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James G. Randall

Bio: James G. Randall is an academic researcher from University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. The author has contributed to research in topics: Military operations other than war & Asymmetric warfare. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 22 publications receiving 447 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1937

144 citations

Book
01 Jan 1926

92 citations

Book
01 Jan 1944
TL;DR: The second volume examines Lincoln as a person -his conversation, his personality, his daily tasks, his marriage, his sense of humour - and covers from the period of the Emancipation Proclamation up to the triumph of the Appomattox and his untimely death as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: This work was first published in four volumes in 1945, 1952, and 1955, and is reprinted here in two. The second volume examines Lincoln as a person - his conversation, his personality, his daily tasks, his marriage, his sense of humour - and covers from the period of the Emancipation Proclamation up to the triumph of the Appomattox and his untimely death.

32 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Shotts et al. developed an informational theory that analyzes conditions under which a reelection-seeking executive will act in the public interest, considering factors such as executive competence, challenger quality, and the likelihood that voters will learn the consequences of policy decisions before an upcoming election.
Abstract: We develop an informational theory that analyzes conditions under which a reelection-seeking executive will act in the public interest. The theory considers factors such as executive competence, challenger quality, and the likelihood that voters will learn the consequences of policy decisions before an upcoming election. We ...nd that an executive who has information suggesting that a popular policy is contrary to voters’ interests may or may not pander to voters by choosing it; under certain conditions, the executive can actually increase his probability of reelection by choosing an unpopular policy that is in the public interest. However, we also show that an executive will sometimes face electoral incentives to enact a policy that is both unpopular and contrary to voters’ interests. We illustrate our model with examples involving President Abraham Lincoln, California Governor Earl Warren, and President Gerald Ford. ¤For helpful comments we thank Steve Ansolabehere, David Austen-Smith, Dan Carpenter, Cary Covington, Patricia Conley, Daniel Diermeier, Tim Fedderson, Fred Greenstein, Keith Krehbiel, Dan Kryder, Jim Snyder, Craig Volden, and seminar participants at Berkeley, Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT, Northwestern, NYU Law School, Princeton, Stanford, and SUNY Stony Brook. yAssistant Professor of Political Science, MIT. zAssistant Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University. xCorresponding author. Assistant Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University, 601 University Place, Evanston IL 60208-1006. Email: k-shotts@nwu.edu. Phone: (847) 491-2628. Fax: (847) 491-8985. “There are some who would be inclined to regard the servile pliancy of the Executive to a prevailing current...as its best recommendation. But such men entertain very crude notions, as well of the purposes for which government was instituted, as of the true means by which the public happiness may be promoted...When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests.” Alexander Hamilton, Federalist Paper 71

442 citations

Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: A comparative performance analysis of artificial Neural networks, MDA and chance showed that artificial neural networks predict better in both training and testing phases, and are promising as an alternative to traditional analytic tools like MDA.
Abstract: Stimulated by recent high-profile incidents, concerns about business ethics have increased over the last decade. In response, research has focused on developing theoretical and empirical frameworks to understand ethical decision making. So far, empirical studies have used traditional quantitative tools, such as regression or multiple discriminant analysis (MDA), in ethics research. More advanced tools are needed. In this exploratory research, a new approach to classifying, categorizing and analyzing ethical decision situations is presented. A comparative performance analysis of artificial neural networks, MDA and chance showed that artificial neural networks predict better in both training and testing phases. While some limitations of this approach were noted, in the field of business ethics, such networks are promising as an alternative to traditional analytic tools like MDA.

217 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: We are right to see power, prestige, and confidence as conditioned by the Civil War, and it is to our credit that we survived the War and tempered our national fiber in the process, but human decency and the future security of our country demand that we look at the costs as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: We are right to see power, prestige, and confidence as conditioned by the Civil War. But it is a very easy step to regard the War, therefore, as a jolly piece of luck only slightly disguised, part of our divinely instituted success story, and to think, in some shadowy corner of the mind, of the dead at Gettysburg as a small price to pay for the development of a really satisfactory and cheap compact car with decent pick-up and road-holding capability. It is to our credit that we survived the War and tempered our national fiber in the process, but human decency and the future security of our country demand that we look at the costs. What are some of the costs? Robert Penn Warren, The Legacy of the Civil War (New York: Random House, 1961), pp. 49–50.

133 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the Court's relation to patterns of partisan change to show that the traditional philosophic concern with the counter-majoritarian nature of judicial review is largely divorced from empirical reality and has relevance only during periods of partisan realignment within the political system as a whole.
Abstract: Several years ago Professor Robert Dahl argued that the traditional concern over the Supreme Court's power of judicial review was largely unfounded. Dahl demonstrated that seldom, if ever, had the Court been successful in blocking the will of a law-making majority. This paper argues that, had Dahl considered his data from a different perspective, he would have discovered that, by virtue of the recruitment process, the Court will rarely even attempt to thwart a law-making majority. Examining Dahl's data in the context of the Survey Research Center's election classification scheme, the paper focuses on the Court's relation to patterns of partisan change to show that the traditional philosophic concern with the counter-majoritarian nature of judicial review is largely divorced from empirical reality and has relevance only during periods of partisan realignment within the political system as a whole. The paper buttresses the argument that the Court's “yea-saying” power is more important than its “nay-saying” power, a realization which can serve as the premise from which a logically consistent justification of the Court's power of judicial review may be dialectically constructed.

131 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: A LONELY WANDERING as mentioned in this paperUGEE: DISPLACED WHITES IN THE TRANSMISSIPPI WEST DURING THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR, 1861-1868 as mentioned in this paper
Abstract: A LONELY WANDERING REFUGEE”: DISPLACED WHITES IN THE TRANSMISSISSIPPI WEST DURING THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR, 1861-1868

95 citations