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Author

Jeffrey D. Kahn

Other affiliations: University of Oslo
Bio: Jeffrey D. Kahn is an academic researcher from Southern Methodist University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Human rights & Constitution. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 34 publications receiving 380 citations. Previous affiliations of Jeffrey D. Kahn include University of Oslo.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: The Federal Reforms of Vladimir Putin this paper, the first step in the process of Russian federalism, are described in detail in Section 5.1.1].2.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. Federal Theory 3. Soviet 'Federalism' 4. Gorbachev's Federalism Problem 5. The Process of Federal Transition 6. Inter-Governmental Relations Under Yeltsin's New Federalism 7. Federal Effects on Transitions in Russia's Republics 8. The Federal Reforms of Vladimir Putin 9. Conclusion

97 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors interpret the dynamics of the collapse of the Soviet Union by analyzing the cascade of sovereignty declarations issued by republics of the USSR as well as by autonomous republics and other subunits of the Russian republic, in 1990-1991.
Abstract: On the basis of extensive on-site interviews and documentary sources, the author interprets the dynamics of the collapse of the Soviet Union by analyzing the cascade of sovereignty declarations issued by republics of the USSR as well as by autonomous republics and other subunits of the Russian republic, in 1990-1991. Interrelationships among the declarations, and other putative causes of their content and timing, are explored. A case study of Tatarstan is provided. The study also analyzes the impact of the process on subsequent Russian approaches to federalism.

41 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors interpret the dynamics of the collapse of the Soviet Union by analyzing the cascade of sovereignty declarations issued by republics of the USSR as well as by autonomous republics and other subunits of the Russian republic, in 1990-1991.
Abstract: On the basis of extensive on-site interviews and documentary sources, the author interprets the dynamics of the collapse of the Soviet Union by analyzing the cascade of sovereignty declarations issued by republics of the USSR as well as by autonomous republics and other subunits of the Russian republic, in 1990-1991. Interrelationships among the declarations, and other putative causes of their content and timing, are explored. A case study of Tatarstan is provided. The study also analyzes the impact of the process on subsequent Russian approaches to federalism.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the core legal subjects, processes, and institutions composing the Russian legal system are examined and the source of legal changes, as Russian federalism has shifted from decentralized beginnings under Yel'tsin to the current centralized system under Medvedev and Putin, is evaluated.
Abstract: How have fluctuating approaches to federalism in post-Soviet Russia affected its legal system? This article examines the core legal subjects, processes, and institutions composing the Russian legal system. The source of legal changes, as Russian federalism has shifted from decentralized beginnings under Yel'tsin to the current centralized system under Medvedev and Putin, is evaluated. Seeds for centralization in the original 1993 Constitution and the roles of "top down," "bottom up," and "outside in" pressures to centralize the federal system are examined. The degree of unification and centralization of Russian law and the de facto nature of the legal system are analyzed.

27 citations

Posted Content
Abstract: There exists broad consensus in political science that the rule of law is as essential to a consolidated modern democracy as electoral politics or a robust civil society. Paradoxically, however, the rule of law as an institution has not been subjected to nearly the same rigorous study as those other popular variables. Although frequently used, the term is rarely defined. Political scientists declare the general importance of the rule of law, but reduce their focus to the "rules of the game" for political elites and the adoption of select laws and judicial institutions. Frequently, an instrumentalist metaphor is deployed: the law is a sword, or shield, or tool to advance democratic ends, by which the law's utility can be measured.This Article presents two related arguments against such approaches to the study of the rule of law in Russia. First, predictions about Russian democracy will be more prone to error if specialists on Russia urge the development of the rule of law but limit themselves to cramped understandings of the full parameters of this institution. Second, instrumentalist metaphors of the rule of law hinder our understanding of the importance of the rule of law for a would-be democracy like Russia. The rule of law is better understood there not as an instrument wielded by or against the state, but as a causeway. The primary value of this causeway stems from the security its existence provides citizens to move freely among state and non-state institutions in daily life, commerce, and politics.Exactly what sort of an institution is the rule of law? What is the extent of its value in a teetering electoral democracy like Russia? How can its existence - let alone its efficacy - be measured in such a state? These are the questions addressed in this Article from theoretical, historical, and contemporary political perspectives.

21 citations


Cited by
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Book
30 Jun 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a collection of books that bring together the best of this intellectual diversity into one collection, focusing on nationalism in political, social and cultural theory.
Abstract: Nationalism has long excited debate in political, social and cultural theory and remains a key field of enquiry among historians, anthropologists, sociologists as well as political scientists. It is also one of the critical media issues of our time. There are, however, surprisingly few volumes that bring together the best of this intellectual diversity into one collection.

323 citations

Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors define the fundamental problem of federal stability as "the long search for stability" and propose three levels of institutional design: 1.1 Alliances versus federations 2.3 Equilibrium selection and redistribution 2.4 Secession: the special road to renegotiation 4.5 Other parameters of design 4.6 Bilateral decision-making and the case of Russia 5.3 The feasibility of success in initial bargaining 3.4 Voters versus elites 5.6 India Leadership incentives Rank and file incentives 6.3 Level 3 institutions 7.4 Conclusion.
Abstract: 1. Federations and the theoretical problem: 1.1 Why Federalism 1.2 Definitions 1.3 The long search for stability Federalism as nuisance Federalism as engine of prosperity Riker as intermediary 1.4 The fundamental problem of stability 1.5 Basic premises and conclusions 2. Federal bargaining: 2.1 Alliances versus federations 2.2 The private character of public goods 2.3 Equilibrium selection and redistribution 2.4 The 'federal problem' 2.5 Bargaining for control of the center 2.6 Allocating jurisdictions 2.7 Three levels of institutional design 3. Two cases of uninstitutionalized bargaining: 3.1 The Czechoslovak dissolution 3.2 The Soviet dissolution 3.3 The feasibility of success in initial bargaining 3.4 Secession: the special road to renegotiation 4. Representation: 4.1 Two alternative models of Federalism 4.2 A national venue for bargaining 4.3 Within versus without 4.4 Direct versus delegated representation 4.5 Other parameters of design 4.6 Bilateral decision making and the case of Russia 5. Incentives: 5.1 Institutional enforcement 5.2 The court 5.3 Some simple rules of constitutional design 5.4 Voters versus elites 5.5 Desirable imperfection and a democratic as if principle 6. Political parties in a federal state: 6.1 An extreme hypothesis 6.2 Parties in a democracy 6.3 The idealized party system 6.4 Integrated parties 6.5 Integration outside the United States Australian Federalism and the role of parties Canada 6.6 India Leadership incentives Rank and file incentives The party and Federalism 1967 and thereafter 7. Institutional sources of federal stability I: 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Level 2 and the federalist 7.3 Level 3 institutions 7.4 Australia, Canada, Germany, and India revisited Germany Canada Canada vs Australia and India 7.3 Local and regional design parameters 8. Institutional sources of federal stability II: 8.1 Electoral mechanisms and societal structures Representation Ethnicity Defining federal subjects Number of local jurisdictions Authority over local governments 8.2 Bicameralism Symmetry Presidential authority Presidential selection Electoral connections 8.3 Level 1 and the scope of the federal mandate 8.4 Level 0 - things beyond design 9. Designing Federalism: 9.1 Russia Electoral arrangements Regional autonomy Constitutional matters Parties and the current status quo 9.2 The European Union Background The role of parties The puzzle of the collusion France versus Britain EU institutional design 9.4 Conclusion.

306 citations

Book
29 Aug 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, some concepts and how they apply to Russia are discussed and some symptoms of the failure of democracy in the country and the structural and institutional problems of the Russian regime.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. Some concepts and how they apply to Russia 3. Symptoms of the failure of democracy 4. The Russian condition in global perspective 5. The structural problem: grease and glitter 6. The policy problem: economic statism 7. The institutional problem: superpresidentialism 8. Can democracy get back on track?

265 citations

Book
20 Dec 2010
TL;DR: The Politics of Protest in Hybrid Regimes as discussed by the authors builds on previously unpublished data and extensive fieldwork in Russia to show how one high-profile hybrid regime manages political competition in the workplace and in the streets.
Abstract: Since the end of the Cold War, more and more countries feature political regimes that are neither liberal democracies nor closed authoritarian systems. Most research on these hybrid regimes focuses on how elites manipulate elections to stay in office, but in places as diverse as Bolivia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Serbia, Thailand, Ukraine and Venezuela, protest in the streets has been at least as important as elections in bringing about political change. The Politics of Protest in Hybrid Regimes builds on previously unpublished data and extensive fieldwork in Russia to show how one high-profile hybrid regime manages political competition in the workplace and in the streets. More generally, the book develops a theory of how the nature of organizations in society, state strategies for mobilizing supporters, and elite competition shape political protest in hybrid regimes.

197 citations