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Jody Berland

Bio: Jody Berland is an academic researcher from York University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Visual culture & Nationalism. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 28 publications receiving 366 citations. Previous affiliations of Jody Berland include Concordia University & Concordia University Wisconsin.

Papers
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Book
07 Oct 2009
TL;DR: The mapping of the North of Empire is described in this article, where the authors present a map of the Canadian Imagining Technologies and the Planetary Body in the context of technology and technology.
Abstract: Acknowledgments xi Introduction: Mapping North of Empire 1 1. Writing on the Border 29 2. Space at the Margins: Colonial Spatiality and Critical Theory after Innis 65 3. Spatial Narratives in the Canadian Imaginary 98 4. Angels Dancing: Cultural Technologies and the Production of Space 130 5. The Musicking Machine 165 6. Locating Listening 185 7. Weathering the North 210 8. Mapping Space: Imagining Technologies and the Planetary Body 242 9. Cultural Technologies and the "Evolution" of Technological Cultures 273 Postscript 300 Notes 309 Bibliography 341 Index 369

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jody Berland1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors compare the forgetting in and about invisible disabilities with the cultures of remembering and caring exemplified by the elephant who "never forgets" and address the pedagogical implications of this invisible disability.
Abstract: Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFE/ME) is an invisible disability that forces researchers to delineate new boundaries between illness and impairment, and between medical knowledge and patients’ experience. As a neurological impairment, this condition attacks memory and cognition, which paradoxically become the focus of patients’ own accounts of their experience and understanding. This paper addresses the pedagogical implications of this invisible disability. Drawing on emergent research on the social ties and social memory of elephants, this paper compares the forgetting in and about invisible disabilities with the cultures of remembering and caring exemplified by the elephant who ‘never forgets’. Just as the elephant exemplifies the interdependency of social relations and memory, so teachers and administrators can acknowledge different kinds of memory and expectations of memory and social process in pedagogical environments.

37 citations

Book ChapterDOI
25 Feb 2008

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jody Berland1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that the proliferation of animal imagery is significant not only in the affective management of digital practices and investments, but more broadly in the management of cultural and ecological risk.
Abstract: Background This article builds on McLuhan’s medium theory to address the undertheorized role of animals as mediators in network cultures. Analysis McLuhan’s medium theory aligns with and to some extent anticipates contemporary discussion about posthumanist thought that recognizes that human perception and experience are shaped by and extended through non-human tools and connections. Both digital culture and the endangered status of the natural world now call upon us to elaborate less anthropocentric concepts of mediation to understand our interdependence with the non-human world. Conclusion and implications Using as illustration various moments of media change, including early coins and the first cat videos, this article argues that the proliferation of animal imagery is significant not only in the affective management of digital practices and investments, but more broadly in the management of cultural and ecological risk. Contexte Cet article se fonde sur la theorie des medias de Marshall McLuhan afin de traiter du role sous-theorise des animaux en tant que mediateurs dans les cultures du reseau. Analyse La theorie des medias de McLuhan s’aligne avec—et dans une certaine mesure anticipe—les discussions contemporaines sur la pensee post-humaniste reconnaissant que des connections et outils non-humains contribuent a former et a prolonger la perception et l’experience humaines. La culture numerique et le statut menace du monde naturel exigent que nous elaborions des concepts sur la mediation qui soient moins anthropocentriques afin de mieux comprendre notre interdependance avec le monde non-humain. Conclusion et implications Cet article se rapporte a divers changements mediatiques, y compris la creation de certaines pieces de monnaie anciennes et les premieres videos sur les chats, pour soutenir que la proliferation d’imagerie animale est importante, non seulement dans la gestion affective de pratiques et d’investissements numeriques, mais aussi plus generalement dans la gestion de risques culturels et ecologiques.

25 citations


Cited by
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Book Chapter
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this article, Jacobi describes the production of space poetry in the form of a poetry collection, called Imagine, Space Poetry, Copenhagen, 1996, unpaginated and unedited.
Abstract: ‘The Production of Space’, in: Frans Jacobi, Imagine, Space Poetry, Copenhagen, 1996, unpaginated.

7,238 citations

01 Jan 1995

1,882 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this book, Johnson primarily addresses a research audience, and his model seems designed to stimulate thought rather than to improve clinical technique, which suggests that lithium should have no therapeutic value in patients, such as those with endogenous depression, who already "under-process" cognitive information.
Abstract: basic research and clinical data in an attempt to derive a cohesive model which explains the behavioral effects of the drug. Johnson is an experimental psychologist, and his work underlies many of the chapters which suggest that lithium decreases the behavioral response to novel external stimuli. He then utilizes this foundation to propose a cognitive model for lithium's anti-manic action, its inhibition of violent impulsivity, and its prophylactic effects in recurrent depression. Previous formulations which were clinically based, such as that of Mabel Blake Cohen and her associates, stressed the primacy of depression and noted the \"manic defense\" as an attempt to ward off intolerable depression. In direct contrast, Johnson views mania as the primary disturbance in bipolar disorder. He considers depression in bipolar disease as an over-zealous homeostatic inhibitory responsf to a maniaassociated cognitive overload. Consistent with this, he believes, lit lum exerts its anti-manic effect by decreasing cognitive processing in a manner analogous to his animal studies. Johnson also suggests that lithium exerts its prophylactic effect in recurrent depressions by treating subclinical mania. These concepts are supported by the work of Johnson's associate, Kukopulos, to whom the book is dedicated. The bulk of the research which describes the cognitive disturbance in mania is complex, however, and uncomfortably open to multiple interpretations. Recognized as a preliminary effort, Johnson's formulation may help to guide further research. Although Johnson clearly traces lithium actions through a broad range of subjects, his discussion of the neurophysiological aspects of this drug is notably spotty. In particular, Johnson ignores the work of Svensson, DeMontigny, Aghajanian, and others who suggest that serotonergic systems may play an important role in the antidepressant actions of lithium. As a result, he fails to discuss one of the most important current uses of lithium: as an agent used in conjunction with antidepressant medications to increase treatment response in medication-resistant forms of depression. Lithium augmentation of antidepressant medication also challenges the formulation presented by Johnson. This formulation suggests that lithium should have no therapeutic value in patients, such as those with endogenous depression, who already \"under-process\" cognitive information. The omission of lithium augmentation in depression is clearly unfortunate in this text. Overall, this volume demonstrates the benefits of a single-authored text. It it clearly organized and readable. The bibliography is also broad and useful. In this book, Johnson primarily addresses a research audience, and his model seems designed to stimulate thought rather than to improve clinical technique. In this capacity, his book will be of most interest to behavioral psychologists. Other books, focusing purely on clinical data, may be more useful to clinicians. Nevertheless, the clear organization, the large bibliography, and the thoughtful presentation may make this text a useful addition to a clinical library as well.

1,865 citations

01 Jan 1985
TL;DR: In this paper, Meyrowitz shows how changes in media have created new social situations that are no longer shaped by where we are or who is "with" us, making it impossible for us to behave with each other in traditional ways.
Abstract: How have changes in media affected our everyday experience, behavior, and sense of identity? Such questions have generated endless arguments and speculations, but no thinker has addressed the issue with such force and originality as Joshua Meyrowitz in No Sense of Place. Advancing a daring and sophisticated theory, Meyrowitz shows how television and other electronic media have created new social situations that are no longer shaped by where we are or who is "with" us. While other media experts have limited the debate to message content, Meyrowitz focuses on the ways in which changes in media rearrange "who knows what about whom" and "who knows what compared to whom," making it impossible for us to behave with each other in traditional ways. No Sense of Place explains how the electronic landscape has encouraged the development of: -More adultlike children and more childlike adults; -More career-oriented women and more family-oriented men; and -Leaders who try to act more like the "person next door" and real neighbors who want to have a greater say in local, national, and international affairs. The dramatic changes fostered by electronic media, notes Meyrowitz, are neither entirely good nor entirely bad. In some ways, we are returning to older, pre-literate forms of social behavior, becoming "hunters and gatherers of an information age." In other ways, we are rushing forward into a new social world. New media have helped to liberate many people from restrictive, place-defined roles, but the resulting heightened expectations have also led to new social tensions and frustrations. Once taken-for-granted behaviors are now subject to constant debate and negotiation. The book richly explicates the quadruple pun in its title: Changes in media transform how we sense information and how we make sense of our physical and social places in the world.

1,361 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The article reviews the book "Alone Together: Why the authors expect more from technology and less from each other," by Sherry Turkle.
Abstract: The article reviews the book "Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other," by Sherry Turkle.

1,242 citations