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Jacques Brazeau

Bio: Jacques Brazeau is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Social change & Language policy. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 109 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors test several hypotheses about the impact of intergerational class mobility on political party preferences and show that a high degree of demographic identity influences newcomers more than a class with low demographic identity does and that the more left-wing inflow there is into a class, the more likely the immobile members are to have leftwing political preferences.
Abstract: The authors test several hypotheses about the impact of intergerational class mobility on political party preferences. Test using cross-national data sets representing Britain, the Netherlands, Germany, and the United States over the period 1964-90 suggest a process of acculturation to the class of destination. The authors hypothesized that a class with a high degree of demographic identity influences newcomers more than a class with low demographic identity does and that, the more left-wing inflow there is into a class, the more likely the immobile members are to have left-wing political preferences. The data did not confirm these hypotheses. A macro analysis does, however, show that the level of class voting is weakened by a compositional mobility effect.

136 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relationship between class mobility and job mobility is investigated using retrospective career history data from the Federal Republic of Germany, and it is shown that class mobility is distinct processes, each yielding a different view of the opportunity structure of Germany.
Abstract: The relationship between class mobility and job mobility is investigated using retrospective career history data from the Federal Republic of Germany. Although few sociological theories speak directly to this problem, many current ideas imply expected patterns. Among these we explore theories of class reproduction, work degradation, bureaucracy, industrial segmentation and the life course. The findings show that class mobility and job mobility are distinct processes, each yielding a different view of the opportunity structure of Germany. Moreover, the dynamic perspective suggests that cross-sectional analyses of mobility give a misleading view of work trajectories. We also find strong effects of industrial sector, firm size, education and class background.

126 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The transformation of metropolitan governance cannot be understood without adopting a double reading frame referring on the one hand to the actual content of policies aimed at the metropolitan scale, their raison d'etre, the macroeconomic logics that underlie them, and on the other hand, the configurations of actors and institutions which evolved strongly in the last 20 years as mentioned in this paper.

73 citations

Book
29 Mar 2004
TL;DR: This paper examined the interlinked history of Parisian speech and the Parisian population through these various phases of in-migration, dialect-mixing and social stratification from medieval times to the present day.
Abstract: Paris mushroomed in the thirteenth century to become the largest city in the Western world, largely through in-migration from rural areas. The resulting dialect-mixture led to the formation of new, specifically urban modes of speech. From the time of the Renaissance social stratification became sharper as the elites distanced themselves from the Parisian 'Cockney' of the masses. Nineteenth-century urbanisation transformed the situation yet again with the arrival of huge numbers of immigrants from far-flung corners of France, levelling dialect-differences and exposing ever larger sections of the population to standardising influences. At the same time, a working-class vernacular emerged which was distinguished from the upper-class standard not only in grammar and pronunciation but most markedly in vocabulary (slang). This book examines the interlinked history of Parisian speech and the Parisian population through these various phases of in-migration, dialect-mixing and social stratification from medieval times to the present day.

67 citations