scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

John Darwin

Other affiliations: University of Reading
Bio: John Darwin is an academic researcher from University of Oxford. The author has contributed to research in topics: Empire & British Empire. The author has an hindex of 17, co-authored 30 publications receiving 1358 citations. Previous affiliations of John Darwin include University of Reading.

Papers
More filters
Book
John Darwin1
24 Sep 2009
TL;DR: The project of an empire in the long nineteenth century is described in this paper, with a focus on the British World-System in the Age of War, 1914-19, 1919-26, 1927-37, 1937-42 and 1943-51.
Abstract: Introduction: the project of an Empire Part I Towards 'The Sceptre of the World': The Elements of Empire in the Long Nineteenth Century: 1 Victorian origins 2 The octopus power 3 The commercial republic 4 The Britannic experiment 5 'Un-British rule' in 'Anglo-India' 6 The weakest link: Britain and South Africa 7 The Edwardian transition Part II 'The Great Liner is Sinking': The British World-System in the Age of War: 8 The War for Empire, 1914-19 9 Making imperial peace, 1919-26 10 Holding the centre, 1927-37 11 The strategic abyss, 1937-42 12 The price of survival, 1943-51 13 The third world power, 1951-9 14 Reluctant retreat, 1959-68 Conclusion

206 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the crisis of empire and nationalism in the 1950s are discussed. But their focus is on war and empire, 1939-45 and 1945-48, respectively.
Abstract: Preface.- Maps.- Decolonisation.- War and Empire, 1939-45.- The Crisis of Empire, 1945-48.- World Power or Imperial Decline?.- Nationalism and Empire in the 1950s.- Winds of Change.- Winding Up.- Conclusion.- Notes and References.- Select Bibliography.- Index.

175 citations

Book
30 Oct 2012
TL;DR: The British Empire shaped the world in countless ways: repopulating continents, carving out nations, imposing its own language, technology, and values as mentioned in this paper, and it remains surrounded by myth, misconception and controversy today.
Abstract: This is a both controversial and comprehensive historical analysis of how the British Empire worked, from Wolfson Prize-winning author and historian John Darwin. The British Empire shaped the world in countless ways: repopulating continents, carving out nations, imposing its own language, technology and values. For perhaps two centuries its expansion and final collapse were the single largest determinant of historical events, and it remains surrounded by myth, misconception and controversy today. John Darwin's provocative and richly enjoyable book shows how diverse, contradictory and in many ways chaotic the British Empire really was, controlled by interests that were often at loggerheads, and as much driven on by others' weaknesses as by its own strength.

118 citations

Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss domestic politics and Britain's imperial retreat economics and the end of Empire international politics and the beginning of Empire the onslaught of colonial nationalism, and the role of white nationalism.
Abstract: Domestic politics and Britain's imperial retreat economics and the end of Empire international politics and the end of Empire the onslaught of colonial nationalism.

80 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Elliott as mentioned in this paper compares the empires built by Spain and Britain in the Americas, from Columbus's arrival in the New World to the end of Spanish colonial rule in the early nineteenth century.
Abstract: This epic history compares the empires built by Spain and Britain in the Americas, from Columbus's arrival in the New World to the end of Spanish colonial rule in the early nineteenth century. J. H. Elliott, one of the most distinguished and versatile historians working today, offers us history on a grand scale, contrasting the worlds built by Britain and by Spain on the ruins of the civilizations they encountered and destroyed in North and South America. Elliott identifies and explains both the similarities and differences in the two empires' processes of colonization, the character of their colonial societies, their distinctive styles of imperial government, and the independence movements mounted against them. Based on wide reading in the history of the two great Atlantic civilizations, the book sets the Spanish and British colonial empires in the context of their own times and offers us insights into aspects of this dual history that still influence the Americas.

440 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the British and India in the eighteenth century and discuss the creation of difference, the ordering of difference and Coping with contradiction in the British Raj.
Abstract: 1. Introduction: Britian and India in the eighteenth century 2. Liberalism and empire 3. The creation of difference 4. The ordering of difference 5. Coping with contradiction 6. Epilogue: Raj, nation, empire.

428 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe surveillance and communication in early modern India, and the information order, the Rebellion of 1857-9 and pacification of India, c. 1785-1815.
Abstract: List of maps Preface Glossary List of abbreviations Introduction 1. Prologue: surveillance and communication in early modern India 2. Political intelligence and indigenous informants during the conquest of India, c. 1785-1815 3. Misinformation and failure on the fringes of empire 4. Between human intelligence and colonial knowledge 5. The Indian ecumene: an indigenous public sphere 6. Useful knowledge and godly society, c. 1830-50 7. Colonial controversies: astronomers and physicians 8. Colonial controversies: language and land 9. The information order, the Rebellion of 1857-9 and pacification 10. Epilogue: information, surveillance and the public arena after the Rebellion Conclusion: 'knowing the country' Bibliography Index.

401 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Utilitarians have usually been regarded as exponents of a moral theory, but in this work Dr Stokes lays emphasis on their claim to have developed a practical science of society as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The Utilitarians have usually been regarded as exponents of a moral theory, but in this work Dr Stokes lays emphasis on their claim to have developed a practical science of society. Political failure caused their practical character to languish in England, but in India the Utilitarian principles won far greater success. He analyzes James Mill's influence as the London head of the Indian administration on Macaulay's Benthamite reforms and on Fitzjames Stephen's significance in the passage of Utilitarianism into Imperialism.

359 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the imperialism of decolonization is discussed and discussed in the context of the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History: Vol. 22, No. 3, pp. 462-511.
Abstract: (1994). The imperialism of decolonization. The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History: Vol. 22, No. 3, pp. 462-511.

249 citations