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Jerry Thomas

Bio: Jerry Thomas is an academic researcher from University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh. The author has contributed to research in topics: Political socialization & Queer. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 14 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors used a pre-post survey design to find out how classroom experiences affect students' attitudes about voter registration and found that students in the experimental group became much less sanguine about the ease of registration and the ability of most citizens to correctly navigate the process, yet became more confident in the voter registration process in general.
Abstract: In a democracy, agents of political socialization, such as schools and parents, generally emphasize the importance of voting. While college students may be exposed briefly to voter registration as a barrier to participation, there is little evidence that the topic is given serious attention in the classroom. This research addresses how classroom experiences affect students' attitudes about voter registration by employing a quasi-experimental, pre-post survey design. The experimental stimulus was a course assignment in which students completed voter registration applications under four scenarios designed to simulate different circumstances frequently encountered by college students. The students in the experimental group became much less sanguine about the ease of registration and the ability of most citizens to correctly navigate the process, yet became more confident in the voter registration process in general. This raises interesting questions about how attitudes about the political process are shaped ...

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors characterizes queer methods developed in the humanities in ways that may be useful in social science and law, since it is antithetical to queer theory's resistance to fixity to concretize.
Abstract: This note characterizes queer methods developed in the humanities in ways that may be useful in social science and law. Since it is antithetical to queer theory’s resistance to fixity to concretize...

11 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In 2002, a distinguished group of the nation's most respected educational scholars and practitioners gathered in Washington, D.C. to discuss the fact that increasing numbers of Americans are disengaging from civic and political activity as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In 2002, a distinguished group of the nation’s most respected educational scholars and practitioners gathered in Washington, D.C. to discuss the fact that increasing numbers of Americans are disengaging from civic and political activity. Representing diverse political views, disciplines, and approaches, these educators shared a common vision of a richer, more comprehensive approach to civic education in the United States. The Civic Mission of Schools is a powerful statement of that vision. To expedite their vision, participants set about to identify goals, approaches, and recommendations to support civic-engagement principles. Adopting the premise that the overall goal of civic education should be to help young people gain and apply citizenship skills, knowledge, and attitudes, The Civic Mission of Schools also found that competent and responsible citizens: • Are informed and thoughtful. They appreciate history and American democratic processes, understand community issues, think critically, understand diverse perspectives, and more. • Participate in their communities. • Act politically. They have the skills, knowledge, and commitment to address social issues, speak in public, influence public policy, and more. • Have moral and civic virtues. They are concerned for the rights and welfare of others, are socially responsible, strike a balance between self-interest and the common good, and more. The Civic Mission of Schools also recognizes that civic engagement can be especially difficult for young people who lack resources and are often discouraged from participating. Thus an essential goal of civic engagement is to provide skills, knowledge, and encouragement for all students. The civic-education programs featured in Profiles (See pages 4–11) are intended to provide educators with living examples of the six Promising Approaches recommended by The Civic Mission of Schools.

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Gimpel and Schuknecht as discussed by the authors studied the role of pre-adults in the development of political socialization in the United States, and found that the focus of these studies was on the former Soviet Union and the appearance of transitional and new democracies around the globe.
Abstract: Cultivating Democracy: Civic Environments and Political Socialization in America. By James G. Gimpel, J. Celeste Lay, and Jason E. Schuknecht. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 2003. 278p. $32.95. Scholarly studies of political socialization began a dramatic decline during the mid-1970s. One source of this downward spiral lay in the dwindling novelty of studying pre-adults. Political scientists are accustomed to dealing with the “real world” of politics, one occupied and ruled by adults. After a prolonged lull, research began to increase in the 1990s and has continued onward. One driving force in this renewal stems from the decline in civic virtue among upcoming cohorts said to characterize most Western countries. A second influence was the crumbling of the former Soviet Union and the appearance of transitional and new democracies around the globe. In an effort to understand each of these developments and to propose possible solutions, a variety of institutions and scholars have returned to the question of citizenship development, often with the intention of improving the inculcation of civic virtue among the young.

97 citations

Book
20 Feb 2020
TL;DR: For example, this article found that those with non-cognitive skills related to self-regulation are more likely to overcome internal and external barriers to participation in political decision making, and that political apathy is not the reason for low voter turnout.
Abstract: In 2016, 90% of young Americans reported an interest in politics. 80% intended to vote. Yet only 43% of people between the ages of 18 and 29 ended up actually casting a ballot. Making Young Voters investigates what lies at the core of this gap. The authors' in-depth, interdisciplinary approach reveals that political apathy is not the reason for low levels of youth turnout. Rather, young people too often fail to follow through on their political interests and intentions. Those with 'noncognitive' skills related to self-regulation are more likely to overcome internal and external barriers to participation. This book combines theory from psychology, economics, child development, and more to explore possible solutions rooted in civic education and electoral reform. This potentially paradigm-shifting contribution to the literature of American politics serves to influence not only our understanding of voter turnout, but also the fundamental connections between the education system, electoral institutions, and individual civic behavior in a democracy. How young people vote affects not only each individual future, but that of the United States, and of us all.

41 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2018
Abstract: ................................................................................................................................................. iii Acknowledgements ................................................................................................................................. v Table of contents ................................................................................................................................... vi List of tables and figures ...................................................................................................................... viii Chapter 1: Election administration, barriers to voting and voter turnout: definitions, research questions and design .............................................................................................................................. 1 1.1. Introducing election administration ............................................................................................ 1 1.2. Research questions ...................................................................................................................... 9 1.3. Approaches, methods and limitations ....................................................................................... 12 1.4 Outline of the thesis .................................................................................................................... 15 Chapter 2: An embarrassment of riches: what do we know about election administration, barriers to voting, costs of voting and voter turnout? ........................................................................................... 19 2.1. Theoretical underpinnings: why worry about turnout and barriers to voting? ........................ 19 2.2. The foundations: old institutionalism and rational behaviourism ............................................ 24 2.3. The changing world: the advent of new institutionalism .......................................................... 28 2.4. Rational choice institutionalism ................................................................................................. 31 2.5. Historical institutionalism .......................................................................................................... 33 2.6. Sociological institutionalism ...................................................................................................... 35 Chapter 3: What are the costs of voting? ............................................................................................. 40 3.1. The costs of voting as seen by Downs and other academics ..................................................... 40 3.2. Building a list of costs of voting ................................................................................................. 45 3.3. The costs of voting as seen by practitioners: convenience voting ............................................ 51 3.4. The broader picture: outside influences on the costs of voting ................................................ 61 3.5. Costs of voting: a multidimensional model ............................................................................... 65 Chapter 4: Applying new institutionalism to the study of voting costs ................................................ 67 4.1. Linking theory and research design ........................................................................................... 67 4.2. Comparing case studies and the choice of cases ....................................................................... 72 4.3. Qualitative fieldwork: focus groups and interviews .................................................................. 79 4.4. Quantitative deskwork: cluster analysis and composite indicator construction ....................... 86 Chapter 5: Introducing cases: relevant institutions in New Zealand and Sweden ............................... 91 5.1. History, voter registration and privacy of data .......................................................................... 91 5.2. Welfare state and the relationship between the citizens and the state ................................... 97 5.3. Migration and integration ........................................................................................................ 100

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The following story is an introduction to an interesting exploration of the concept of shame, providing new insights into this important notion through the humanbecoming theoretical process of concept inventing.
Abstract: The following story is an introduction to an interesting exploration of the concept of shame, providing new insights into this important notion through the humanbecoming theoretical process of concept inventing.

17 citations