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Author

Jean-Pierre Jessel

Other affiliations: Paul Sabatier University
Bio: Jean-Pierre Jessel is an academic researcher from University of Toulouse. The author has contributed to research in topics: Augmented reality & Virtual reality. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 104 publications receiving 1353 citations. Previous affiliations of Jean-Pierre Jessel include Paul Sabatier University.


Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: The purpose of this chapter is to introduce an overall classification system for Serious Games that addresses a number of these limitations: the G/P/S model, which classifies games according to both their “serious-related” and game-related characteristics, and combines the strengths of several previous classification systems.
Abstract: The purpose of this chapter is to introduce an overall classification system for Serious Games. The intention of this classification is to guide people through the vast field of Serious Games by providing them with a general overview. For example, it may appeal to teachers who wish to find games with strong educational potential though they may be outside the “edugames” field. We will start by discussing the definition of Serious Games, and define them as having a combination of “serious” and “game” aspects. This theoretical framework will be used to review previous classification systems and discuss their limitations. We will then introduce a new classification that addresses a number of these limitations: the G/P/S model. This classifies games according to both their “serious-related” and “game-related” characteristics, and combines the strengths of several previous classification systems.

341 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the historical origins of Serious Games to try to understand where the current wave of “Serious Games” comes from and to highlight the differences between “serious games” and their ancestors.
Abstract: The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the historical origins of Serious Games to try to understand where the current wave of “Serious Games” comes from. We first review the origins of the “Serious Games” oxymoron. We will then analyse digital games designed for serious purposes before the 2000s. Such games can be traced back to the beginning of the history of video games. We will use all these elements to discuss how the current wave of “Serious Games” began; and to highlight the differences between “Serious Games” and their ancestors.

316 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: From programming teaching features to video game characteristics, this paper defines a teaching organisation to experiment if a serious game can be adapted to learn programming and Real-Time Strategy seems to be the most suitable kind of game.
Abstract: Video games are part of our culture like TV, movies, and books. We believe that this kind of software can be used to increase students' interest in computer science. Video games with other goals than entertainment, serious games, are present, today, in several fields such as education, government, health, defence, industry, civil security, and science. This paper presents a study around a serious game dedicated to strengthening programming skills. Real-Time Strategy, which is a popular game genre, seems to be the most suitable kind of game to support such a serious game. From programming teaching features to video game characteristics, we define a teaching organisation to experiment if a serious game can be adapted to learn programming.

118 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
10 Jan 2008
TL;DR: This article will study the nature of recurrent diagrams within rules of videogames, especially the link they seem to have with two types of game rules: the rules that allow the player to "manipulate" the elements of the game, and the rules defining the "goal" of thegame.
Abstract: This paper is part of an experimental approach aimed to raise a videogames classification Being inspired by the methodology that Propp used for the classification of Russian fairy tales, we have identified recurrent diagrams within rules of videogames, that we called "Gameplay Bricks" The combinations of these different bricks should allow us to represent a classification of all videogames in accordance with their rules In this article, we will study the nature of these bricks, especially the link they seem to have with two types of game rules: the rules that allow the player to "manipulate" the elements of the game, and the rules defining the "goal" of the game This study will lead to an hypothesis about the nature of gameplay

101 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2011
TL;DR: An experimental feedback on a serious game dedicated to strengthening programming skills, built on an open source real‐time strategy game, based on an iterative process that allows to implement the game and carry out experimentations in several contexts is presented.
Abstract: This paper presents an experimental feedback on a serious game dedicated to strengthening programming skills. This serious game called Prog&Play is built on an open source realtime strategy game. Its goal is to be compatible with different students, teachers and institutions. We propose an iterative evaluation in order to improve it while experiments are running. Through this evaluation, we define a framework that will be tested by third parties in different contexts and we analyse negative points and mistakes in order to improve the project. In every instance, evaluation is beneficial and allows establishing a communication about the implemented practices.

76 citations


Cited by
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01 Nov 2008

2,686 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: VR seems to be a promising sphere as this study identifies 18 application domains, indicating a better reception of this technology in many disciplines, and several gaps point toward unexplored regions of VR design for education, which could motivate future work in the field.
Abstract: Researchers have explored the benefits and applications of virtual reality (VR) in different scenarios. VR possesses much potential and its application in education has seen much research interest lately. However, little systematic work currently exists on how researchers have applied immersive VR for higher education purposes that considers the usage of both high-end and budget head-mounted displays (HMDs). Hence, we propose using systematic mapping to identify design elements of existing research dedicated to the application of VR in higher education. The reviewed articles were acquired by extracting key information from documents indexed in four scientific digital libraries, which were filtered systematically using exclusion, inclusion, semi-automatic, and manual methods. Our review emphasizes three key points: the current domain structure in terms of the learning contents, the VR design elements, and the learning theories, as a foundation for successful VR-based learning. The mapping was conducted between application domains and learning contents and between design elements and learning contents. Our analysis has uncovered several gaps in the application of VR in the higher education sphere—for instance, learning theories were not often considered in VR application development to assist and guide toward learning outcomes. Furthermore, the evaluation of educational VR applications has primarily focused on usability of the VR apps instead of learning outcomes and immersive VR has mostly been a part of experimental and development work rather than being applied regularly in actual teaching. Nevertheless, VR seems to be a promising sphere as this study identifies 18 application domains, indicating a better reception of this technology in many disciplines. The identified gaps point toward unexplored regions of VR design for education, which could motivate future work in the field.

914 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The objective was to review the results of experimental studies designed to examine the effectiveness of VGs and SGs on players' learning and engagement and stress the limitations of the existing literature and make a number of suggestions for future studies.
Abstract: Computer-assisted learning is known to be an effective tool for improving learning in both adults and children. Recent years have seen the emergence of the so-called ‘serious games (SGs)’ that are flooding the educational games market. In this paper, the term ‘serious games’ is used to refer to video games (VGs) intended to serve a useful purpose. The objective was to review the results of experimental studies designed to examine the effectiveness of VGs and SGs on players' learning and engagement. After pointing out the varied nature of the obtained results and the impossibility of reaching any reliable conclusion concerning the effectiveness of VGs and SGs in learning, we stress the limitations of the existing literature and make a number of suggestions for future studies.

598 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Learning Mechanics–Game Mechanics (LM-GM) model is proposed, which supports SG analysis and design by allowing reflection on the various pedagogical and game elements in an SG.
Abstract: Although there is a consensus on the instructional potential of Serious Games (SGs), there is still a lack of methodologies and tools not only for design but also to support analysis and assessment. Filling this gap is one of the main aims of the Games and Learning Alliance (http://www.galanoe.eu) European Network of Excellence on Serious Games, which has a focus upon pedagogy-driven SGs. This paper relies on the assumption that the fundamental aspect of SG design consists in the translation of learning goals/practices into mechanical element of gameplay, serving to an instructional purpose beside that of play and fun. This paper proposes the Learning Mechanics–Game Mechanics (LM-GM) model, which supports SG analysis and design by allowing reflection on the various pedagogical and game elements in an SG. The LM-GM model includes a set of pre-defined game mechanics and pedagogical elements that we have abstracted from literature on game studies and learning theories. Designers and analysts can exploit these mechanics to draw the LM-GM map for a game, so as to identify and highlight its main pedagogical and entertainment features, and their interrelations. The tool may also be useful for teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of a given game and better understand how to implement it in educational settings. A case study is reported to illustrate the framework's support in determining how gameplay and pedagogy intertwine in an SG. Finally, the paper presents the results of two comparative user tests demonstrating the advantages of the proposed model with respect to a similar state-of-the-art framework.

562 citations