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Author

節夫 有川

Other affiliations: Kyushu Institute of Technology
Bio: 節夫 有川 is an academic researcher from Kyushu University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Formal system & Grammar systems theory. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 25 publications receiving 617 citations. Previous affiliations of 節夫 有川 include Kyushu Institute of Technology.

Papers
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01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: In this article, the Shift-And algorithm was used to solve the problem of pattern matching in LZW compressed text, where a pattern length is at most 32 or the word length.
Abstract: This paper considers the Shift-And approach to the problem of pattern matching in LZW compressed text, and gives a new algorithm that solves it. The algorithm is indeed fast when a pattern length is at most 32, or the word length. After an O(m + |Σ|) time and O(|Σ|) space preprocessing of a pattern, it scans an LZW compressed text in O(n + r) time and reports all occurrences of the pattern, where n is the compressed text length, m is the pattern length, and r is the number of the pattern occurrences. Experimental results show that it runs approximately 1.5 times faster than a decompression followed by a simple search using the Shift-And algorithm. Moreover, the algorithm can be extended to the generalized pattern matching, to the pattern matching with k mismatches, and to the multiple pattern matching, like the Shift-And algorithm.

56 citations

01 May 2001
TL;DR: This paper presents a polynomial time learning algorithm for µ-OGT, the subclass of OGT without repeated tree variables, and gives representation-independent hardness results which indicate that both of equivalence and membership queries are necessary to learn µ- OGT.
Abstract: This paper studies the polynomial-time learnability of the classes of ordered gapped tree patterns (OGT) and ordered gapped forests (OGF) under the into-matching semantics in the query learning model of Angluin. The class OGT is a model of semi-structured database query languages, and a generalization of both the class of ordered/unordered tree pattern languages and the class of non-erasing regular pattern languages. First, we present a polynomial time learning algorithm for µ-OGT, the subclass of OGT without repeated tree variables, using equivalence queries and membership queries. By extending this algorithm, we present polynomial time learning algorithms for the classes µ-OGF of forests without repeated variables and OGT of trees with repeated variables using equivalence queries and subset queries. We also give representation-independent hardness results which indicate that both of equivalence and membership queries are necessary to learn µ-OGT.

36 citations


Cited by
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
09 Dec 2002
TL;DR: A novel algorithm called gSpan (graph-based substructure pattern mining), which discovers frequent substructures without candidate generation by building a new lexicographic order among graphs, and maps each graph to a unique minimum DFS code as its canonical label.
Abstract: We investigate new approaches for frequent graph-based pattern mining in graph datasets and propose a novel algorithm called gSpan (graph-based substructure pattern mining), which discovers frequent substructures without candidate generation. gSpan builds a new lexicographic order among graphs, and maps each graph to a unique minimum DFS code as its canonical label. Based on this lexicographic order gSpan adopts the depth-first search strategy to mine frequent connected subgraphs efficiently. Our performance study shows that gSpan substantially outperforms previous algorithms, sometimes by an order of magnitude.

2,282 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper surveys existing work on decision tree construction, attempting to identify the important issues involved, directions the work has taken and the current state of the art.
Abstract: Decision trees have proved to be valuable tools for the description, classification and generalization of data. Work on constructing decision trees from data exists in multiple disciplines such as statistics, pattern recognition, decision theory, signal processing, machine learning and artificial neural networks. Researchers in these disciplines, sometimes working on quite different problems, identified similar issues and heuristics for decision tree construction. This paper surveys existing work on decision tree construction, attempting to identify the important issues involved, directions the work has taken and the current state of the art.

1,044 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
24 Aug 2003
TL;DR: A closed graph pattern mining algorithm, CloseGraph, is developed by exploring several interesting pruning methods and shows that it not only dramatically reduces unnecessary subgraphs to be generated but also substantially increases the efficiency of mining, especially in the presence of large graph patterns.
Abstract: Recent research on pattern discovery has progressed form mining frequent itemsets and sequences to mining structured patterns including trees, lattices, and graphs. As a general data structure, graph can model complicated relations among data with wide applications in bioinformatics, Web exploration, and etc. However, mining large graph patterns in challenging due to the presence of an exponential number of frequent subgraphs. Instead of mining all the subgraphs, we propose to mine closed frequent graph patterns. A graph g is closed in a database if there exists no proper supergraph of g that has the same support as g. A closed graph pattern mining algorithm, CloseGraph, is developed by exploring several interesting pruning methods. Our performance study shows that CloseGraph not only dramatically reduces unnecessary subgraphs to be generated but also substantially increases the efficiency of mining, especially in the presence of large graph patterns.

722 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work has succeeded in finding rules whose prediction accuracies come close to that of TargetP, while still retaining a very simple and interpretable form.
Abstract: Motivation: The prediction of localization sites of various proteins is an important and challenging problem in the field of molecular biology. TargetP, by Emanuelsson et al. (J. Mol. Biol., 300, 1005‐1016, 2000) is a neural network based system which is currently the best predictor in the literature for N-terminal sorting signals. One drawback of neural networks, however, is that it is generally difficult to understand and interpret how and why they make such predictions. In this paper, we aim to generate simple and interpretable rules as predictors, and still achieve a practical prediction accuracy. We adopt an approach which consists of an extensive search for simple rules and various attributes which is partially guided by human intuition. Results: We have succeeded in finding rules whose prediction accuracies come close to that of TargetP, while still retaining a very simple and interpretable form. We also discuss and interpret the discovered rules. Availability: An (experimental) web service using rules obtained by our method is provided at http:

721 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results show that despite the underlying complexity associated with frequent subgraph discovery, FSG is effective in finding all frequently occurring subgraphs in data sets containing more than 200,000 graph transactions and scales linearly with respect to the size of the data set.
Abstract: Over the years, frequent itemset discovery algorithms have been used to find interesting patterns in various application areas. However, as data mining techniques are being increasingly applied to nontraditional domains, existing frequent pattern discovery approaches cannot be used. This is because the transaction framework that is assumed by these algorithms cannot be used to effectively model the data sets in these domains. An alternate way of modeling the objects in these data sets is to represent them using graphs. Within that model, one way of formulating the frequent pattern discovery problem is that of discovering subgraphs that occur frequently over the entire set of graphs. We present a computationally efficient algorithm, called FSG, for finding all frequent subgraphs in large graph data sets. We experimentally evaluate the performance of FSG using a variety of real and synthetic data sets. Our results show that despite the underlying complexity associated with frequent subgraph discovery, FSG is effective in finding all frequently occurring subgraphs in data sets containing more than 200,000 graph transactions and scales linearly with respect to the size of the data set.

390 citations