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Jock Young

Bio: Jock Young is an academic researcher from City University of New York. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cultural criminology & Moral panic. The author has an hindex of 28, co-authored 71 publications receiving 5413 citations. Previous affiliations of Jock Young include Middlesex University & John Jay College of Criminal Justice.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: From Inclusive to Exclusive Society Crime and Discord in an Age of Late Modernity Cannibalism and Bulimia Essentialising the Other Demonisation and the Creation of Monstrosity The Criminology of Intolerance Zero Tolerance Policing and The American Prison Experiment as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: From Inclusive to Exclusive Society Crime and Discord in an Age of Late Modernity Cannibalism and Bulimia Essentialising the Other Demonisation and the Creation of Monstrosity The Criminology of Intolerance Zero Tolerance Policing and The American Prison Experiment A World Holding Together and Falling Apart Holding Chaos in Abeyance The Maintenance of Order amongst Lightly Engaged Strangers The Contradictory World of Late Modernity

679 citations

Book
01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: Crossing the borderline The Disembededness of everyday life The Genesis of Othering The Attractions of Hiatus The Vertigo of Late Modernity Turbo-Charged Capitalism Blurring the Binary Vision Bulimia: Not Exclusion But Inclusion/Exclusion Crossing the Borderline: Against the Dual City Thesis The Functional Underclass The Boundaries of Bulimias The Precariousness of Inclusion The Crime and the Narrowing of Differences The Focus Upon the Underclass Globalisation and the Generation of Domestic and Global Discontent The Sociology of V
Abstract: Crossing the Borderline The Disembededness of Everyday Life The Genesis of Othering The Attractions of Hiatus The Vertigo of Late Modernity Turbo-Charged Capitalism Blurring the Binary Vision Bulimia: Not Exclusion But Inclusion/Exclusion Crossing the Borderline: Against the Dual City Thesis The Functional Underclass The Boundaries of Bulimia The Precariousness of Inclusion The Crime and the Narrowing of Differences The Focus Upon the Underclass Globalisation and the Generation of Domestic and Global Discontent The Sociology of Vindictiveness and the Criminology of Transgression Fear of Falling The Change in the Focus of Reward Towards a Criminology of Transgression Humiliation and Rebellion The Satisfactions of Transgression The Humiliation of Exclusion Edgework, Ontological Security and Utopia From Turf War to Real War Hip Hop Across the Borders Chaos and the Coordinates of Order Chaos and Identity in the Twenty First Century The Undermining of the Meritocracy Changes in the Perceived Class Structure The Shift to Identity Politics Antecedents of the Cultural Shift The War Against the Poor The Meta-Humiliation of Poverty The Decline of Work and The Invisible Servant The Declining Centrality of Work? Getting the Poor to Work: The US Experiment Redemption Through Labour Including the Excluded Welfare: From Relief to Irresponsibility Early Morning in Harlem The Invisible Worker The Invisible Servant Entering the Zone of Humiliation Service as a Feudal Relationship The Invisible Poor in a Classless Society Guilt and Middle Class Solipsism Social Inclusion and Redemption through Labour New Labour: New Inclusionism The Welfare State: Not the Solution but the Problem The Will to Win Many's a Slip Twixt Cup and Lip: New Labour's Obsessional Neurosis The Moral Panic Over Teenage Pregnancy Rationality and the Middle Classes From Structure to Agency: Beyond the Weak Thesis Social and Political Exclusion Crossing the Border: To These Wet and Windy Shores The Social Construction of the Immigrant To These Wet and Windy Shores Two Modes of Entry Over Twenty Years Ago: The Riots of 1981 Crime and the Demonisation of the Other The Roots of Othering The Final Phase: The Irony of Assimilation The Roots of the Disturbances The Riots in Bradford, Burnley and Oldham Postscript: The Riots in France 2005 Terrorism and Anti-Terrorism Terrorism: The Banality of Evil Proxy Wars and the Defeat of the Soviet Union Occidentalism The House of Bush and the House of Saudi The Two Contradictions: Inside and Outside the First World Symmetry and Differences The Beatification of Evil The Logic of the West The Photographs from Abu Grahib Love Was All They Had to Set Against Them The London Bombing and the Banality of Evil The Dialectics of Othering and the Problem of Evil The Generation of Anger and the Frustration of Normality The Othering of the Otherer The Summoning Up of Violence Violence and the Metaphor of War Elsewhere: On the D Train to Manhattan Urban Somnambulism: Elsewhere in a Brooklyn Deli The Exclusive Community The Organic Community Othering in the Ardoyne: The Holy Cross School The Fallacy of Privileging Community Enter Virtual Reality: Elsewhere in the East End Stars, Celebrities: Guiding Narratives for a Shifting World The Cronus Effect and Broken Narratives The Deterritorialisation of Community and the Rise of the Virtual Elsewhere in an Elevator: John Jay College, October 2004 The Rise of Multi-Media and the Uninvited Guest From Generalised Other to Generalised Elsewhere From Community to Public Sphere The Community in Late Modern Times Conclusion: Roads to Elsewhere Affirmative and Transformative Inclusion The Politics of Redistribution Towards a New Politics of Inclusion The Politics of Deconstruction Othering and Community The Banishment of Unreason Rationality, the New Media and the Public Sphere The Porous Community Hyperpluralism and the Elusive Other Towards a Politics of Diversity

475 citations

Book
01 Jan 1973
TL;DR: A major contribution to criminology in which Taylor, Walton and Young provide a framework for a fully social theory of crime was made by as discussed by the authors, who considered the problem of crime as a social problem.
Abstract: A major contribution to criminology in which Taylor, Walton and Young provide a framework for a fully social theory of crime.

410 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: Cultural Criminology as mentioned in this paper is the winner of the ASC Distinguished Book Award for International Research 2017 and is a tour de force that is at once cool and classic, with illustrations and examples that combine theory and practice across a range of disciplines.
Abstract: This title is the winner of the ASC Distinguished Book Award for International Research! 'Beautifully written and superbly conceived, with illustrations and examples that combine theory and practice across a range of disciplines, "Cultural Criminology" should be read by anyone - academics and smart readers alike - interested in crime, media, culture and social theory. Bravo to Ferrell, Hayward and Young on a tour de force that is at once cool and classic! "Cultural Criminology" will influence the field for a very long time to come' - Professor Lynn Chancer, Hunter College, CUNY, USA. 'This is not just a book on the present state and possible prospects of our understanding of crime, criminals and our responses to both. However greatly criminologists might benefit from the authors' illuminating insights and the new cognitive vistas their investigations have opened, the impact of this book may well stretch far beyond the realm of criminology proper and mark a watershed in the progress of social study as such' - Zygmunt Bauman, Emeritus Professor, University of Leeds, UK. '"Cultural Criminology" offers a fresh new perspective on both criminality and criminal justice. It outlines the cultural hegemony of the powerful while also documenting the growing resistance to mindless criminalization and mass incarceration. Artfully written, the authors also document the work of those consciously creating a new political space to challenge the increasingly global, security society that seems inextricably tied up with late capitalism' - Meda Chesney-Lind, University of Hawaii at Manoa. 'Creative, challenging and controversial: a manifesto for mean times' - Tony Jefferson, Visiting Presidential Scholar, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, USA. Here is the definitive book on cultural criminology. Lively, innovative, engaging and accessible, "Cultural Criminology" draws together the work of three of the leading international figures in the field today. The book traces the history, current configuration, methodological innovations and future trajectories of cultural criminology, mapping its terrain for students and academics interested in this exciting field. The book highlights and analyzes issues of representation, meaning and politics in relation to crime and criminal justice, covering areas such as: crime and the media; everyday life and everyday transgression; popular culture; consumerism; globalisation; and, social control. The use of vignettes, case studies and visual material throughout the text brings the subject to life. "Cultural Criminology" is indispensable to students, lecturers and researchers in criminology, sociology, cultural studies and media studies. Jeff Ferrell is Professor of Criminal Justice at Texas Christian University and Visiting Professor at the University of Kent. Keith Hayward is Director of Studies for Criminology/Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Kent. Jock Young is Professor of Sociology at the University of Kent and Distinguished Professor at John Jay College, CUNY.

367 citations

Book
20 Jun 1993
TL;DR: The authors of this seminal work challenge many of the Left's traditional attitudes toward crime and policing, proposing instead a rigorous, new Left realism for the issues raised as mentioned in this paper, and propose a new left realism for crime.
Abstract: The authors of this seminal work challenge many of the Left's traditional attitudes toward crime and policing, proposing instead a rigorous, new Left realism for the issues raised.

342 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: The New York Review ofBooks as mentioned in this paper is now over twenty years old and it has attracted controversy since its inception, but it is the controversies that attract the interest of the reader and to which the history, especially an admittedly impressionistic survey, must give some attention.
Abstract: It comes as something ofa surprise to reflect that the New York Review ofBooks is now over twenty years old. Even people of my generation (that is, old enough to remember the revolutionary 196os but not young enough to have taken a very exciting part in them) think of the paper as eternally youthful. In fact, it has gone through years of relatively quiet life, yet, as always in a competitive journalistic market, it is the controversies that attract the interest of the reader and to which the history (especially an admittedly impressionistic survey that tries to include something of the intellectual context in which a journal has operated) must give some attention. Not all the attacks which the New York Review has attracted, both early in its career and more recently, are worth more than a brief summary. What do we now make, for example, of Richard Kostelanetz's forthright accusation that 'The New York Review was from its origins destined to publicize Random House's (and especially [Jason] Epstein's) books and writers'?1 Well, simply that, even if the statistics bear out the charge (and Kostelanetz provides some suggestive evidence to support it, at least with respect to some early issues), there is nothing surprising in a market economy about a publisher trying to push his books through the pages of a journal edited by his friends. True, the New York Review has not had room to review more than around fifteen books in each issue and there could be a bias in the selection of

2,430 citations

Book
23 Nov 1995
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on youth cultures that revolve around dance clubs and raves in Great Britain and the U.S. and highlight the values of authenticity and hipness and explore the complex hierarchies that emerge within the domain of popular culture.
Abstract: Focusing on youth cultures that revolve around dance clubs and raves in Great Britain and the U.S., Sarah Thornton highlights the values of authenticity and hipness and explores the complex hierarchies that emerge within the domain of popular culture. She portrays club cultures as "taste cultures" brought together by micro-media like flyers and listings, transformed into self-conscious "subcultures" by such niche media as the music and style press, and sometimes recast as "movements" with the aid of such mass media as tabloid newspaper front pages. She also traces changes in the recording medium from a marginal entertainment in the 50s to the clubs and raves of the 90s. Drawing on the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Thornton coins the term "subcultural capital" to make sense of distinctions made by "cool" youth, noting particularly their disparagement of the "mainstream" against which they measure their alternative cultural worth. Well supported with case studies, readable, and innovative, Club Cultures will become a key text in cultural and media studies and in the sociology of culture.

1,964 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Four principles of classification for effective rehabilitation are reviewed: risk, need, responsivity, and professional override.
Abstract: Four principles of classification for effective rehabilitation are reviewed: risk, need, responsivity, and professional override. Many examples of Case x Treatment interactions are presented to ill...

1,737 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A descriptive analysis of strategies of crime control in contemporary Britain and elsewhere can be found in this paper, where the authors argue that the normality of high crime rates and the limitations of criminal justice agencies have created a new predicament for governments.
Abstract: The article offers a descriptive analysis of strategies of crime control in contemporary Britain and elsewhere. It argues that the normality of high crime rates and the limitations of criminal justice agencies have created a new predicament for governments. The response to this predicament has been recurring ambivalence that helps explain the volatile and contradictory character of recent crime control policy. The article identifies adaptive strategies (responsibilization, defining deviance down, and redefining organizational success) and strategies of denial (the punitive sovereign response), as well as the different criminologies that accompany them.

1,575 citations