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Jacquelyne Marie Luce

Bio: Jacquelyne Marie Luce is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Kinship & Queer. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 5 citations.
Topics: Kinship, Queer, Lesbian, Queer theory

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors draw on three narratives from a Canadian research project on LGBTQ people and fertility clinics to illustrate how LGBTQ bodies, identities and family configurations are frequently misidentified.
Abstract: This article draws on three narratives from a Canadian research project on LGBTQ people and fertility clinics to illustrate how LGBTQ bodies, identities and family configurations are frequently mis...

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The metastory of the postpartum experiences of nonbirth lesbian mothers revealed 6 themes including the following: At the mercy of health care providers, Nursing is the major difference between us, Defined by who I am not, Fighting for every piece of motherhood, and Epilogue: The new normal.
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to develop a metastory of nonbiological lesbian mothers' postpartum experiences utilizing Riessman's structural approach to thematic analysis. Ten nonbirth lesbian mothers were interviewed. Each shared a unique story of her first year of motherhood. Themes were individually analyzed within each story. The metastory of the postpartum experiences of nonbirth lesbian mothers revealed 6 themes including the following: At the mercy of health care providers, Nursing is the major difference between us, Defined by who I am not, Fighting for every piece of motherhood: The world can take them away, What's in a name?, and Epilogue: The new normal.

18 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This article looks at the choices and experiences of ten BC queer couples’ births, early in the twenty-first century, and gives an overview of three different types of births, from totally medical to totally natural, all the while recognizing that most families chose to experience something in between.
Abstract: Based on the research from my Master’s thesis, this article looks at the choices and experiences of ten BC queer couples’ births, early in the twenty-first century. It situates their births in a social context of some of the most queer-family-friendly policies in the world, as well as in a place where midwives have been able to practice legally throughout the province since 1998. I give an overview of three different types of births, from totally medical to totally natural, all the while recognizing that most families chose to experience something in between. In the end, it becomes clear that while I am talking about queer couples, there is nothing essentialist or universal about their choices or experiences. Instead, they offer insight into the everyday experiences, challenges, and choices facing most childbearing couples in British Columbia.

1 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: Nora as mentioned in this paper was a 29 year old woman, living in a small northern Canadian city, who had tried to get pregnant before and was still hoping to, but had decided to put the plans to become pregnant on hold.
Abstract: In 1999 I interviewed a 29 year old woman, Nora, in a small northern Canadian city about her thoughts, plans and expectations about getting pregnant. Although she had tried to get pregnant before and was still hoping to, she had gone back to university and had decided to put the plans to become pregnant on hold. During the conversation, I mentioned an article that had recently appeared in the New Yorker magazine (Mead 1999) reporting that women were being paid U.S. $15,000-$20,000 to “donate” their eggs for fertility purposes. Nora looked at me, questioningly: “$15,000-$20,000?” “That was a high amount,” I replied. She nodded, “Hmm. It sounds too good to be true.“ I described the content of the article a bit more, as well as the advertisement that had inspired it. Nora reflected: But, I mean, the donor ... I mean it’s, if she wants to, it’s her responsibility to be responsible to know what’s happening to her body. But if somebody is looking for a donor, there’s nothing wrong with that. But is education provided out there? Or are resources out there for women to research them? Because, if somebody put in an ad and I saw the ad, and, you know, $20,000 ... Yeah, I’d want to do it. But I’d also want to check, have the resources to look into it. What’s going to happen to my body taking fertility [drugs]? How do I match my cycles to the other person’s cycle? And how much damage are they going to do to my body when they do surgery? And do I have to go for the surgery, or ...?