scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Jean-Luc Nancy

Other affiliations: European Graduate School
Bio: Jean-Luc Nancy is an academic researcher from University of Strasbourg. The author has contributed to research in topics: Democracy & Politics. The author has an hindex of 34, co-authored 222 publications receiving 6419 citations. Previous affiliations of Jean-Luc Nancy include European Graduate School.


Papers
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: The inoperative community Myth interrupted "Literary communism" Shattered love Of divine places as discussed by the authors, which is the basis for our own "Shattered love of divine places" [2].
Abstract: The inoperative community Myth interrupted "Literary communism" Shattered love Of divine places

1,130 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: In this paper, the singular plural of being singular plural has been used to describe war, right, sovereignty - Techne 3. Eulogy for the Mele e 4. The surprice of the event 5. Human excess 6.
Abstract: Preface 1. Of being singular plural 2. War, right, sovereignty - Techne 3. Eulogy for the Mele e 4. The surprice of the event 5. Human excess 6. Cosmos Baselius Notes.

886 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1989-Mln
TL;DR: Lacoue-Labarthe as discussed by the authors presents a theory of literature in German Romanticism at the intersection of the 19th and the 18th centuries, which he calls The Literary Absolute.
Abstract: title : The Literary Absolute : The Theory of Literature in German Romanticism Intersections (Albany, N.Y.) author : Lacoue-Labarthe, Philippe.; Nancy, Jean-Luc. publisher : State University of New York Press isbn10 | asin : 0887066615 print isbn13 : 9780887066610 ebook isbn13 : 9780585091761 language : English subject Romanticism--Germany, German literature--18th century-History and criticism, German literature--19th century--History and criticism, German literature--History and criticism-Theory, etc, Criticism--Germany--History, Philosophy, German--18th century, Phi publication date : 1988 lcc : PT363.P6L3 1988eb ddc : 830/.9/145 subject : Romanticism--Germany, German literature--18th century-History and criticism, German literature--19th century--History and criticism, German literature--History and criticism-Theory, etc, Criticism--Germany--History, Philosophy, German--18th century, Phi

327 citations

Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: The authors presents an overview of contemporary French thought on the question of the subject, as it is viewed in philosophy, politics, history and psychoanalysis, including the most recent research from a host of the foremost contemporary French figures in philosophy and theory, including Deleuze, Derrida, Lyotard, Lacoue-Labarthe, Nancy, Descombes, Kofman, Irigaray, and Balibar.
Abstract: "Who Comes After the Subject?" offers an overview of contemporary French thought on the question of the "subject", as it is viewed in philosophy, politics, history and psychoanalysis. It represents the most recent research from a host of the foremost contemporary French figures in philosophy and theory, including Deleuze, Derrida, Lyotard, Lacoue-Labarthe, Nancy, Descombes, Kofman, Irigaray, and Balibar.

268 citations

Book
01 Sep 1933
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that the coming of a human being is not the constitution of an identity, but the endless departure of a identity from, and from within, its other, or others, but rather the joy of averring oneself to be continually in the state of being born.
Abstract: The epoch of representation is as old as the West Indeed, representation is the West, understood as what at once designates and expands its own limits But what comes after the West? What comes after representation's disclosure of its own limit? The central problem posed in these essays, collected from over a decade of work, is how in the wake of Western ontologies to conceive the coming, the birth that characterizes being We are now at the limit of representation, where objects as we experience them have been show to be merely objects of representation-or rather, of presentation, since there is nothing to (re)present The first part of this book, "Existence," asks how, today, one can give sense of meaning to existence as such, arguing that existence itself, as it comes nude into the world, must now be our "sense" In examining what this birth to presence might be, we should not ask what presence "is"; rather we should conceive presence as presence to someone, including to presence itself This birth is not the constitution of an identity, but the endless departure of an identity from, and from within, its other, or others Its coming is not desire but jouissance, the joy of averring oneself to be continually in the state of being born-a rejoicing of birth, a birth of rejoicing The second section, "Poetry," asks: What art exposes this? In writing, in the voice, in painting? And what if art is exposed to it? How does it inscribe (or rather, "exscribe," in a term the book develops) the coming existence as such? The author's trajectory in this book crosses those of Hegel, Schlegel, Baudelaire, Nietzsche, Freud, and Heidegger, in their comments on art and politics, existence and corporeality, everyday life and its modes of existence and ecstasy An analysis that dares this crossing involves all the varied accounts of existence, political as well as philosophical, and all the realms of poverty

245 citations


Cited by
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present the logic of sovereignty and the paradox of sovereignty in the form of the human sacer and the notion of potentiality and potentiality-and-law.
Abstract: Introduction Part I. The Logic of Sovereignty: 1. The paradox of sovereignty 2. 'Nomos Basileus' 3. Potentiality and law 4. Form of law Threshold Part II. Homo Sacer: 1. Homo sacer 2. The ambivalence of the sacred 3. Sacred life 4. 'Vitae Necisque Potestas' 5. Sovereign body and sacred body 6. The ban and the wolf Threshold Part III. The Camp as Biopolitical Paradigm of the Modern: 1. The politicization of life 2. Biopolitics and the rights of man 3. Life that does not deserve to live 4. 'Politics, or giving form to the life of a people' 5. VP 6. Politicizing death 7. The camp as the 'Nomos' of the modern Threshold Bibliography Index of names.

7,589 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The Precarious Life: The Power of Mourning and Violence and Undoing Gender by Judith Butler as mentioned in this paper is an extended study of moral philosophy that is grounded in a new sense of the human subject.
Abstract: What does it mean to lead a moral life?In her first extended study of moral philosophy, Judith Butler offers a provocative outline for a new ethical practice-one responsive to the need for critical autonomy and grounded in a new sense of the human subject.Butler takes as her starting point one's ability to answer the questions What have I done?and What ought I to do?She shows that these question can be answered only by asking a prior question, Who is this 'I' who is under an obligation to give an account of itself and to act in certain ways?Because I find that I cannot give an account of myself without accounting for the social conditions under which I emerge, ethical reflection requires a turn to social theory.In three powerfully crafted and lucidly written chapters, Butler demonstrates how difficult it is to give an account of oneself, and how this lack of self-transparency and narratibility is crucial to an ethical understanding of the human. In brilliant dialogue with Adorno, Levinas, Foucault, and other thinkers, she eloquently argues the limits, possibilities, and dangers of contemporary ethical thought.Butler offers a critique of the moral self, arguing that the transparent, rational, and continuous ethical subject is an impossible construct that seeks to deny the specificity of what it is to be human. We can know ourselves only incompletely, and only in relation to a broader social world that has always preceded us and already shaped us in ways we cannot grasp. If inevitably we are partially opaque to ourselves, how can giving an account of ourselves define the ethical act? And doesn't an ethical system that holds us impossibly accountable for full self-knowledge and self-consistency inflict a kind of psychic violence, leading to a culture of self-beratement and cruelty? How does the turn to social theory offer us a chance to understand the specifically social character of our own unknowingness about ourselves?In this invaluable book, by recasting ethics as a project in which being ethical means becoming critical of norms under which we are asked to act, but which we can never fully choose, Butler illuminates what it means for us as fallible creaturesto create and share an ethics of vulnerability, humility, and ethical responsiveness. Judtith Butler is the Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. The most recent of her books are Precarious Life: The Power of Mourning and Violence and Undoing Gender.

2,547 citations

Book
04 Apr 1996
TL;DR: Hall and Donald as discussed by the authors discuss the history of identity in a short history from Pilgrim to tourist, from Tourist to Tourist, and the role of identity as a marker of identity.
Abstract: Introduction - Stuart Hall Who Needs 'Identity'? From Pilgrim to Tourist - or a Short History of Identity - Zygmunt Bauman Enabling Identity? - Marilyn Strathern Biology, Choice and the New Reproductive Technologies Culture's In-Between - Homi K Bhabha Interrupting Identities - Kevin Robins Turkey/Europe Identity and Cultural Studies - Is That All There Is? - Lawrence Grossberg Music and Identity - Simon Frith Identity, Genealogy, History - Nikolas Rose Organizing Identity - Paul du Gay Entrepreneurial Governance and Public Management The Citizen and the Man about Town - James Donald

2,090 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: Gibson and Graham as discussed by the authors describe a politics of possibility that can build different economies in place and over space, and argue that post-capitalist subjects, economies, and communities can be fostered.
Abstract: Is there life after capitalism? In this creatively argued follow-up to their book The End of Capitalism (As We Knew It), J. K. Gibson-Graham offer already existing alternatives to a global capitalist order and outline strategies for building alternative economies. A Postcapitalist Politics reveals a prolific landscape of economic diversity-one that is not exclusively or predominantly capitalist-and examines the challenges and successes of alternative economic interventions. Gibson-Graham bring together political economy, feminist poststructuralism, and economic activism to foreground the ethical decisions, as opposed to structural imperatives, that construct economic "development" pathways. Marshalling empirical evidence from local economic projects and action research in the United States, Australia, and Asia, they produce a distinctive political imaginary with three intersecting moments: a politics of language, of the subject, and of collective action. In the face of an almost universal sense of surrender to capitalist globalization, this book demonstrates that postcapitalist subjects, economies, and communities can be fostered. The authors describe a politics of possibility that can build different economies in place and over space. They urge us to confront the forces that stand in the way of economic experimentation and to explore different ways of moving from theory to action. J. K. Gibson-Graham is the pen name of Katherine Gibson and Julie Graham, feminist economic geographers who work, respectively, at the Australian National University in Canberra and the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

1,561 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, Cardozo et al. proposed a model for conflict resolution in the context of bankruptcy resolution, which is based on the work of the Cardozo Institute of Conflict Resolution.
Abstract: American Bankruptcy Institute Law Review 17 Am. Bankr. Inst. L. Rev., No. 1, Spring, 2009. Boston College Law Review 50 B.C. L. Rev., No. 3, May, 2009. Boston University Public Interest Law Journal 18 B.U. Pub. Int. L.J., No. 2, Spring, 2009. Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution 10 Cardozo J. Conflict Resol., No. 2, Spring, 2009. Cardozo Public Law, Policy, & Ethics Journal 7 Cardozo Pub. L. Pol’y & Ethics J., No. 3, Summer, 2009. Chicago Journal of International Law 10 Chi. J. Int’l L., No. 1, Summer, 2009. Colorado Journal of International Environmental Law and Policy 20 Colo. J. Int’l Envtl. L. & Pol’y, No. 2, Winter, 2009. Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts 32 Colum. J.L. & Arts, No. 3, Spring, 2009. Connecticut Public Interest Law Journal 8 Conn. Pub. Int. L.J., No. 2, Spring-Summer, 2009. Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy 18 Cornell J.L. & Pub. Pol’y, No. 1, Fall, 2008. Cornell Law Review 94 Cornell L. Rev., No. 5, July, 2009. Creighton Law Review 42 Creighton L. Rev., No. 3, April, 2009. Criminal Law Forum 20 Crim. L. Forum, Nos. 2-3, Pp. 173-394, 2009. Delaware Journal of Corporate Law 34 Del. J. Corp. L., No. 2, Pp. 433-754, 2009. Environmental Law Reporter News & Analysis 39 Envtl. L. Rep. News & Analysis, No. 7, July, 2009. European Journal of International Law 20 Eur. J. Int’l L., No. 2, April, 2009. Family Law Quarterly 43 Fam. L.Q., No. 1, Spring, 2009. Georgetown Journal of International Law 40 Geo. J. Int’l L., No. 3, Spring, 2009. Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics 22 Geo. J. Legal Ethics, No. 2, Spring, 2009. Golden Gate University Law Review 39 Golden Gate U. L. Rev., No. 2, Winter, 2009. Harvard Environmental Law Review 33 Harv. Envtl. L. Rev., No. 2, Pp. 297-608, 2009. International Review of Law and Economics 29 Int’l Rev. L. & Econ., No. 1, March, 2009. Journal of Environmental Law and Litigation 24 J. Envtl. L. & Litig., No. 1, Pp. 1-201, 2009. Journal of Legislation 34 J. Legis., No. 1, Pp. 1-98, 2008. Journal of Technology Law & Policy 14 J. Tech. L. & Pol’y, No. 1, June, 2009. Labor Lawyer 24 Lab. Law., No. 3, Winter/Spring, 2009. Michigan Journal of International Law 30 Mich. J. Int’l L., No. 3, Spring, 2009. New Criminal Law Review 12 New Crim. L. Rev., No. 2, Spring, 2009. Northern Kentucky Law Review 36 N. Ky. L. Rev., No. 4, Pp. 445-654, 2009. Ohio Northern University Law Review 35 Ohio N.U. L. Rev., No. 2, Pp. 445-886, 2009. Pace Law Review 29 Pace L. Rev., No. 3, Spring, 2009. Quinnipiac Health Law Journal 12 Quinnipiac Health L.J., No. 2, Pp. 209-332, 2008-2009. Real Property, Trust and Estate Law Journal 44 Real Prop. Tr. & Est. L.J., No. 1, Spring, 2009. Rutgers Race and the Law Review 10 Rutgers Race & L. Rev., No. 2, Pp. 441-629, 2009. San Diego Law Review 46 San Diego L. Rev., No. 2, Spring, 2009. Seton Hall Law Review 39 Seton Hall L. Rev., No. 3, Pp. 725-1102, 2009. Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal 18 S. Cal. Interdisc. L.J., No. 3, Spring, 2009. Stanford Environmental Law Journal 28 Stan. Envtl. L.J., No. 3, July, 2009. Tulsa Law Review 44 Tulsa L. Rev., No. 2, Winter, 2008. UMKC Law Review 77 UMKC L. Rev., No. 4, Summer, 2009. Washburn Law Journal 48 Washburn L.J., No. 3, Spring, 2009. Washington University Global Studies Law Review 8 Wash. U. Global Stud. L. Rev., No. 3, Pp.451-617, 2009. Washington University Journal of Law & Policy 29 Wash. U. J.L. & Pol’y, Pp. 1-401, 2009. Washington University Law Review 86 Wash. U. L. Rev., No. 6, Pp. 1273-1521, 2009. William Mitchell Law Review 35 Wm. Mitchell L. Rev., No. 4, Pp. 1235-1609, 2009. Yale Journal of International Law 34 Yale J. Int’l L., No. 2, Summer, 2009. Yale Journal on Regulation 26 Yale J. on Reg., No. 2, Summer, 2009.

1,336 citations