scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

John Gross

Bio: John Gross is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Legend. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 63 citations.
Topics: Legend

Papers
More filters
Book
01 Jan 1992

56 citations

Book
01 Apr 1993

7 citations


Cited by
More filters
Book
21 Jul 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the centrality of economic rationales to debates on Jews' status in Italy, Britain, France and Germany during the course of two centuries is discussed, and the common themes that informed these debates are the ideal republic and the "ancient constitution", the conflict between virtue and commerce, and notions of useful and productive labor.
Abstract: This study demonstrates the centrality of economic rationales to debates on Jews' status in Italy, Britain, France and Germany during the course of two centuries. It delineates the common themes that informed these debates - the ideal republic and the 'ancient constitution', the conflict between virtue and commerce, and the notion of useful and productive labor. It thus provides an overview of the political-economic dimensions of Jewish emancipation literature of this period. This overview is viewed against the backdrop of broader controversies within European society over the effects of commerce on inherited political values and institutions. By focusing on economic attitudes toward Jews, the book also illuminates European intellectual approaches toward economic modernity. By elucidating these general debates, it renders more contemporary Jewish economic self-conceptions - and the enormous impetus that Jewish reformist movements placed on the Jews' economic and occupational transformation - fully explicable.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using the Merchant of Venice in teaching monetary economics as discussed by the authors has been shown to be a useful tool for teaching economics in the real world, and has been used extensively in the past decade.
Abstract: (1998). Using The Merchant of Venice in Teaching Monetary Economics. The Journal of Economic Education: Vol. 29, No. 4, pp. 330-339.

38 citations

01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this article, Awtrey et al. studied the sources of religious freedom in early Pennsylvania and found that Jews played active, not passive, roles in redrawing the boundaries around freedom and reshaping religious freedom to include religious groups beyond Protestant Christians alone.
Abstract: Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Department History Document Type Dissertation Abstract Historians’ traditional narrative regarding religious freedom in the colonial period and early republic focuses on Protestants and sometimes Catholics to the exclusion of other religious groups; the literature also emphasizes the legal dimensions of freedom at the expense of its cultural manifestations. This study, conversely, demonstrates that Jews, the only white non-Christian minority group in early Pennsylvania, experienced freedom far differently than its legality can adequately explain. Jews, moreover, reshaped religious freedom to include religious groups beyond Protestant Christians alone. But such grassroots transformations were neither quick nor easy. Like most of the AngloAmerican world, William Penn’s “Holy Experiment” excluded Jewish émigrés and other non-Protestants from citizenship and full participation in civil society. Jews, though, played active, not passive, roles in redrawing the boundaries around freedom. Jews participated in the secular marketplace, enlightenment culture, and newspaper politics, which normalized Jews and Judaism in public life and forged important relationships between Jews and economic and political patrons of cultural and political authority. Although Jews contended with prejudices, their activities in the public square and relationships with patrons granted them enough influence among enlightened elites to demand wider parameters for their public religious expressions and political participation. After about 1800, Jews enjoyed full religious freedom, cultural integration, and citizenship, but waves of nineteenth-century Jewish migrations revived dormant antiJewish and anti-Semitic sentiments. Despite pervasive prejudice that sometimes negated their statuses in civil society, Jews utilized cultural institutions to refashion their reputations, honor, and respectability in the eyes of their Protestant neighbors. As activists, not victims, Jews sat in the vanguard of the cultural transformations that made a meaningful religious pluralism in antebellum culture a reality. Date 4-3-2018 Recommended Citation Awtrey, Jonathon Derek, "Jews and the Sources of Religious Freedom in Early Pennsylvania" (2018). LSU Doctoral Dissertations. 4544. https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/4544

35 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The case for Bardolatry was made in this paper, where Bloom rescues Shakespeare from the critics, and the play's the thing is written by O'Dair.
Abstract: PART I: BARDOLATRY/ BARDOGRAPHY 'Harold Bloom's Shakespeare' J.L. Halio 'Bloom With A View' T. Hawkes 'The Case for Bardolatry: Harold Bloom Rescues Shakespeare from the Critics' W.W. Kerrigan 'Bloom, Bardolatry, and Characterolatry' R. Levin 'The Singularity of Shakespeare (and Middleton)' G. Taylor PART II: READING AND WRITING SHAKESPEAREAN CHARACTER 'Inventing Us' H. Kenner 'On the Value of Being a Cartoon, in Literature and in Life' S. O'Dair 'The Play's The Thing': Shakespeare's Critique of Character (and Harold Bloom)' W. R. Morse 'This Dotage of Our General's': Reading Bloom Reading Shakespeare' M. Fahmi 'Peace, I Will Stop Your Mouth': Insights and Absences in Harold Bloom's Understanding of Shakespeare's Lovers' H. Weil PART III: THE ANXIETIES OF INFLUENCE 'Romanticism and its Discontents' E. Pechter 'Looking for Mr. Goodbard: Swinburne, Sodomy, and the Invention of Bloom' R. Sawyer 'Bloom on Race and Ethnicity: Shakespeare and the Invention of the European' J. R. Andreas, Sr. 'Shakespeare in a Different Place: Bloom and Contemporary Women's Writing' C. Cakebread PART IV: SHAKESPEARE AS CULTURAL CAPITAL Harold Bloom as Shakespearean Pedagogue' C. Desmet 'King Lear in their Time: On Bloom and Cavell on Shakespeare' L.F. Rhu 'This Shakespeare Will Not Do': Harold Bloom and the Literary Canon' D. M. Schiller 'The 2% Solution' L. Charnes

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the plays of Marlowe and then of Shakespeare, the Jew becomes a figure which enables the playwright to express and at the same time to condemn the impulse in both culture and theatre to treat selfhood and social role as a matter of choice.
Abstract: The Jew available to be known in England in the 1590s is a Marrano - a covert figure whose identity is self-created, hard to discover, foreign, associated with novel or controversial enterprises like foreign trade or money-lending, and anxiety-producing. By and large, non-theatrical representations of Jewishness reveal less ambivalence than does Marlowe's Barabas. In the plays of Marlowe and then of Shakespeare, the Jew becomes a figure which enables the playwright to express and at the same time to condemn the impulse in both culture and theatre to treat selfhood and social role as a matter of choice. By becoming theatrical, the anxiety about identity and innovation implicit in the Marrano state gains explicitness and becomes available to the culture at large. Marlowe and Shakespeare play a central role in creating - not imitating - the frightening yet comic Jewish figure which haunts Western culture. But the immediate impact of their achievement is felt in the theatre, and is barely visible in non-theat...

32 citations