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John Frederick Matthews

Bio: John Frederick Matthews is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Roman Empire & Classical antiquity. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 8 publications receiving 587 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Nov 1989

230 citations

Book
01 Jan 1975
TL;DR: The governing classes the ascendany of Ausonius the accession of Theodosius Christianity and the court - Constantinople the provincial upper classes - evangelism and heresy the usurpation of Maximus Christianity as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The governing classes the ascendany of Ausonius the accession of Theodosius Christianity and the court - Constantinople the provincial upper classes - evangelism and heresy the usurpation of Maximus Christianity and the court - Milan Theodosius and the West the regime of Stilicho Alaric, Rome, Ravenna Gaul and Spain (406-418) "Ordo Renascendi" - Gaul, Italy East and West Olympiodorus and Rome.

122 citations

Book
31 Dec 2000
TL;DR: Laying Down the Law as discussed by the authors is a Matthewsian book, sharing many of the virtues and much of the style of his Western Aristocracies and Imperial Court AD 364-425 (1975) and The Roman Empire of Ammianus (1989).
Abstract: At the outset of Laying Down the Law, John Matthews states that his book will attempt to provide ‘an understanding of the nature of the [Theodosian] Code and how it was produced’, and that it will be ‘about the Code itself and not about the Roman Empire portrayed in its pages’ (vii). The nervous reader might anticipate dry exegesis of legalistic minutiae, particularly when M. goes on to express the concern that this will be his ‘least “popular” book’ (xi). Neither M. nor the nervous reader should be concerned. Laying Down the Law is quintessentially a Matthewsian book, sharing many of the virtues and much of the style of his Western Aristocracies and Imperial Court AD 364-425 (1975) and The Roman Empire of Ammianus (1989)

115 citations

Book
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: A comprehensive, three-part historical and cultural atlas as mentioned in this paper documents the origins of Rome and Greek influence, the transition from Republican to Imperial Rome, and the rise and decline of the Roman Empire.
Abstract: This comprehensive, three-part historical and cultural atlas documents the origins of Rome and Greek influence, the transition from Republican to Imperial Rome, and the rise and decline of the Roman Empire.

62 citations

Book
19 Oct 2006
TL;DR: In the early fourth century, a lawyer and public figure from the Nile valley city of Hermopolis made a six-month business related journey to Antioch and the day-to-day details are preserved on papyrus documents and offer a remarkable record of this journey.
Abstract: In the early fourth century, a lawyer and public figure from the Nile valley city of Hermopolis made a six-month business related journey to Antioch. The day to day details are preserved on papyrus documents and offer a remarkable record of this journey, covering everything from distances traveled to daily food purchases, from medicinal supplies to fees paid for services. In this book, the classicist and historian John Matthews translates these important documents and places them in the wider context of the social history of the Graeco-Roman world. The memoranda relating to Theophanes' journey are presented within a historical narrative that offers an array of revelations on diet, travel, social relations, and other fascinating topics. This book creates an unprecedented account of daily life in the years preceding Emperor Constantine's rise to power in the eastern provinces of the Roman empire.

35 citations


Cited by
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BookDOI
30 Jan 2009

287 citations

Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The law of Late Antiquity as discussed by the authors, the construction of authority, the efficacy of law, the problem of pain, and the corrupt judge are discussed in detail in this paper.
Abstract: 1. The law of Late Antiquity 2. Making the law 3. The construction of authority 4. The efficacy of law 5. In court 6. Crime and the problem of pain 7. Punishment 8. The corrupt judge 9. Dispute settlement I: out of court 10. Dispute settlement II: episcopalis audientia Conclusion.

201 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Nov 2007
TL;DR: The Roman National Income was indeed larger than that of any pre-industrial European state as mentioned in this paper, and the standard of living of the masses exceeds bare subsistence levels in the Roman Empire.
Abstract: Roman society of the early empire presents a confusing and ambiguous image that we cannot easily situate in unidirectional accounts of European economic history. Clearly, public monuments in marble or other precious stone, military security, the urban food supply, roads, aqueducts and gladiatorial games testify to public consumption on a grand scale. On the other hand, the signs of poverty, misery, and destitution are no less obvious. Many inhabitants of the Roman empire only eked out a meager living, their skeletons grim testimonies to malnutrition and disease. Growth occurred because the wealth of the elite may have been a sign of effective exploitation of the poor. Roman National Income was indeed larger than that of any preindustrial European state. One of the requirements for an economy is to provide enough subsistence for its population to survive. The economic and social achievements of pre-industrial societies can be measured if standard of living of the masses exceeds bare subsistence levels.

182 citations

Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: Pocock as discussed by the authors explores the controversy caused by Gibbon's treatment of the early Christian church and challenges the assumption that Gibbon wrote with the intention of destroying belief in the Christian revelation, and questions our understanding of the character of 'enlightenment'.
Abstract: This fifth volume in John Pocock's acclaimed sequence on Barbarism and Religion turns to the controversy caused by Edward Gibbon's treatment of the early Christian church Examining this controversy in unprecedented depth, Pocock challenges the assumption that Gibbon wrote with the intention of destroying belief in the Christian revelation, and questions our understanding of the character of 'enlightenment' Reconsidering the genesis, inception and reception of these crucial chapters of Decline and Fall, Pocock explores the response of Gibbon's critics, affirming that his reputation as an unbeliever was established before his history of the Church had been written The magnitude of Barbarism and Religion is already apparent Religion: The First Triumph will be read not just as a remarkable analysis of the making of Decline and Fall, but also as a comment on the collision of belief and disbelief, a subject as pertinent now as it was to Gibbon's eighteenth-century readers

178 citations

DOI
01 Dec 1997
TL;DR: In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish as mentioned in this paper and Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan, who was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic.
Abstract: Greek artefacts, craftsmen and artists had penetrated Rome since regal days; from the second century BC this trickle had become a continuing and influential flood, contributing together with Italic and Etruscan architecture and art, and the developing central Italian and Roman concrete architecture, to the rich tapestry of the art of the capital. Vespasian (69-79), founder of the Flavian dynasty, showed an astute pragmatism in his handling of architecture and art. In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish. Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan. The age of Hadrian (117-38) proved to be extraordinary, largely because of the extent to which he was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic. The rich artistic harvest of the Flavian to the Antonine ages was not just an imperial, but a corporate achievement, one which offered a worthy inheritance to following generations.

172 citations