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James Howard-Johnston

Bio: James Howard-Johnston is an academic researcher from University of Oxford. The author has contributed to research in topics: Late Antiquity & Armenian. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 23 publications receiving 580 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The History attributed to Sebeos is one of the major works of early Armenian historiography as mentioned in this paper, which traces the fortunes of Armenia in the sixth and seventh centuries within the broader framework of the Byzantine-Sasanian conflict.
Abstract: The History attributed to Sebeos is one of the major works of early Armenian historiography. Although anonymous, it was written in the middle of the seventh century, a time when comparable chronicles in Greek and Syriac are sparse. Sebeos traces the fortunes of Armenia in the sixth and seventh centuries within the broader framework of the Byzantine-Sasanian conflict. Comprising two volumes, part 1 (240 pages) is the translation and notes followed by part 2 (216 pages) which contains the historical commentary, this excellent publication will be of interest to all those involved in the study of Armenia, the Caucasus, the Eastern Roman Empire and the Middle East in late antiquity. It will be of particular value to Islamicists, since Sebeos not only sets the scene for the coming of Islam, but provides the only substantial non-Muslim account of the initial period of expansion.

200 citations

MonographDOI
10 Jun 2010

126 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: In this article, the origins of the Carolingian Attempt to Regulate the Cult of Saints are discussed and the Holy Man and the transformation of political space in MEDIEVAL RUS' 10.
Abstract: 1. INTRODUCTION 2. On Defining the Holy Man 3. Asceticism and Paideia: Time for Another Function? 4. 'FOR NEXT TO GOD, YOU ARE MY SALVATION': REFLECTIONS ON THE RISE OF THE HOLY MAN IN LATE ANTIQUITY 5. 'What we heard in the Lives of the Saints we have Seen with Our Own Eyes': The Holy Man as Literary Text in Tenth-Century Constantinople 6. DE-MYSTIFYING THE ROLE OF SANCTITY IN WESTERN CHRISTENDOM 7. The Origins of the Carolingian Attempt to Regulate the Cult of Saints 8. The Missionary Life 9. HOLY MEN AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF POLITICAL SPACE IN MEDIEVAL RUS' 10. The Holy Man and Christianization from the Apocryphal Apostles to St Stephen of Perm 11. PROPHECY AND HOLY MEN IN EARLY ISLAM 12. The Etiquette of Devotion in the Islamic Cult of Saints

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Rome's eastern defences were re-modelled and extended from the 3rd c. A.D. to cope with the enhanced power of Persia under the Sassanian dynasty as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Rome’s eastern defences were re-modelled and extended from the 3rd c. to cope with the enhanced power of Persia under the Sassanian dynasty. There were four main phases of development—under the Tetrarchate, in the 4th, early 6th and later 6th c. A.D. The defensive system was well adapted to the terrain, with several distinct components: fortified cities, fortresses, forts, fortified highland redoubts, defended passes, support and lateral roads. A marked shift of attention north of the Armenian Taurus and an increasing reliance on Bedouin clients in the south characterised the final phase.

50 citations

Book
10 Jun 2010
TL;DR: The Middle East in the 7th century: Arab Conquests as discussed by the authors The Middle-Earthe-Century: The Great Powers, Arabia, and the Prophet 15.
Abstract: 1. George of Pisidia 2. Two Universal Chronicles 3. Seventh-Century Eastern Sources I: The History of Khosrov 4. Seventh-Century Eastern Sources II: The History to the Year 682 and the Khuzistan Chronicle 5. Supplementary Roman Sources of the Seventh Century I 6. Supplementary Roman Sources of the Seventh Century II 7. Later Historians: The West Syrian Tradition 8. Later Historians: Nicephorus 9. Later Historians: Theophanes 10. Later Historians at Work in Egypt, Iraq, and Iran 11. Early Islamic Historical Writing 12. The Life of the Prophet 13. Historians of the Middle East in the Seventh Century 14. The Middle East in the Seventh Century: The Great Powers, Arabia, and the Prophet 15. The Middle East in the Seventh Century: Arab Conquests 16. The Middle East in the Seventh Century: A New World Order Conclusion

43 citations


Cited by
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BookDOI
30 Jan 2009

287 citations

Book
21 Jul 2016
TL;DR: The authors explored the nexus of art, personal piety, and self-representation in the last centuries of Byzantium, focusing on the evidence of verse inscriptions, or epigrams, on works of art.
Abstract: This book explores the nexus of art, personal piety, and self-representation in the last centuries of Byzantium. Spanning the period from around 1100 to around 1450, it focuses upon the evidence of verse inscriptions, or epigrams, on works of art. Epigrammatic poetry, Professor Drpic argues, constitutes a critical - if largely neglected - source for reconstructing aesthetic and socio-cultural discourses that informed the making, use, and perception of art in the Byzantine world. Bringing together art-historical and literary modes of analysis, the book examines epigrams and other related texts alongside an array of objects, including icons, reliquaries, ecclesiastical textiles, mosaics, and entire church buildings. By attending to such diverse topics as devotional self-fashioning, the aesthetics of adornment, sacred giving, and the erotics of the icon, this study offers a penetrating and highly original account of Byzantine art and its place in Byzantine society and religious life.

204 citations

BookDOI
30 Nov 2007
TL;DR: Achaean League, 274,275, 278, 280, 280 as discussed by the authors, 384, 386 Acanthus/Acanthians, 224 Achaean league.
Abstract: nouns, 53 Academy (Plato’s), 70, 108, 112, 118, 135, 360, 384, 386, 390 Academy (Isocrates’), 384, 386 Acanthus/Acanthians, 224 Achaean League, 274–275, 278, 280

167 citations

Dissertation
06 Dec 2017
TL;DR: Les protectores diuini lateris Augusti, soldats de haut rang attestes dans l’armee romaine entre le IIIe siecle and le VIe Siecle, ont ete consideres tour a tour par les historiens comme des gardes du corps imperiaux, des officiers d’etat-major, ou les successeurs des centurions as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Les protectores diuini lateris Augusti, soldats de haut rang attestes dans l’armee romaine entre le IIIe siecle et le VIe siecle, ont ete consideres tour a tour par les historiens comme des gardes du corps imperiaux, des officiers d’etat-major, ou les successeurs des centurions. Mais ces interpretations soulevent bien des contradictions que cette etude d’histoire militaire et sociale, appuyee sur un corpus prosopographique, vise a resoudre. Les evolutions du recrutement, des carrieres et des fonctions des protectores sont revelatrices des recompositions du commandement de l’armee romaine tardive. L’analyse ouvre egalement une fenetre sur l’environnement social et culturel de ces soldats privilegies, amenes a frequenter tant les champs de bataille que la cour imperiale. Enfin, en placant au centre de la reflexion la relation de ces soldats avec l’empereur, a la fois chef de l’armee et garant de l’ordre social et symbolique du monde de l’Antiquite tardive, on comprend comment les protectores s’inscrivaient, aux yeux des Romains, au sein d’un ordre terrestre des dignites refletant la hierarchie celeste.

166 citations

Book
23 Nov 2017
TL;DR: Brooks Hedstrom as discussed by the authors traces how scholars identified a space or site as monastic within the Egyptian landscape and how such identifications impacted perceptions of monasticism, and provides an ecohistory of Egypt's tripartite landscape to offer a reorientation of the perception of the physical landscape.
Abstract: Darlene L. Brooks Hedstrom offers a new history of the field of Egyptian monastic archaeology. It is the first study in English to trace how scholars identified a space or site as monastic within the Egyptian landscape and how such identifications impacted perceptions of monasticism. Brooks Hedstrom then provides an ecohistory of Egypt's tripartite landscape to offer a reorientation of the perception of the physical landscape. She analyzes late-antique documentary evidence, early monastic literature, and ecclesiastical history before turning to the extensive archaeological evidence of Christian monastic settlements. In doing so, she illustrates the stark differences between idealized monastic landscape and the actual monastic landscape that was urbanized through monastic constructions. Drawing upon critical theories in landscape studies, materiality and phenomenology, Brooks Hedstrom looks at domestic settlements of non-monastic and monastic settlements to posit what features makes monastic settlements unique, thus offering a new history of monasticism in Egypt.

164 citations