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Jay S. Wunder

Bio: Jay S. Wunder is an academic researcher from University of Toronto. The author has contributed to research in topics: Soft tissue sarcoma & Sarcoma. The author has an hindex of 69, co-authored 311 publications receiving 16916 citations. Previous affiliations of Jay S. Wunder include University Health Network & Princess Margaret Cancer Centre.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Overall survival was slightly better in patients who had preoperative radiotherapy than in those who had postoperative treatment, and the size and anatomical site of the tumour was also significant risk factors in multivariate analysis.

1,277 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clinical samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction is devised, which was found to be effective in most solid tumors and leukemias tested.
Abstract: The resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in vitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refractory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. We have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clinical samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. We have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and greater than 300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were most common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy.

713 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Kevin B. Jacobs1, Kevin B. Jacobs2, Meredith Yeager2, Meredith Yeager1  +205 moreInstitutions (52)
TL;DR: In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls from 13 genome-wide association studies, this paper observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones in DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples.
Abstract: In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls from 13 genome-wide association studies, we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones in DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. We observed mosaic abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of >2 Mb in size in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%), with abnormal cell proportions of between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, frequency increased with age, from 0.23% under 50 years to 1.91% between 75 and 79 years (P = 4.8 × 10(-8)). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals; odds ratio (OR) = 1.25; P = 0.016), with stronger association with cases who had DNA collected before diagnosis or treatment (OR = 1.45; P = 0.0005). Detectable mosaicism was also more common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least 1 year before diagnosis with leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR = 35.4; P = 3.8 × 10(-11)). These findings underscore the time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and potentially other late-onset diseases.

496 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: EWS-FLI1 fusion type appears to be prognostically relevant in ES, independent of tumor site, stage, and size.
Abstract: PURPOSEMore than 90% of Ewing's sarcomas (ES) contain a fusion of the EWS and FLI1 genes, due to the t(11;22)(q24;q12) translocation. At the molecular level, the EWS-FLI1 rearrangements show great diversity. Specifically, many different combinations of exons from EWS and FLI1 encode in-frame fusion transcripts and result in differences in the length and composition of the chimeric protein, which functions as an oncogenic aberrant transcription factor. In the most common fusion type (type 1), EWS exon 7 is linked in frame with exon 6 of FLI1. As the fundamental pathogenetic lesion in ES, the molecular heterogeneity of these fusion transcripts may have functional and clinical significance.PATIENTS AND METHODSWe performed a clinical and pathologic analysis of 112 patients with ES in which EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts were identified by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Adequate treatment and follow-up data were available in 99 patients treated with curative intent. Median follow-up in ...

475 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 2001-Methods
TL;DR: The 2-Delta Delta C(T) method as mentioned in this paper was proposed to analyze the relative changes in gene expression from real-time quantitative PCR experiments, and it has been shown to be useful in the analysis of realtime, quantitative PCR data.

139,407 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
06 Jun 2013-Cell
TL;DR: Nine tentative hallmarks that represent common denominators of aging in different organisms are enumerated, with special emphasis on mammalian aging, to identify pharmaceutical targets to improve human health during aging, with minimal side effects.

9,980 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The ability to predict and circumvent drug resistance is likely to improve chemotherapy, and it has become apparent that resistance exists against every effective drug, even the authors' newest agents.
Abstract: Chemotherapeutics are the most effective treatment for metastatic tumours. However, the ability of cancer cells to become simultaneously resistant to different drugs--a trait known as multidrug resistance--remains a significant impediment to successful chemotherapy. Three decades of multidrug-resistance research have identified a myriad of ways in which cancer cells can elude chemotherapy, and it has become apparent that resistance exists against every effective drug, even our newest agents. Therefore, the ability to predict and circumvent drug resistance is likely to improve chemotherapy.

5,105 citations

01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: This list includes tumours of undefined neoplastic nature, which are of uncertain differentiation Bone Tumours, Ewing sarcoma/Primitive neuroedtodermal tumour, Myogenic, lipogenic, neural and epithelial tumours, and others.

4,185 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This Perspective has organized known cancer-associated metabolic changes into six hallmarks: deregulated uptake of glucose and amino acids, use of opportunistic modes of nutrient acquisition, useof glycolysis/TCA cycle intermediates for biosynthesis and NADPH production, increased demand for nitrogen, alterations in metabolite-driven gene regulation, and metabolic interactions with the microenvironment.

3,565 citations