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James Mooney

Bio: James Mooney is an academic researcher from Bureau of American Ethnology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cherokee & Dance. The author has an hindex of 17, co-authored 37 publications receiving 1221 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1896
TL;DR: DeMallie and Neihardt as mentioned in this paper described the Ghost Dance among the Sioux, the fears it raised of an Indian outbreak, and the military occupation of the Sioux reservations culminating in the tragedy at Wounded Knee.
Abstract: Responding to the rapid spread of the Ghost Dance among tribes of the western United States in the early 1890s, James Mooney set out to describe and understand the phenomenon. He visited Wovoka, the Ghost Dance prophet, at his home in Nevada and traced the progress of the Ghost Dance from place to place, describing the ritual and recording the distinctive song lyrics of seven separate tribes. His classic work (first published in 1896 and here reprinted in its entirety for the first time) includes succinct cultural and historical introductions to each of those tribal groups and depicts the Ghost Dance among the Sioux, the fears it raised of an Indian outbreak, and the military occupation of the Sioux reservations culminating in the tragedy at Wounded Knee. Seeking to demonstrate that the Ghost Dance was a legitimate religious movement, Mooney prefaced his study with a historical survey of comparable millenarian movements among other American Indian groups. In addition to his work on the Ghost Dance, James Mooney is best remembered for his extraordinarily detailed studies of the Cherokee Indians of the Southeast and the Kiowa and other tribes of the southern plains, and for his advocacy of American Indian religious freedom. Raymond J. DeMallie, director of the American Indian Studies Research Institute and a professor of anthropology at Indiana University, has edited James R. Walker's Lakota Society (1982) andThe Sixth Grandfather: Black Elk's Teachings Given to John G. Neihardt (1984), both published by the University of Nebraska Press.

193 citations

Book
01 Jan 1900

151 citations

Book
01 Jan 1898

82 citations


Cited by
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Book
28 Mar 1999
TL;DR: Rappaport as mentioned in this paper argues that religion is central to the continuing evolution of life, although it has been been displaced from its original position of intellectual authority by the rise of modern science.
Abstract: Roy Rappaport argues that religion is central to the continuing evolution of life, although it has been been displaced from its original position of intellectual authority by the rise of modern science. His book, which could be construed as in some degree religious as well as about religion, insists that religion can and must be reconciled with science. Combining adaptive and cognitive approaches to the study of humankind, he mounts a comprehensive analysis of religion's evolutionary significance, seeing it as co-extensive with the invention of language and hence of culture as we know it. At the same time he assembles the fullest study yet of religion's main component, ritual, which constructs the conceptions which we take to be religious and has been central in the making of humanity's adaptation. The text amounts to a manual for effective ritual, illustrated by examples drawn from anthropology, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and elsewhere.

1,062 citations

Book
21 Feb 1991
TL;DR: No other work provides such an exhaustive and wide-ranging account of modern human origins on a world-wide scale and is the only book which integrates the remarkable new genetic evidence with the more conventional approaches of archaeologists and anthropologists.
Abstract: This major interdisciplinary work developed from an international conference held at Cambridge University in 1987. Fifty-five of the world's leading authorities from the fields of anthropology, archaeology, human evolution, and genetics met for the first time to discuss all aspects of the biological and behavioural origins of modern human populations. The volume brings together their papers, revised and updated in the light of discussion at the conference itself.The book features the results of new work by geneticists working on mitochondrial DNA, globin polymorphisms, and a Y-chromosome DNA phylogeny, and there are general reviews of the genetic evidence for the evolution of modern humans. Other topics covered include palaeoecological models of human origins; sophisticated modeling of population expansions and replacements; changes in technology, subsistence and social patterns; and the origins of human language and other unique aspects of human behaviour. This is the only book which integrates the remarkable new genetic evidence with the more conventional approaches of archaeologists and anthropologists. No other work provides such an exhaustive and wide-ranging account of modern human origins on a world-wide scale.

669 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that studying culture within a unifying evolutionary framework has the potential to integrate a number of separate disciplines within the social sciences and to borrow further methods and hypotheses from biology.
Abstract: We suggest that human culture exhibits key Darwinian evolutionary properties, and argue that the structure of a science of cultural evolution should share fundamental features with the structure of the science of biological evolution. This latter claim is tested by outlining the methods and approaches employed by the principal subdisciplines of evolutionary biology and assessing whether there is an existing or potential corresponding approach to the study of cultural evolution. Existing approaches within anthropology and archaeology demonstrate a good match with the macroevolutionary methods of systematics, paleobiology, and biogeography, whereas mathematical models derived from population genetics have been successfully developed to study cultural microevolution. Much potential exists for experimental simulations and field studies of cultural microevolution, where there are opportunities to borrow further methods and hypotheses from biology. Potential also exists for the cultural equivalent of molecular genetics in "social cognitive neuroscience," although many fundamental issues have yet to be resolved. It is argued that studying culture within a unifying evolutionary framework has the potential to integrate a number of separate disciplines within the social sciences.

621 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1953-Ecology
TL;DR: There is a popular belief that the discoverers of eastern North America found everywhere an unbroken forest of giant trees, and the vast, virgin forest recurs constantly in the works of Parkman.
Abstract: There is a popular belief that the discoverers of eastern North America found everywhere an unbroken forest of giant trees. This belief has had much support from our popular literature. In the backdrop for The Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers, "The woods against a stormy sky their giant branches tossed" (Hemans 1826). America's fireside poet made us aware that, "This is the forest primeval" (Longfellow 1847). It has been said that a squirrel might have gone from Maine to Louisiana by leaping "from one giant tree to the next" (Bear 1951) ; might have travelled from bough to bough for a thousand miles without seeing a flicker of sunshine on the ground (Adams 1935) ; might indeed have travelled a squirrel's lifetime without coming down out of the white pines (Peattie 1950). The vast, virgin forest recurs constantly in the works of Parkman (1909 a, b). He pictures for us "One vast, continuous forest . . . the depths of immemorial forests, dim and silent as a cavern." He paints Verrazzano off the New England coast surveying "the shadows and gloom of mighty forests." Between the French and English colonies lay "a broad tract of wilderness, shaggy with primeval woods." There was Maine, a "waste of savage vegetation"; the White Mountains "throned in savage solitude"; the Adirondacks, a "mountain wilderness"; Lake George lying in the "wild charm of untrodden mountains and virgin forests." Frontenac's army approached Onondaga "among the dense columns of the primeval forest," and across Pennsylvania "a prodigious forest vegetation . . . wrapped

389 citations