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Jemimah Irvin

Bio: Jemimah Irvin is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Visual communication & Service design. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 4 citations.

Papers
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05 Jul 2018
TL;DR: In this article, a case study of a visual communication honors research project that is indicative of those opportunities and the potential benefits of having highly skilled visual practitioners involved in human centered and service design processes is presented.
Abstract: Over the past 20 years there has been an increase in post-secondary visual communication education in Australia while the growth of the industry itself has been low, meaning an increasing number of graduates compete for a limited pool of jobs1. The use of visualisation in human centered and service design approaches provides alternative employment opportunities for these graduates. This paper presents a case study of a visual communication honors research project that is indicative of those opportunities and the potential benefits of having highly skilled visual practitioners involved in human centered and service design processes. Furthermore, we argue that a consideration of the aesthetics of the visualisation methods used in this context is essential and that visual aesthetics should be a significant part of the service design skillset.

4 citations


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06 Jul 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyse the contributions to the learning and practicing track of ServDes and categorise them by identifying convergences and defining six emerging topics, which can be summarised in a few directions: 1) beyond learning where more and more, service designers are explicitly or implicitly requested to play the role of educators within organisations; 2) beyond human centred design where the need to better understand the role and the interaction with non-human agents.
Abstract: The paper analyses the contributions to the “learning and practicing’ track of “ServDes.2018 Proof of Concept” and categorises them by identifying convergences and defining six emerging topics. As a result, new roles and responsibilities emerge. They can be summarised in a few directions: 1) beyond learning where more and more, service designers are explicitly or implicitly requested to play the role of educators within organisations; 2) beyond human centred design – where the need to better understand the role of and the interaction with ‘non-human agents’ emerges; 3) beyond organisational change – where the transformational role of design seems to expand from within organisations to the relationships that organisations establish with external actors.

8 citations