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James G. Quintiere

Bio: James G. Quintiere is an academic researcher from University of Maryland, College Park. The author has contributed to research in topics: Flame spread & Combustion. The author has an hindex of 44, co-authored 176 publications receiving 7623 citations. Previous affiliations of James G. Quintiere include Princeton University & United States Department of Commerce.


Papers
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BookDOI
28 Sep 1999
TL;DR: The Enclosure Fire Dynamics as mentioned in this paper provides a complete description of enclosure fires and how the outbreak of a fire in a compartment causes changes in the environment, and provides a clear presentation of the dominant mechanisms controlling enclosure fires.
Abstract: Enclosure Fire Dynamics provides a complete description of enclosure fires and how the outbreak of a fire in a compartment causes changes in the environment. The authors-both internationally renowned experts in fire safety and protection engineering-offer a clear presentation of the dominant mechanisms controlling enclosure fires and develop simple analytical relationships useful in designing buildings for fire safety. They show readers how to derive engineering equations from first principles, stating the assumptions clearly and showing how the resulting equations compare to experimental data. The details and the approach offered by this text provide readers with a confidence in and the applicability of a wide range of commonly used engineering equations and models. Enclosure Fire Dynamics will enhance the knowledge of professional fire protection engineers, researchers, and investigators and help build a strong foundation for engineering students.

822 citations

Book
21 Apr 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an overview of the history of fire and its application in the field of fire safety, including a discussion of the role of mass and energy conservation in chemical reactions.
Abstract: Preface. Nomenclature. 1 Introduction to Fire. 1.1 Fire in History. 1.2 Fire and Science. 1.3 Fire Safety and Research in the Twentieth Century. 1.4 Outlook for the Future. 1.5 Introduction to This Book. 2 Thermochemistry. 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 Chemical Reactions. 2.3 Gas Mixture. 2.4 Conservation Laws for Systems. 2.5 Heat of Formation. 2.6 Application of Mass and Energy Conservation in Chemical Reactions. 2.7 Combustion Products in Fire. 3 Conservation Laws for Control Volumes. 3.1 Introduction. 3.2 The Reynolds Transport Theorem. 3.3 Relationship between a Control Volume and System Volume. 3.4 Conservation of Mass. 3.5 Conservation of Mass for a Reacting Species. 3.6 Conservation of Momentum. 3.7 Conservation of Energy for a Control Volume. 4 Premixed Flames. 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 Reaction Rate. 4.3 Autoignition. 4.4 Piloted Ignition. 4.5 Flame Speed, Su. 4.6 Quenching Diameter. 4.7 Flammability Limits. 4.8 Empirical Relationships for the Lower Flammability Limit. 4.9 A Quantitative Analysis of Ignition, Propagation and Extinction. 5 Spontaneous Ignition. 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 Theory of Spontaneous Ignition. 5.3 Experimental Methods. 5.4 Time for Spontaneous Ignition. 6 Ignition of Liquids. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Flashpoint. 6.3 Dynamics of Evaporation. 6.4 Clausius-Clapeyron Equation. 6.5 Evaporation Rates. 7 Ignition of Solids. 7.1 Introduction. 7.2 Estimate of Ignition Time Components. 7.3 Pure Conduction Model for Ignition. 7.4 Heat Flux in Fire. 7.5 Ignition in Thermally Thin Solids. 7.6 Ignition of a Thermally Thick Solid. 7.7 Ignition Properties of Common Materials. 8 Fire Spread on Surfaces and Through Solid Media. 8.1 Introduction. 8.2 Surface Flame Spread - The Thermally Thin Case. 8.3 Transient Effects. 8.4 Surface Flame Spread for a Thermally Thick Solid. 8.5 Experimental Considerations for Solid Surface Spread. 8.6 Some Fundamental Results for Surface Spread. 8.7 Examples of Other Flame Spread Conditions. 9 Burning Rate. 9.1 Introduction. 9.2 Diffusive Burning of Liquid Fuels. 9.3 Diffusion Flame Variables. 9.4 Convective Burning for Specific Flow Conditions. 9.5 Radiation Effects on Burning. 9.6 Property Values for Burning Rate Calculations. 9.7 Suppression and Extinction of Burning. 9.8 The Burning Rate of Complex Materials. 9.9 Control Volume Alternative to the Theory of Diffusive Burning. 9.10 General Considerations for Extinction Based on Kinetics. 9.10.1 A demonstration of the similarity of extinction in premixed and diffusion flames. 9.11 Applications to Extinction for Diffusive Burning. 10 Fire Plumes. 10.1 Introduction. 10.2 Buoyant Plumes. 10.3 Combusting Plumes. 10.4 Finite Real Fire Effects. 10.5 Transient Aspects of Fire Plumes. 10.5.1 Starting plume. 10.5.2 Fireball or thermal. 11 Compartment Fires. 11.1 Introduction. 11.2 Fluid Dynamics. 11.3 Heat Transfer. 11.4 Fuel Behavior. 11.5 Zone Modeling and Conservation Equations. 11.6 Correlations. 11.7 Semenov Diagrams, Flashover and Instabilities. 12 Scaling and Dimensionless Groups. 12.1 Introduction. 12.2 Approaches for Establishing Dimensionless Groups. 12.3 Dimensionless Groups from the Conservation Equations. 12.4 Examples of Specific Correlations. 12.5 Scale Modeling. Appendix. Flammability Properties. Archibald Tewarson. Index.

599 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The principles for scaling fire phenomena from the dimensionless groups derived from the governing differential equations are examined in this paper, and a review of the literature shows examples of where correlations have been successfully developed for a wide range of fire phenomena in terms of the significant dimensionless group.

377 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a simple procedure is presented for estimating room temperature and the likelihood of the occurrence of flashover in an enclosure and the engineer can use the results for quantitative estimations of the effects of building design and fire load on the tendency for flashover as defined by a temperature limit.
Abstract: A simple procedure is presented for estimating room temperature and the likelihood of the occurrence of flashover in an enclosure. The engineer can use the results for quantitative estimations of the effects of building design and fire load, on the tendency for flashover as defined by a temperature limit.

318 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the state of the art in modeling chemical and physical processes of wood and biomass pyrolysis is reported, and the main achievements of numerical simulations are discussed.

1,495 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide guidance in the use and interpretation of cone calorimetry for those directly involved with such measurements, and discuss the fire scenario with respect to applied heat flux, length scale, temperature, ventilation, anaerobic pyrolysis and set-up represented by the cone.
Abstract: There is little consensus within the fire science community on interpretation of cone calorimeter data, but there is a significant need to screen new flammability modified materials using the cone calorimeter. This article is the result of several discussions aiming to provide guidance in the use and interpretation of cone calorimetry for those directly involved with such measurements. This guidance is essentially empirical, and is not intended to replace the comprehensive scientific studies that already exist. The guidance discusses the fire scenario with respect to applied heat flux, length scale, temperature, ventilation, anaerobic pyrolysis and set-up represented by the cone calorimeter. The fire properties measured in the cone calorimeter are discussed, including heat release rate and its peak, the mass loss and char yield, effective heat of combustion and combustion efficiency, time to ignition and CO and smoke production together with deduced quantities such as FIGRA and MARHE. Special comments are made on the use of the cone calorimeter relating to sample thickness, textiles, foams and intumescent materials, and the distance of the cone heater from the sample surface. Finally, the relationship between cone calorimetry data and other tests is discussed. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

1,116 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
27 Feb 2003-Nature
TL;DR: The current state of tropical fire science is discussed, recommendations for advancement are made and pan-tropical forest fires will increase as more damaged, less fire-resistant, forests cover the landscape.
Abstract: Forest fires are growing in size and frequency across the tropics. Continually eroding fragmented forest edges, they are unintended ecological disturbances that transcend deforestation to degrade vast regions of standing forest, diminishing ecosystem services and the economic potential of these natural resources. Affecting the health of millions, net forest fire emissions may have released carbon equivalent to 41% of worldwide fossil fuel use in 1997-98. Episodically more severe during El Nino events, pan-tropical forest fires will increase as more damaged, less fire-resistant, forests cover the landscape. Here I discuss the current state of tropical fire science and make recommendations for advancement.

1,003 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explain why heat release rate is, in fact, the single most important variable in characterizing the "flammability" of products and their consequent fire hazard.

781 citations