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John M. Collins

Bio: John M. Collins is an academic researcher from Eastern Washington University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Comparative law & Legal culture. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 4 publications receiving 17 citations.

Papers
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Book
19 May 2016
TL;DR: In this article, Collins presents the first comprehensive history of martial law in the early modern period and argues that rather than being a state of exception from law, martial law was understood and practiced as one of the King's laws.
Abstract: John M. Collins presents the first comprehensive history of martial law in the early modern period. He argues that rather than being a state of exception from law, martial law was understood and practiced as one of the King's laws. Further, it was a vital component of both England's domestic and imperial legal order. It was used to quell rebellions during the Reformation, to subdue Ireland, to regulate English plantations like Jamestown, to punish spies and traitors in the English Civil War, and to build forts on Jamaica. Through outlining the history of martial law, Collins reinterprets English legal culture as dynamic, politicized, and creative, where jurists were inspired by past practices to generate new law rather than being restrained by it. This work asks that legal history once again be re-integrated into the cultural and political histories of early modern England and its empire.

19 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 May 2016
Book ChapterDOI
01 May 2016
Book ChapterDOI
01 May 2016

Cited by
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Book
22 Apr 2011
TL;DR: In this paper, a state in the disguise of a merchant is described as a "State in the Disguise of a Merchant" and a "Politie of Civill and Military Power": Diplomacy, War and Expansion.
Abstract: Introduction: "A State in the Disguise of a Merchant" Part I: Foundations Chapter 1 "Planning & Peopling Your Colony": Building a Company-State Chapter 2 "A Sort of Republic for the Management of Trade": The Jurisdiction of a Company-State Chapter 3 "A Politie of Civill and Military Power": Diplomacy, War, and Expansion Chapter 4 "Politicall Science and Martiall Prudence": Political Thought and Political Economy Chapter 5 "The Most Sure and Profitable Sort of Merchandice": Protestantism and Piety Part II: Transformations Chapter 6 "Great Warrs Leave Behind them Long Tales": Crisis and Response in Asia after 1688 Chapter 7 Auspicio Regis et Senatus Angliae": Crisis and Response in Britain after 1688 Chapter 8 "The Day of Small Things": Civic Governance in the New Century Chapter 9 "A Sword in One Hand & Money in the Other": Old Patterns, New Rivals Conclusion "A Great and Famous Superstructure" Abbreviations Glossary Notes Index

197 citations

Book
07 Feb 2019
TL;DR: Murphy as mentioned in this paper investigated the consequences of Henry VIII's invasion of France by examining the devastating impact of warfare on the native population, the methods the English used to impose their rule on the region (from the use of cartography to the construction of fortifications) and the development of English of colonial rule in France.
Abstract: In 1544, Henry VIII led the largest army then ever raised by an English monarch to invade France. This book investigates the consequences of this action by examining the devastating impact of warfare on the native population, the methods the English used to impose their rule on the region (from the use of cartography to the construction of fortifications) and the development of English of colonial rule in France. As Murphy explores the significance of this major financial and military commitment by the Tudor monarchy, he situates the developments within the wider context of English actions in Ireland and Scotland during the mid-sixteenth century. Rather than consider the plantations established in the mid-sixteenth century Ireland as the 'laboratory' for a new form of empire, this book argues that they should be viewed along with the Boulogne venture as the English crown's final attempt to establish colonies through the use of state resources alone.

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used the case of Josiah Philips, who led a banditti residing in the Great Dismal Swamp, to show how law intersected with class and race in patriot thinking.
Abstract: The politics of war severely divided the Virginia Southside during the American Revolution. Laborers, ship pilots and other landless men and women bitterly resented the efforts of the patriot gentry to stop trade with Great Britain and to establish a military force. Planters feared that the presence of the British Navy would encourage slaves to flee or attack their masters. What role did law play in the patriot response to these conditions? This essay uses the case of Josiah Philips, who led a banditti residing in the Great Dismal Swamp, to show how law intersected with class and race in patriot thinking. The gentry's view of the landless as dependent and lacking in self-control and its view of black slaves as posing a constant threat of violence supported the application of special legal regimes suited to these dangers. In particular, Philips was “attainted” by the General Assembly, a summary legislative legal proceeding traditionally employed against offenders who threatened government itself. While the attainder was uncontroversial when it passed, the significance of the Assembly's intervention changed over time. By the late 1780s, some among the state's legal elite regarded the Assembly as having unnecessarily interfered in the ordinary course of justice, which they were then seeking to reform. This opened the way to recharacterize the Assembly's extraordinary legal jurisdiction as an arbitrary exercise of lawmaking power.

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: As intelligence coordinator for the Cromwellian Protectorate, John Thurloe was responsible for securing the new regime against a number of different threats, including Royalist plots and potential...
Abstract: As intelligence co-ordinator for the Cromwellian Protectorate, John Thurloe was responsible for securing the new regime against a number of different threats, including Royalist plots and potential...

14 citations