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Javier L. Lara

Other affiliations: Cornell University
Bio: Javier L. Lara is an academic researcher from University of Cantabria. The author has contributed to research in topics: Breakwater & Breaking wave. The author has an hindex of 33, co-authored 114 publications receiving 4039 citations. Previous affiliations of Javier L. Lara include Cornell University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors introduce OpenFOAM® as a tool to consider for coastal engineering applications as it solves 3D domains and considers two-phase flow, and demonstrate that active wave absorption is found to enhance stability by decreasing the energy of the system and correcting the increasing water level on long simulations.

482 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the OpenFOAM® newly developed wave generation and active absorption boundary condition presented in the companion paper (Higuera et al., submitted for publication) is validated.

268 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide insight in the conditions under which ecosystems may be valuable for coastal protection, discuss which might be the most promising intertidal ecosystems for this task and identify knowledge gaps that currently hamper application and hence need attention from the scientific community.

256 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the contribution of seagrasses to coastal protection through a review of the most relevant existing knowledge and concluded that the optimal conditions for enhancing the protection supplied might be achieved in shallow waters and low wave energy environments, with high interaction surface, at the vertical and horizontal dimension, between water flow and seagrase.

244 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the results of a two-dimensional (2D) numerical modeling investigation of the functionality of rubble mound breakwaters with special attention focused on wave overtopping processes.

232 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
03 Jul 2015-Science
TL;DR: The physics, chemistry, and ecology of the oceans might be affected based on two CO2 emission trajectories: one business as usual and one with aggressive reductions, consistent with the Copenhagen Accord of keeping mean global temperature increase below 2°C in the 21st century.
Abstract: The ocean moderates anthropogenic climate change at the cost of profound alterations of its physics, chemistry, ecology, and services. Here, we evaluate and compare the risks of impacts on marine and coastal ecosystems—and the goods and services they provide—for growing cumulative carbon emissions under two contrasting emissions scenarios. The current emissions trajectory would rapidly and significantly alter many ecosystems and the associated services on which humans heavily depend. A reduced emissions scenario—consistent with the Copenhagen Accord’s goal of a global temperature increase of less than 2°C—is much more favorable to the ocean but still substantially alters important marine ecosystems and associated goods and services. The management options to address ocean impacts narrow as the ocean warms and acidifies. Consequently, any new climate regime that fails to minimize ocean impacts would be incomplete and inadequate.

1,053 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: The GMTED2010 layer extents (minimum and maximum latitude and longitude) are a result of the coordinate system inherited from the 1-arcsecond SRTM.
Abstract: For more information on the USGS—the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards, and the environment, visit http://www.usgs.gov or call 1–888–ASK–USGS. For an overview of USGS information products, including maps, imagery, and publications, Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Although this report is in the public domain, permission must be secured from the individual copyright owners to reproduce any copyrighted materials contained within this report. 10. Diagram showing the GMTED2010 layer extents (minimum and maximum latitude and longitude) are a result of the coordinate system inherited from the 1-arc-second SRTM

802 citations

01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: A 23-year database of calibrated and validated satellite altimeter measurements is used to investigate global changes in oceanic wind speed and wave height over this period and finds a general global trend of increasing values of windspeed and, to a lesser degree, wave height.
Abstract: Wind speeds over the world’s oceans have increased over the past two decades, as have wave heights. Studies of climate change typically consider measurements or predictions of temperature over extended periods of time. Climate, however, is much more than temperature. Over the oceans, changes in wind speed and the surface gravity waves generated by such winds play an important role. We used a 23-year database of calibrated and validated satellite altimeter measurements to investigate global changes in oceanic wind speed and wave height over this period. We find a general global trend of increasing values of wind speed and, to a lesser degree, wave height, over this period. The rate of increase is greater for extreme events as compared to the mean condition.

737 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, wave flume experiments show that marsh vegetation causes substantial wave dissipation and prevents erosion of the underlying surface, even during extreme storm surge conditions, and salt marshes protect coastlines against waves.
Abstract: Salt marshes protect coastlines against waves. Wave flume experiments show that marsh vegetation causes substantial wave dissipation and prevents erosion of the underlying surface, even during extreme storm surge conditions.

623 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors introduce OpenFOAM® as a tool to consider for coastal engineering applications as it solves 3D domains and considers two-phase flow, and demonstrate that active wave absorption is found to enhance stability by decreasing the energy of the system and correcting the increasing water level on long simulations.

482 citations