scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Jay VerLinden

Bio: Jay VerLinden is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Critical thinking. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 65 citations.

Papers
More filters

Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors summarizes the available empirical evidence on the impact of instruction on the development and enhancement of critical thinking skills and dispositions and student achievement and concludes that the opportunity for dialogue, the exposure of students to authentic or situated problems and examples, and mentoring had positive effects on CT skills.
Abstract: Critical thinking (CT) is purposeful, self-regulatory judgment that results in interpretation, analysis, evaluation, and inference, as well as explanations of the considerations on which that judgment is based. This article summarizes the available empirical evidence on the impact of instruction on the development and enhancement of critical thinking skills and dispositions and student achievement. The review includes 341 effects sizes drawn from quasi- or true-experimental studies that used standardized measures of CT as outcome variables. The weighted random effects mean effect size (g+) was 0.30 (p < .001). The collection was heterogeneous (p < .001). Results demonstrate that there are effective strategies for teaching CT skills, both generic and content specific, and CT dispositions, at all educational levels and across all disciplinary areas. Notably, the opportunity for dialogue, the exposure of students to authentic or situated problems and examples, and mentoring had positive effects on CT skills.

469 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: It is argued that critical thinking acts as another cognitive strategy of self-regulation that learners use in their learning, and critical thinking may be a product of various antecedents such as different self-regulatory strategies.
Abstract: This article presents a theoretically grounded model of critical thinking and self-regulation in the context of teaching and learning. Critical thinking, deriving from an educational psychology perspective is a complex process of reflection that helps individuals become more analytical in their thinking and professional development. My conceptualisation in this discussion paper argues that both theoretical orientations (critical thinking and self-regulation) operate in a dynamic interactive system of teaching and learning. My argument, based on existing research evidence, suggests two important points: (i) critical thinking acts as another cognitive strategy of self-regulation that learners use in their learning, and (ii) critical thinking may be a product of various antecedents such as different selfregulatory strategies.

100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore how far it can be established from the published research literature whether the key factor affecting Chinese university students' critical thinking with respect to academic study in English is cultural background or previous training.
Abstract: Despite extensive discussion on critical thinking (CT) by Chinese students, there are still debates over the question of why Chinese higher education students, when studying abroad, lack (or rather do not demonstrate) CT skills. The main objective of this paper is to explore how far it can be established from the published research literature whether the key factor affecting Chinese university students' CT with respect to academic study in English is cultural background or previous training. The conclusion is that culture cannot be the sole explanation for Chinese students' CT performance at universities abroad. The evidence strongly suggests that, while CT elements can indeed be found in ancient Chinese culture, many other factors, especially students' previous learning experiences, are of more immediate relevance and likely to affect performance. As a result, a holistic approach is suggested. The review also suggests that there is at times a lack of clear definitions and/or explanations of the scope of ...

95 citations

Dissertation
23 Feb 2017
TL;DR: This article investigated the use of a conversational agent (Botocrates) for supporting critical thinking and academic argumentation skills in higher education, and identified two main tasks of Botocrates: providing answers to students' enquiries and engaging students in the argumentation process.
Abstract: Students in higher education institutions are often advised to think critically, yet without being guided to do so. The study investigated the use of a conversational agent (Botocrates) for supporting critical thinking and academic argumentation skills. The overarching research questions were: can a conversational agent support critical thinking and academic argumentation skills? If so, how? The study was carried out in two stages: modelling and evaluating Botocrates' prototype. The prototype was a Wizard-of-Oz system where a human plays Botocrates' role by following a set of instructions and knowledge-base to guide generation of responses. Both stages were conducted at the School of Education at the University of Leeds. In the first stage, the study analysed 13 logs of online seminars in order to define the tasks and dialogue strategies needed to be performed by Botocrates. The study identified two main tasks of Botocrates: providing answers to students' enquiries and engaging students in the argumentation process. Botocrates’ dialogue strategies and contents were built to achieve these two tasks. The novel theoretical framework of the ‘challenge to explain’ process and the notion of the ‘constructive expansion of exchange structure’ were produced during this stage and incorporated into Botocrates’ prototype. The aim of the ‘challenge to explain’ process is to engage users in repeated and constant cycles of reflective thinking processes. The ‘constructive expansion of exchange structure’ is the practical application of the ‘challenge to explain’ process. In the second stage, the study used the Wizard-of-Oz (WOZ) experiments and interviews to evaluate Botocrates’ prototype. 7 students participated in the evaluation stage and each participant was immediately interviewed after chatting with Botocrates. The analysis of the data gathered from the WOZ and interviews showed encouraging results in terms of students’ engagement in the process of argumentation. As a result of the role of ‘critic’ played by Botocrates during the interactions, users actively and positively adopted the roles of explainer, clarifier, and evaluator. However, the results also showed negative experiences that occurred to users during the interaction. Improving Botocrates’ performance and training users could decrease users’ unsuccessful and negative experiences. The study identified the critical success and failure factors related to achieving the tasks of Botocrates.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The proposed framework and the strategies for dynamic discussion provide an online learning environment in which students learn beyond the goal of the course and build on the adoptive learning taking place through assignments designed to promote adaptive learning and challenge their cognitive abilities.
Abstract: A framework for deep learning for dynamic online discussion in distance education is illustrated in this paper. The foundation of the framework is based on three general processes: information, methods and cognition. A structure for dynamic discussions within the framework provides three types of online discussion; flexible peer, structured topic and collaborative task discussion. The framework was applied during two semesters of an online multimedia design for instruction in a graduate level course. The strategies for creating dynamic discussion serve to facilitate online interactions among diverse learners and assist in the design of assignments for effective interactions. Students build on the adoptive learning taking place through assignments designed to promote adaptive learning and challenge their cognitive abilities, resulting in deep learning. The proposed framework and the strategies for dynamic discussion provide an online learning environment in which students learn beyond the goal of the cours...

53 citations