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Jennifer V. Evans

Bio: Jennifer V. Evans is an academic researcher from Carleton University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Queer & Cultural history. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 19 publications receiving 94 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors discusses the challenges faced by officials responsible for identifying policing and prosecuting callboys and their clients known as johns and examines some of the twists and turns that characterized the process of regulating homosexual sex in postwar Berlin.
Abstract: This essay discusses the challenges faced by officials responsible for identifying policing and prosecuting callboys and their clients known as johns and examines some of the twists and turns that characterized the process of regulating homosexual sex in postwar Berlin. A careful reading of newly available police and court documents demonstrates not simply the confusion that Berliners faced in defining societal values at the war’s end but the contours of a defiant homosexual subculture one that had not been completely destroyed by Hitler and that was being restored to public view by the disorder of daily life. (excerpt)

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

21 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2011

21 citations


Cited by
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Book
30 Apr 2018
TL;DR: Liskova as discussed by the authors reveals how important aspects of sexuality were already liberated during the 1950s - abortion was legalized, homosexuality decriminalized, the female orgasm came into experts' focus - and all that was underscored by an emphasis on gender equality.
Abstract: This is the first account of sexual liberation in Eastern Europe during the Cold War. Kateřina Liskova reveals how, in the case of Czechoslovakia, important aspects of sexuality were already liberated during the 1950s - abortion was legalized, homosexuality decriminalized, the female orgasm came into experts' focus - and all that was underscored by an emphasis on gender equality. However, with the coming of Normalization, gender discourses reversed and women were to aspire to be caring mothers and docile wives. Good sex was to cement a lasting marriage and family. In contrast to the usual Western accounts highlighting the importance of social movements to sexual and gender freedom, here we discover, through the analysis of rich archival sources covering forty years of state socialism in Czechoslovakia, how experts, including sexologists, demographers, and psychologists, advised the state on population development, marriage and the family to shape the most intimate aspects of people's lives.

60 citations