec 2002

23 citations

MonographDOI
29 May 2006
TL;DR: The first analysis in any language of the religious, philosophical and folkloristic content of Ibn Wahshiyya's (d. 931) Nabatean Agriculture is presented in this article.
Abstract: This is the first analysis in any language of the religious, philosophical and folkloristic content of Ibn Wahshiyya's (d. 931) Nabatean Agriculture. This enigmatic book, said to have been translated by Ibn Wahshiyya from Syriac into Arabic, contains much material on Late Antique Paganism in Iraq and semi-learned reception of Greek philosophical thought. The first part of the present book studies the question of authenticity, authorship and context of the Nabatean Agriculture, dated by the author to around 600 AD. The second part consists of 61 translated and annotated excerpts of the Nabatean Agriculture, until now available only in the Arabic original, as well as introductions to the world view of the text.

22 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The author can be perceived as a historical individual, a singular genius, or a gifted anthologist; he can claim authority or pass it on to others as discussed by the authors, or he can be invisible, applying textual strategies for steering the reader's perception and interpretation, trying to leave the reader oblivious to his authorial interference.
Abstract: The objective of the contributions presented in this volume is the investigation of authorship in pre-modern Arabic texts. From several angles and different perspectives it has been asked how the author in his various facets and aspects, and as a principle of organization and guidance, can be traced and understood. The author can be perceived as a historical individual, a singular genius, or a gifted anthologist; he can claim authority or pass it on to others. The author can be invisible, applying textual strategies for steering the reader’s perception and interpretation, trying to leave the reader oblivious to his authorial interference. Although authors can be proud to present their knowledge and their opinions, they can also be reluctant to show themselves and can even disclaim their responsibility, depending on the issue at hand. The contributions gathered in this volume provide a fresh view on the multilayered nature of authorial functions and open up new perspectives on our understanding of the rich and diverse pre-modern Arabic culture and literature.

1 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
06 Oct 2018
TL;DR: DNA barcode analysis supports the separation of these taxa at a subspecies level, and recognizing the formal nomenclature of C. sativa and C. indica, and genetic drift in this population likely initiated allopatric differences between European Cannabis sativa (cannabidiol [CBD]] and Asian Cannabis indica (THC>CBD).
Abstract: New concepts are reviewed in Cannabis systematics, including phylogenetics and nomenclature. The family Cannabaceae now includes Cannabis, Humulus, and eight genera formerly in the Celtida...

146 citations

Book
30 Dec 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a survey of the most relevant articles from the past and present years of the Anales archéologiques arabes syriennes (Damascus), ADAJ Annual of the Department of Antiquities of Jordan (Amman), AJA American Journal of Archaeology (New York), BAAL Bulletin darcheologie et d’architecture libanaise (Beirut), Bibliothèque archéologicique et historique (Paris, France), BAR IS British Archaeological Reports International Series (Oxford
Abstract: AAAS Annales archéologiques arabes syriennes (Damascus) ADAJ Annual of the Department of Antiquities of Jordan (Amman) AJA American Journal of Archaeology (New York) BAAL Bulletin d’archeologie et d’architecture libanaise (Beirut) BAH Bibliothèque archéologique et historique (Paris–Beirut) BAR IS British Archaeological Reports International Series (Oxford) BASOR Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research in Jerusalem and Baghdad (Ann Arbor, MI–New Haven, CT) BCH Bulletin de correspondance hellénique (Paris) CRAI Comptes rendus de l’Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres (Paris) IEJ Israel Exploration Journal (Jerusalem) JRA Journal of Roman Archaeology (Ann Arbor, MI–Portsmouth, RI) JRS Journal of Roman Studies (London) MEFRA Mélanges d’archéologie et d’histoire de l’École française de Rome. Antiquité (Rome) PAM Polish Archaeology in the Mediterranean (Warsaw) PEQ Palestine Exploration Quarterly (London) ZPE Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik (Bonn)

74 citations

01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: The presence of scholars from Egypt and Syro-Anatolia in the service of the Neo-Assyrian kings was highlighted in this article, where the authors highlight the importance of the scholars from both countries.
Abstract: The article highlights the presence of scholars from Egypt and Syro-Anatolia in the service of the Neo-Assyrian kings.

68 citations

Book
14 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of the evidence for the early Christian faith and its early Christian rhetoric, including the so-called "evidence" from ancient Near Eastern data.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. The ancient Near Eastern data 3. The so-called 'evidence' 4. Herodotos 5. In the footsteps of Herodotos: Lucian and 'Jeremiah' 6. Pindar Fragment 122 7. Strabo, confused and misunderstood 8. Klearkhos, Justinus, and Valerius Maximus 9. Archaeological 'evidence' from Italy 10. The early Christian rhetoric 11. Last myths.

58 citations