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Author

John K. Roth

Other affiliations: DePauw University
Bio: John K. Roth is an academic researcher from Claremont McKenna College. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & Genocide. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 44 publications receiving 436 citations. Previous affiliations of John K. Roth include DePauw University.

Papers
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Book
30 Mar 2020
TL;DR: Different Voices as discussed by the authors is a collection of women's experiences of the Holocaust, focusing on the double jeopardy of Jewish women in the Holocaust; it gathers together the latest insights of scholars, powerful testimonies of survivors, and eloquent reflections of writers, theologians, and philosophers.
Abstract: Until now there has never been a systematic assessment of the "double jeopardy" of Jewish women in the Holocaust, because most of the chroniclers of this cruelest tragedy of modern history have been men. Yet for women, as scholar Myrna Goldenberg observes, "The hell was the same, but the horrors were different." Different Voices is the most thoroughgoing examination of women's experiences of the Holocaust ever compiled. It gathers together - for the first time in a single volume - the latest insights of scholars, the powerful testimonies of survivors, and the eloquent reflections of writers, theologians, and philosophers. Twenty-eight women in all speak of Hitler's "Final Solution, " from the rising storm in prewar Germany to the terrors and privations of the camps, and of the everyday heroism that kept hope alive. Part One, "Voices of Experience, " recounts the painful and poignant stories of survivors. We hear Olga Lengyel's anguish at discovering that she had unwittingly sent her mother and son to the gas chamber; on recalling the brutality of Irma Griese, a stunningly beautiful SS officer; on witnessing the unspeakable "medical experiments" the Nazis conducted on women. We share Livia F. Britton's memory of hunger and terrible vulnerability as a naked thirteen-year-old at Auschwitz. We learn of the horrific price that Dr. Gisela Perl was forced to pay to save women's lives. Part Two, "Voices of Interpretation, " offers the new insights of women scholars of the Holocaust, including evidence that the Nazis specifically preyed on women as the propagators of the Jewish race. Marion A. Kaplan describes the lives of a generation of Jewish women who thought that they were assimilated intoGerman society. Gisela Bok examines the Nazi's eugenics theories and sterilization programs, and Gitta Sereny questions Theresa Stangl, wife of the Kommandant of Sobibor and Treblinka, about her perceptions of the atrocities and of her moral responsibility. In Part Three, "Voices of

72 citations

Book
21 Jan 2011

36 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper found evidence that the recruitment mechanism is associated with the occurrence of wartime rape, in which armed groups that recruit by force (through abduction or pressganging) use rape to create unit cohesion and state weakness and insurgent contraband funding are also associated with increased wartime rape by rebel groups.
Abstract: Why do some armed groups commit massive wartime rape, whereas others never do? Using an original dataset, I describe the substantial variation in rape by armed actors during recent civil wars and test a series of competing causal explanations. I find evidence that the recruitment mechanism is associated with the occurrence of wartime rape. Specifically, the findings support an argument about wartime rape as a method of socialization, in which armed groups that recruit by force—through abduction or pressganging—use rape to create unit cohesion. State weakness and insurgent contraband funding are also associated with increased wartime rape by rebel groups. I examine observable implications of the argument in a brief case study of the Sierra Leone civil war. The results challenge common explanations for wartime rape, with important implications for scholars and policy makers.

323 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: The authors explored two powerful influences on the political pursuits of religious actors: the degree of autonomy between religious actors and states in their basic authority, and political theology, the set of ideas that religious actors hold about political authority and justice.
Abstract: This essay takes on the broad question - what explains the political pursuits of religious actors? - by exploring two powerful influences on these pursuits. The first is differentiation, or the degree of autonomy between religious actors and states in their basic authority. The second is political theology, the set of ideas that religious actors hold about political authority and justice. Through global comparisons across religions, regions, and states, it seeks to establish the effect of both influences on two political pursuits in which religion’s role is hotly debated today: support for democratization and political violence, including communal violence and terrorism. It concludes with lessons learned commonly from the analysis of both pursuits.

289 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Turkey, after over seven decades of rule by a secular nationalist military regime, an Islamic party won elections in 2002, deepening democracy and advocating Turkey's entry into the European Union as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In 1979, an Islamic revolution in Iran confounded American foreign policy and inspired an Islamic resurgence in Afghanistan, Kashmir, the Middle East, and elsewhere. In Turkey, after over seven decades of rule by a secular nationalist military regime, an Islamic party won elections in 2002, deepening democracy and advocating Turkey’s entry into the European Union. In the 1990s, after four decades of rule, India’s secular Congress Party yielded power to a Hindu nationalist party that promoted religious laws and discourse and provoked Hindu-Muslim violence. The teachings of the Catholic Church’s Second Vatican Council of 1962 to 1965 encouraged subsequent democratization in the Philippines, Brazil, and Poland, but not in Rwanda, Argentina, or Hungary. In Sri Lanka, a lack of separation between sangha and state has fueled war between Buddhists and Hindu Tamils, whereas Buddhism in Taiwan and South Korea has promoted human rights and religious tolerance. Over the past generation, evangelical Protestants have become a powerful voting bloc in the United States, Brazil, Guatemala, and Kenya. Defying the erstwhile dominance of the secularization thesis among western intellectuals, religion has waxed in its political influence over the past generation in every region of the globe except perhaps Western Europe (see Berger 1999; Casanova 1994; Stark 1999).

263 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: Gender studies in the field of Holocaust studies as discussed by the authors have emerged as a response to existing research and available sources within the wider field of women’s studies, and indeed women's studies.
Abstract: ‘The road to annihilation was marked by events that specifically affected men as men and women as women.’1 Yet, the subject of gender is a relative newcorner in the wider field of Holocaust studies.2 It is only in the last twenty years that this area has been explored. Before this time, the subject was barely touched for a number of reasons. First, the field of Holocaust studies itself was quite limited in its scope and development from the immediate post-war years until the 1960s and 1970s.3 Only as certain other issues and areas were researched did questions about women and the family come onto the agenda for research. Second, questions pertaining to gender simply were not asked. It took until the era of ‘second-wave feminism’ in the 1970s, with new developments and trends in historical awareness about the history of women and rendering them ‘visible’, for these issues to be raised. As a result of feminist scholarship, the concept of gender as an analytical tool developed. Third, the state of the available sources was not conducive to advancing research in this area. It took until the 1970s for a proliferation of survivors’ memoirs to appear, as well as collected testimonies, which became an important source for researchers in this field. Gender studies of the Holocaust, therefore, appeared only once the field had developed to a certain point. They emerged as a response to existing research and available sources within the wider field of Holocaust studies, and indeed women’s studies.

175 citations