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Jillian Hamilton

Bio: Jillian Hamilton is an academic researcher from Queensland University of Technology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Interaction design & Higher education. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 30 publications receiving 186 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a connective model of exegesis is proposed, which allows the researcher to both situate their creative practice within a trajectory of research and do justice to its personally invested poetics.
Abstract: Since the formal recognition of practice-led research in the 1990s, many higher research degree candidates in art, design and media have submitted creative works along with an accompanying written document or ‘exegesis’ for examination. Various models for the exegesis have been proposed in university guidelines and academic texts during the past decade, and students and supervisors have experimented with its contents and structure. With a substantial number of exegeses submitted and archived, it has now become possible to move beyond proposition to empirical analysis. In this article we present the findings of a content analysis of a large, local sample of submitted exegeses. We identify the emergence of a persistent pattern in the types of content included as well as overall structure. Besides an introduction and conclusion, this pattern includes three main parts, which can be summarized as situating concepts (conceptual definitions and theories); precedents of practice (traditions and exemplars in the field); and researcher’s creative practice (the creative process, the artifacts produced and their value as research). We argue that this model combines earlier approaches to the exegesis, which oscillated between academic objectivity, by providing a contextual framework for the practice, and personal reflexivity, by providing commentary on the creative practice. But this model is more than simply a hybrid: it provides a dual orientation, which allows the researcher to both situate their creative practice within a trajectory of research and do justice to its personally invested poetics. By performing the important function of connecting the practice and creative work to a wider emergent field, the model helps to support claims for a research contribution to the field. We call it a connective model of exegesis.

37 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors extend the outcome of empirical research into how a distributed leadership approach can be enabled and evaluated in Australian higher education to analyse the effectiveness of these processes for both measuring output and assessing the impact and influence of practice.
Abstract: Higher education is under pressure to advance from a singular focus on assessment of outputs (measurements) to encompass the impact (influence) of initiatives across all aspects of academic endeavour (research, learning and teaching, and leadership). This paper focuses on the implications of this shift for leadership in higher education. Demonstrating the impact of leadership in higher education requires taking a step beyond measuring the skills, behaviours, and achievements of individual leaders to demonstrating how universities can evaluate the impact of actions taken to build leadership capacity across the institution. The authors extend the outcome of empirical research into how a distributed leadership approach can be enabled and evaluated in Australian higher education – to analyse the effectiveness of these processes for both measuring output and assessing the impact and influence of practice.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Sessional Academic Success (SAS) program as discussed by the authors is a new framework that complements and extends the central academic development program for sessional academic staff at Queensland University of Technology.
Abstract: With approximately half of Australian university teaching now performed by sessional academics, there has been growing recognition of the contribution they make to student learning. At the same time, sector-wide research and institutional audits continue to raise concerns about academic development, quality assurance, recognition and belonging. In response, universities have increasingly begun to offer academic development programs for sessional academics. However, such programs may be centrally delivered, generic in nature, and contained within the moment of delivery, while the Faculty contexts and cultures that sessional academics work within are diverse, and the need for support unfolds in ad-hoc and often unpredictable ways. In this paper we present the Sessional Academic Success (SAS) program–a new framework that complements and extends the central academic development program for sessional academic staff at Queensland University of Technology. This program recognises that experienced sessional academics have much to contribute to the advancement of learning and teaching, and harnesses their expertise to provide school-based academic development opportunities, peer-to-peer support, and locally contextualized community building. We describe the program’s implementation and explain how Sessional Academic Success Advisors (SASAs) are employed, trained and supported to provide advice and mentorship and, through a co-design methodology, to develop local development opportunities and communities of teaching practice within their schools. Besides anticipated benefits to new sessional academics in terms of timely and contextual support and improved sense of belonging, we explain how SAS provides a pathway for building leadership capacity and academic advancement for experienced sessional academics. We take a collaborative, dialogic and reflective practice approach to this paper, interlacing insights from the Associate Director, Academic: Sessional Development who designed the program, and two Sessional Academic Success Advisors who have piloted it within their schools.

21 citations

01 Nov 2009
TL;DR: This paper considers avatars from the perspectives of critical theory, visual communication, and art theory (on portraiture) to help elucidate the role of avatars as an expression of identity.
Abstract: Avatars perform a complex range of inter-related functions. They not only allow us to express a digital identity, they facilitate the expression of physical motility and, through non-verbal expression, help to mediate social interaction in networked environments. When well designed, they can contribute to a sense of “presence” (a sense of being there) and a sense of “co-presence” (a sense of being there with others) in digital space. Because of this complexity, the study of avatars can be enriched by theoretical insights from a range of disciplines. This paper considers avatars from the perspectives of critical theory, visual communication, and art theory (on portraiture) to help elucidate the role of avatars as an expression of identity. It goes on to argue that identification with an avatar is also produced through their expression of motility and discusses the benefits of film theory for explaining this process. Conceding the limits of this approach, the paper draws on philosophies of body image, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) theory on embodied interaction, and fields as diverse as dance to explain the sense of identification, immersion, presence and co-presence that avatars can produce.

20 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Nov 2009
TL;DR: This paper argues that it might combine practices of locative media (experiential mapping and geo-spatial annotation) with aspects of online participatory culture (uploading, file-sharing and search categorization) to produce online applications that support geographically 'located' communities.
Abstract: The trans-locative potential of the Internet has driven the design of many online applications. Online communities largely cluster around topics of interest, which take precedence over participants' geographical locations. The site of production is often disregarded when creative content appears online. However, for some, a sense of place is a defining aspect of creativity. Yet environments that focus on the display and sharing of regionally situated content have, so far, been largely overlooked.Recent developments in geo-technologies have precipitated the emergence of a new field of interactive media. Entitled locative media, it emphasizes the geographical context of media. This paper argues that we might combine practices of locative media (experiential mapping and geo-spatial annotation) with aspects of online participatory culture (uploading, file-sharing and search categorization) to produce online applications that support geographically 'located' communities. It discusses the design considerations and possibilities of this convergence, making reference to an example, OurPlace 3G to 3D, which has to date been developed as a prototype. It goes on to discuss the benefits and potential uses of such convergent applications, including the co-production of spatial-temporal narratives of place.

16 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, Sherry Turkle uses Internet MUDs (multi-user domains, or in older gaming parlance multi-user dungeons) as a launching pad for explorations of software design, user interfaces, simulation, artificial intelligence, artificial life, agents, virtual reality, and the on-line way of life.
Abstract: From the Publisher: A Question of Identity Life on the Screen is a fascinating and wide-ranging investigation of the impact of computers and networking on society, peoples' perceptions of themselves, and the individual's relationship to machines. Sherry Turkle, a Professor of the Sociology of Science at MIT and a licensed psychologist, uses Internet MUDs (multi-user domains, or in older gaming parlance multi-user dungeons) as a launching pad for explorations of software design, user interfaces, simulation, artificial intelligence, artificial life, agents, "bots," virtual reality, and "the on-line way of life." Turkle's discussion of postmodernism is particularly enlightening. She shows how postmodern concepts in art, architecture, and ethics are related to concrete topics much closer to home, for example AI research (Minsky's "Society of Mind") and even MUDs (exemplified by students with X-window terminals who are doing homework in one window and simultaneously playing out several different roles in the same MUD in other windows). Those of you who have (like me) been turned off by the shallow, pretentious, meaningless paintings and sculptures that litter our museums of modern art may have a different perspective after hearing what Turkle has to say. This is a psychoanalytical book, not a technical one. However, software developers and engineers will find it highly accessible because of the depth of the author's technical understanding and credibility. Unlike most other authors in this genre, Turkle does not constantly jar the technically-literate reader with blatant errors or bogus assertions about how things work. Although I personally don't have time or patience for MUDs,view most of AI as snake-oil, and abhor postmodern architecture, I thought the time spent reading this book was an extremely good investment.

4,965 citations

01 Jan 2016

1,572 citations

01 Oct 2006
TL;DR: Art Practice as Research: Inquiry in the Visual Arts by Graeme Sullivan as discussed by the authors provides an in-depth perspective on the inherent value of visual arts practice as research and the robust possibilities that it offers when interconnected with wider research systems and methodologies that are constituted by the other disciplines.
Abstract: Art Practice as Research: Inquiry in the Visual Arts Graeme Sullivan (2005). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 265 pages. ISBN 1-4129-0536-2Reviewed by Charles GaroianThe Pennsylvania State UniversityFor over four decades, art education scholars have been advocating for the visual arts within the context of K-12 education by arguing their cognitive and affective significance as a discipline-specific area of inquiry and across school curricula. Beginning with the establishment of the professional field of art education in the mid-1960s to the development of Discipline-Based Art Education, to Visual Culture studies in art education, and most recently, the growing literature on Art-Based Research, the field has reinvented itself in order to clarify its positioning and to gain agency and credibility within the larger context of educational research and practice in the U.S. and internationally. Depending on the political climate surrounding schooling, these efforts at bringing the visual arts to the center of curricular and pedagogical concerns have, for the most part, fallen on deaf ears.While there is little disagreement about the importance of visual arts education among the populace, when push comes to shove within the political economy of schooling, art is the first area of content to be questioned, then reduced, if not eliminated, from the curriculum. As post-Sputnik education and now No Child Left Behind has shown us, the visual arts are the first to suffer when politics enters the picture of what constitutes basic education in the U.S. If the larger role that the visual arts can play in the education of children is going to be taken seriously, then it is arguments like those found in Graeme Sullivan's recent book, Art Practice as Research: Inquiry in the Visual Ans (2005), that can ensure a broader appreciation and understanding of how the visual arts constitute significant research and contribute in significant ways to children's creative and intellectual development.Given its research-on-art-as-research focus, Sullivan's book makes a significant contribution to the literature in the field of art education. His arguments place art-based research in the center of educational practice as they clearly establish the visual arts as a significant form of creative and intellectual inquiry. While creativity has long been touted as the major contribution of the visual arts to new knowledge, it has not been central to a pragmatic understanding of art's intellectual value in knowledge acquisition, as Sullivan clearly demonstrates.While in the past, research methodologies were borrowed from the hard sciences and social sciences to study and argue for the curricular and pedagogical relevance of art making in classrooms, Sullivan has mined existing methodologies and compared them with the ways in which the visual arts are constituted as research. What is unique about his approach is that he does not rely solely on external research methodologies to validate the importance of visual arts practice for creative and intellectual development.Instead, he provides an in-depth perspective on the inherent value of visual arts practice as research and the robust possibilities that it offers when interconnected with wider research systems and methodologies that are constituted by the other disciplines.In Art Practice as Research: Inquiry in the Visual Arts, Sullivan begins with "Part 1: Contexts for Visual Arts Research," in which he establishes the conceptual, historical, and educational foundations of visual arts research, arguing that if it is to have any impact at all, it must be grounded in visual arts strategies, challenge existing paradigms of institutionalized knowledge, and adapted to other systems of research, theory, and practice. In "Part 2: Theorizing Visual Arts Practice," he develops and establishes the visual knowing of the artist-as-theorist, and the idea that complex systems of inquiry in art practice are robust and boundary-breaking in their methodologies, and proposes that their cognitive and transformative processes enable new insights, criticalities, and understandings to occur. …

473 citations

01 Jan 2008

309 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 2019
TL;DR: ChangeExplorer as mentioned in this paper is a smart watch application to support citizen feedback, to investigate the extent to which digital wearables can address barriers to participation in planning and contribute to both technology-mediated citizen involvement and urban planning participation methods.
Abstract: There has been a recent shift in England towards empowering citizens to shape their neighbourhoods. However, current methods of participation are unsuitable or unwieldy for many people. In this paper, we report on ChangeExplorer, a smart watch application to support citizen feedback, to investigate the extent to which digital wearables can address barriers to participation in planning. The research contributes to both technology-mediated citizen involvement and urban planning participation methods. The app leverages in-situ, quick interactions encouraging citizens to reflect and comment on their environment. Taking a case study approach, the paper discusses the design and deployment of the app in a local planning authority through interviews with 19 citizens and three professional planners. The paper discusses the potential of the ChangeExplorer app to address more conceptual issues, and concludes by assessing the degree to which the technology raises awareness of urban change and whether it could serve a...

84 citations