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Jianqiang Yin

Bio: Jianqiang Yin is an academic researcher from Chinese Academy of Sciences. The author has contributed to research in topics: Monsoon & Continental shelf. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 22 publications receiving 334 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Environmental factors, phytoplankton biomass (Chl a) and primary production of two water areas in Daya Bay were investigated during the transition period from spring to summer, including high values of DO, nitrate and silicate.

97 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Based on the high-resolution in situ and remote sensing data, this paper examined in details the spatial patterns of phytoplankton biomass and primary production in the coast of NWSCS in summer and discussed the underline physical processes involved.

51 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the distribution and abundance of thaliaceans were studied in relation to physical and biological variables during summer and winter in the northwest continental shelf of South China Sea.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 Sep 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the authors studied the effect of monsoon, coastal current and temperature on the distribution and seasonal variations of Calanus sinicus abundance and found that the abundance of C sinicus varied seasonally and regionally.
Abstract: The effect of monsoon, coastal current and temperature on the distribution and seasonal variations of Calanus sinicus abundance were studied. The samples from the northwest continental shelf of South China Sea were collected with 505 mu m planktonic nets from July 2006 to October 2007. The abundance of C sinicus made up 34.28% and 12.34% of all copepods in spring and summer, respectively. The distribution of C. sinicus varied seasonally and regionally. The distribution of C. sinicus ranged between east inshore and offshore waters from the Leizhou Peninsula to Hainan Island, with a mean of 23.00 (+/- 77.78) ind. m(-3) in spring. In summer it had a mean of 13.74 (+/- 45.10) ind. m(-3) occurring only in the east inshore waters from Leizhou Peninsula to Hainan Island. C. sinicus was not abundant during autumn and winter seasons. The surveyed area was divided into three sub-regions based on topographical analysis and water mass, region I (included the east inshore waters of Leizhou Peninsula), region II (included the east inshore waters of Hainan Island) and region III (included the offshore waters from Leizhou Peninsula to Hainan Island). The average abundance of C. sinicus within region I was determined to be 115.63 (+/- 145.93) and 68.12 (+/- 84.00) ind. m(-3) in spring and summer, respectively, values higher than those of regions II and III. Our findings suggested that C. sinicus was transported from the East China Sea to the northwest continental shelf of South China Sea by the Guangdong Coastal Current, which was driven by the northeast monsoon in spring. The presence of a cold eddy, in addition to coastal upwelling driven by the southwest monsoon, provided suitable survival conditions for C. sinicus in summer. This species disappeared in autumn due to high temperatures (> 27 degrees C) and did not begin to enter into the northwest continental shelf of South China Sea from the East China Sea during the period of investigation in winter. The frequency of C sinicus was low in region III during the year as a result of the South China Sea Warm Current and pelagic waters with high temperature during the spring and summer months. Crown Copyright (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Both nutrient levels and currents in SCS may play important roles in determining the composition and distribution of microalgae in Zhubi Reef and SCS.

25 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Data collected from 12 marine monitoring stations in Daya Bay from 1982 to 2004 reveal a substantial change in the ecological environment of this region.

172 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Cluster analysis, principal component analysis and the fuzzy logic approach revealed more information about the temporal and spatial patterns of the trophic status of water quality.

120 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors summarized knowledge regarding dissolved nutrient loading from marine fish farms around the world, direct impacts on water quality and secondary impacts on primary production, including forma- tion of harmful algal blooms.
Abstract: Increasing human population and reliance on aquaculture for seafood will lead to expansion of the industry in the open ocean. To guide environmentally sustainable expansion, coastal stakeholders require tools to evaluate the risks that marine aquaculture poses and to craft science-based policies and practices which safeguard marine ecosystems. We summarized cur- rent knowledge regarding dissolved nutrient loading from marine fish farms around the world, direct impacts on water quality and secondary impacts on primary production, including forma- tion of harmful algal blooms. We found that modern operating conditions have minimized impacts of individual fish farms on marine water quality. Effects on dissolved oxygen and turbidity are largely eliminated through better management. Nutrient enrichment of the near-field water col- umn is not detectable beyond 100 m of a farm when formulated feeds are used, and feed waste is minimized. We highlight the role of siting fish farms in deep waters with sufficient current to dis- perse nutrients and prevent water quality impacts. We extensively discuss the potential for advances in integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) to assimilate waste nutrients. Although modern farm management practices have decreased environmental effects of marine fish farms, we conclude that questions remain about the additive impacts of discharge from multiple farms potentially leading to increased primary production and eutrophication. Research results on sec- ondary effects upon primary production are highly variable. In some locations, nutrient loading has little or no trophic impact, while at others there is evidence that nutrients are assimilated by primary producers. Research on far-field and regional processes, especially in intensively farmed areas and over longer time scales, will refine understanding of the full ecological role of fish farms in marine environments.

117 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wang et al. as discussed by the authors have monitored 12 stations to study the effects caused by natural, marine and anthropogenic activities on water quality in Daya Bay, China, and found that the nutrient structure may be related to anthropogenic influence.
Abstract: In this work, we have monitored 12 stations to study the effects caused by natural, marine and anthropogenic activities on water quality in Daya Bay, China. Results show that the N:P ratios are 71.54, 41.29, 81.50 and 98.27 in winter, spring, summer and autumn, respectively. Compared with the data of the past 20 years, the atomic N:P ratios have increased, indicating increased potential for P limitation; the atomic Si:N ratios have decreased; the nutrient structure has substantially changed over a period of 20 years. These findings show that the nutrient structure may be related to anthropogenic influence. The data matrix has been built according to the results, which were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). This analysis extracted the first four principal components (PC), explaining 73.58% of the total variance of the raw data. PC1 (25.53% of the variance) is associated with temperature, salinity and nitrate. PC2 (21.64% of the variance) is characterized by dissolved oxygen and silicate. PC3 (15.91% of the variance) participates mainly by nitrite (NO2-N) and ammonia (NH4-N). PC4 explaining 10.50% of the variance is mainly contributed by parameters of organic pollution (dissolved oxygen, 5-day biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand). PCA has found the important factors that can describe the natural, marine and anthropogenic influences. Temperature and salinity are important indicators of natural and marine characters in this bay. The northeast monsoons from October to April and southwest monsoons from May to September have important effects on the waters in Daya Bay. It has been demonstrated that anthropogenic activities have significant influence on nitrogen form character. In spatial pattern, a marine aquaculture area and a non-aquaculture area are widely identified by the scores of stations. In seasonal pattern, dry and wet season characters have been demonstrated. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

111 citations