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Author

John Greenway

Bio: John Greenway is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Folklore & Legend. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 9 publications receiving 594 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI

516 citations

Book
29 Jan 1953

45 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1970
TL;DR: This volume is complemented by original recordings of stories and songs from the Limba country (Sierra Leone), collected by Finnegan during her fieldwork in the late 1960s as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: This revised edition makes Finnegan’s ground-breaking research available to the next generation of scholars. It includes a new introduction, additional images and an updated bibliography, as well as its original chapters on poetry, prose, "drum language” and drama, and an overview of the social, linguistic and historical background of oral literature in Africa. This volume is complemented by original recordings of stories and songs from the Limba country (Sierra Leone), collected by Finnegan during her fieldwork in the late 1960s,

891 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1985-Poetics
TL;DR: The cultural field consists of a set of systems of interrelated agents and institutions functionally defined by their role in the division of labour (of production, reproduction and diffusion of cultural goods) as mentioned in this paper.

378 citations

Book
01 Jan 1971

296 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results show that using EpiFix in addition to standard care is efficacious for wound healing, with superior healing rates over standard treatment alone.
Abstract: Our purpose was to compare healing characteristics of diabetic foot ulcers treated with dehydrated human amniotic membrane allografts (EpiFix®, MiMedx, Kennesaw, GA) versus standard of care. An IRB-approved, prospective, randomised, single-centre clinical trial was performed. Included were patients with a diabetic foot ulcer of at least 4-week duration without infection having adequate arterial perfusion. Patients were randomised to receive standard care alone or standard care with the addition of EpiFix. Wound size reduction and rates of complete healing after 4 and 6 weeks were evaluated. In the standard care group (n = 12) and the EpiFix group (n = 13) wounds reduced in size by a mean of 32·0% ± 47·3% versus 97·1% ± 7·0% (P < 0·001) after 4 weeks, whereas at 6 weeks wounds were reduced by −1·8% ± 70·3% versus 98·4% ± 5·8% (P < 0·001), standard care versus EpiFix, respectively. After 4 and 6 weeks of treatment the overall healing rate with application of EpiFix was shown to be 77% and 92%, respectively, whereas standard care healed 0% and 8% of the wounds (P < 0·001), respectively. Patients treated with EpiFix achieved superior healing rates over standard treatment alone. These results show that using EpiFix in addition to standard care is efficacious for wound healing.

214 citations