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Jens-Erik Mai

Bio: Jens-Erik Mai is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Information behavior. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 41 citations.

Papers
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29 Apr 2016
TL;DR: The 4th edition of this popular text presents a comprehensive review of over a century of research on information behavior, and includes significant structural and content changes from earlier editions.
Abstract: The 4th edition of this popular text presents a comprehensive review of over a century of research on information behavior. It is intended for students in information studies and disciplines interested in research on information activities. Now co-authored, this new text includes significant structural and content changes from earlier editions.

47 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: According to a bibliometric and network analysis, there is a small number of authors who can be considered to be the most productive and who publish regularly, and a large number of transient ones.
Abstract: There has been an increase in research published on information behavior in recent years, and this has been accompanied by an increase in its diversity and interaction with other fields, particularly information retrieval. The aims of this study are to determine which researchers have contributed to producing the current body of knowledge on this subject, and to describe its intellectual basis. A bibliometric and network analysis was applied to authorship and co-authorship as well as citation and co-citation. According to these analyses, there is a small number of authors who can be considered to be the most productive and who publish regularly, and a large number of transient ones. Other findings reveal a marked predominance of theoretical works, some examples of qualitative methodology that originate in other areas of social science, and a high incidence of research focused on the user interaction with information retrieval systems and the information behavior of doctors.

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The model provides practical insights into the behaviour of both users and providers of information and the factors that influence them and can be used to identify ways in which information behaviour may be positively modified in ...
Abstract: Purpose – This study investigated the application in the field of healthcare of a recently developed model of information seeking and communication. The purpose of this paper is to test the model’s validity and to identify insights that it may provide. Design/methodology/approach – To investigate the model’s application to information users, the findings from published literature on physicians’ information behaviour were studied. To investigate its application to information providers, interviews were carried out with staff working for the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and with employees of pharmaceutical companies. The findings were examined using deductive content analysis. Findings – The findings endorse the validity of the model, with minor modifications. The model provides practical insights into the behaviour of both users and providers of information and the factors that influence them. It can be used to identify ways in which information behaviour may be positively modified in ...

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a user and use-based model is proposed to represent the information context and perspectives of small businesses in the state of Tennessee as a case study in order to apply the lessons and insights to other parts of the United States.
Abstract: People living in the Appalachian region, including its rural areas, face challenging economic, social, and cultural conditions with limited financial opportunities, information poverty and unemployment, and low levels of information literacy and educational attainment. The roles played by rural public libraries in small business economic development in this region require exploratory study of representative small businesses to refocus library services and resources on their information needs and information-seeking experiences. This article proposes a user- and use-based model to represent the information context and perspectives of such businesses in the state of Tennessee as a case study in order to apply the lessons and insights to other parts of the United States. It concludes with suggestions for the blueprint design of a public library small business tool kit, an ideal resource that Tennessee’s rural public libraries can develop for small businesses in the future.

28 citations

Dissertation
01 Jun 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, cultural historical activity theory, underpinned by critical realism and supported by repertory grid technique and constant comparative method, is used to interpret data from two local authority case studies to address the following questions: what is the information behaviour of project teams involved in local government construction projects at concept stage?
Abstract: This research seeks to understand how teams involved in large complex construction projects share and use information. The context of the research is project team information behaviour within early stage UK local government projects. Project tasks are commonly undertaken in a collaborative manner, modified by situational factors which give rise to informational activities which are recognised as information behaviour. However, there is limited research on collaborative information behaviour, especially focussed on activity in the complex and politically driven environment found within local government. Furthermore, information behaviour at the concept stage may be strategic as it will help to determine major decisions that may have considerable implications (e.g. financial or political), it has long term consequences and it affects the information behaviour of others through the leveraging of power and influence. Cultural historical activity theory, underpinned by critical realism and supported by repertory grid technique and constant comparative method, is used to interpret data from two local authority case studies to address the following questions: ‘What is the information behaviour of project teams involved in local government construction projects at concept stage?’ and ‘What contradictions and congruencies influence the intervening variables that shape information behaviour within the project teams of local government construction projects?’ Contradictions within the project activity system, in particular between the socio-political and the technical domains, cause dysfunctionality. Established project information structures cannot readily cope with this dysfunctionality and, as a result, information behaviour, hidden and overt, creates new structures and shapes micro-political activity not anticipated by project method. As such, the research uncovered significant tensions within the teams’ work activity which caused ambiguity, leading to the creation of ‘information spheres’, where information can be exchanged and nurtured - sheltered from political interventions and to project teams which are invisible to the project board. Where these tensions are not present, information exchange is enabled by value alignment and trust leading to big rooms and extended project teams, where authority is distributed to enable improvements to information exchange. The research also posits a model of project team information behaviour and seeks to make modest contributions to both the information behaviour and project management canon.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: Semistructured qualitative interviews with search staff from the defense, pharmaceutical, and aerospace sectors indicates the potential transferability of the finding that organizations may not know their search expertise levels.
Abstract: No prior research has been identified that investigates the causal factors for workplace exploratory search task performance. The impact of user, task, and environmental factors on user satisfaction and task performance was investigated through a mixed methods study with 26 experienced information professionals using enterprise search in an oil and gas enterprise. Some participants found 75% of high-value items, others found none, with an average of 27%. No association was found between self-reported search expertise and task performance, with a tendency for many participants to overestimate their search expertise. Successful searchers may have more accurate mental models of both search systems and the information space. Organizations may not have effective exploratory search task performance feedback loops, a lack of learning. This may be caused by management bias towards technology, not capability, a lack of systems thinking. Furthermore, organizations may not "know" they "don't know" their true level of search expertise, a lack of knowing. A metamodel is presented identifying the causal factors for workplace exploratory search task performance. Semistructured qualitative interviews with search staff from the defense, pharmaceutical, and aerospace sectors indicates the potential transferability of the finding that organizations may not know their search expertise levels.

26 citations