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James Sperling

Bio: James Sperling is an academic researcher from University of Akron. The author has contributed to research in topics: European union & International security. The author has an hindex of 18, co-authored 78 publications receiving 1041 citations. Previous affiliations of James Sperling include University of California & London School of Economics and Political Science.


Papers
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Book
01 Nov 2007
TL;DR: In this article, the EU and the governance of European security are discussed, with a focus on the prevention of disorder along the periphery and the assurance of security in south eastern Europe.
Abstract: List of figures, tables and appendices Preface Acknowledgements List of abbreviations 1. Introduction: the EU and the governance of European security 2. Policies of prevention: pre-empting disorder along the periphery 3. Policies of assurance: peace-building in south eastern Europe 4. Policies of protection: meeting the challenge of internal security 5. Policies of compellance: projecting force into an uncertain world 6. Conclusion: securing Europe in the 21st century Bibliography Index -- .

113 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the twenty-year history of NATO's post-Cold War development, Operation Allied Force stands midway between the existential moment that was the collapse of the Soviet bloc and the current travails being experienced in Afghanistan.
Abstract: NATO has throughout its history been the subject of prognostications of crisis and dissolution. Indeed, the alliance has been written off so many times that crisis as normality has come to typify its development. In the twenty-year history of NATO's post-Cold War development, Operation Allied Force stands midway between the existential moment that was the collapse of the Soviet bloc and the current travails being experienced in Afghanistan. A comparison of NATO's experience in the Balkans and in the Afghan theatre suggests that the view of a NATO perched permanently at the edge of collapse is problematic and misleading. This is not to defend alliance actions as such but rather to suggest that the narrative of crisis and collapse makes for poor analysis and underestimates NATO's proclivity for adaptation and endurance.

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argues that it is possible for securitisation to occur in a ‘collective’ setting such as the EU and articulates a framework through which collective secur itisation can be understood – one that is then applied in a series of cases in the remainder of the Special Issue.
Abstract: The EU has long been recognised as a complex security actor with competences across a variety of security-relevant issues. These competences add up to a form of security governance, the pur...

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 2017
TL;DR: In this paper, a model of collective securitisation is presented and then applied empirically to the post-Cold War desecuritization of Russia and its subsequent resecuritisation following the annexation of Crimea.
Abstract: In securitisation theory (ST) little attention has been paid to how actors undertake securitisation collectively. The empirical focus of that theory has also, paradoxically, neglected the military-strategic sector and with it regional security organisations like NATO. Such an oversight is worth correcting for three reasons. First, NATO is constantly engaged in securitisation across a range of issues, a process that reflects an underappreciated recursive interaction between the Alliance and its member states. Second, the Ukraine crisis has resulted in Russia being explicitly identified as a source of threat and so has triggered a successful collective (re)securitisation by the Alliance. Third, a framework that demonstrates NATO’s standing as a securitising actor has potential relevance to other regional security organisations. This article discusses and amends ST in service of an approach that permits securitisation by actors other than the state, in this case NATO. A model of collective securitisation is presented and then applied empirically to the post-Cold War desecuritisation of Russia and its subsequent resecuritisation following the annexation of Crimea. The implications of resecuritisation for the emergence of a self-reinforcing security dilemma in NATO-Russia relations are also considered.

46 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Journal Article

1,684 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explained the EU political system and the decision-making procedures of the European Union, focusing on the role of the Single Market and the single market's role in the political system.
Abstract: Introduction: Explaining the EU Political System PART I: GOVERNMENT Executive Politics Legislative Politics Judicial Politics PART II: POLITICS Public Opinion Democracy, Parties and Elections Interest Representation PART III: POLICY-MAKING Regulation of the Single Market Expenditure Policies Economic and Monetary Union Citizen Freedom and Security Policies Foreign Policies Conclusions: Rethinking the European Union Appendix: Decision-making Procedures of the European Union Bibliography

1,282 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Ken Booth1

520 citations