scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

John Measey

Bio: John Measey is an academic researcher from Stellenbosch University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Population & Biology. The author has an hindex of 19, co-authored 77 publications receiving 965 citations.
Topics: Population, Biology, Ecology, Medicine, Biodiversity

Papers published on a yearly basis

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that invasion syndromes can account for the context-dependency of biological invasions while incorporating insights from comparative studies and will help to structure thinking, identify transferrable risk assessment and management lessons, and highlight similarities among events that were previously considered disparate invasion phenomena.
Abstract: Our ability to predict invasions has been hindered by the seemingly idiosyncratic context-dependency of individual invasions. However, we argue that robust and useful generalisations in invasion science can be made by considering “invasion syndromes” which we define as “a combination of pathways, alien species traits, and characteristics of the recipient ecosystem which collectively result in predictable dynamics and impacts, and that can be managed effectively using specific policy and management actions”. We describe this approach and outline examples that highlight its utility, including: cacti with clonal fragmentation in arid ecosystems; small aquatic organisms introduced through ballast water in harbours; large ranid frogs with frequent secondary transfers; piscivorous freshwater fishes in connected aquatic ecosystems; plant invasions in high-elevation areas; tall-statured grasses; and tree-feeding insects in forests with suitable hosts. We propose a systematic method for identifying and delimiting invasion syndromes. We argue that invasion syndromes can account for the context-dependency of biological invasions while incorporating insights from comparative studies. Adopting this approach will help to structure thinking, identify transferrable risk assessment and management lessons, and highlight similarities among events that were previously considered disparate invasion phenomena.

79 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that for sustainable development, biological invasions should be explicitly considered within One Health and direct collaborations between invasion scientists, disease ecologists and epidemiologists on modelling, risk assessment, monitoring and management would be mutually beneficial.
Abstract: The study and management of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and of biological invasions both address the ecology of human-associated biological phenomena in a rapidly changing world. However, the two fields work mostly in parallel rather than in concert. This review explores how the general phenomenon of an organism rapidly increasing in range or abundance is caused, highlights the similarities and differences between research on EIDs and invasions, and discusses shared management insights and approaches. EIDs can arise by: (i) crossing geographical barriers due to human-mediated dispersal, (ii) crossing compatibility barriers due to evolution, and (iii) lifting of environmental barriers due to environmental change. All these processes can be implicated in biological invasions, but only the first defines them. Research on EIDs is embedded within the One Health concept-the notion that human, animal and ecosystem health are interrelated and that holistic approaches encompassing all three components are needed to respond to threats to human well-being. We argue that for sustainable development, biological invasions should be explicitly considered within One Health. Management goals for the fields are the same, and direct collaborations between invasion scientists, disease ecologists and epidemiologists on modelling, risk assessment, monitoring and management would be mutually beneficial.

73 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: In terms of research, South Africa has played an important role in the development of invasion science globally, with strengths in theoretical and applied invasion science, and world-leading expertise in specific sub-disciplines.
Abstract: South Africa has much to offer as a location for the study of biological invasions. It is an ecologically diverse country comprised of nine distinct terrestrial biomes, four recognised marine ecoregions, and two sub-Antarctic Islands. The country has a rich and chequered socio-political history, and a similarly varied history of species introductions. There has been a long tradition of large-scale conservation in the country, and efforts to manage and regulate invasions began in the nineteenth century, with some notable successes, but many setbacks. With the advent of democracy in the early 1990s, South Africa established large alien species control programmes to meet the dual demands of poverty alleviation and conservation, and has since pioneered regulatory approaches to address invasions. In terms of research, South Africa has played an important role in the development of invasion science globally. It continues to have one of the most active communities anywhere in the world, with strengths in theoretical and applied invasion science, and world-leading expertise in specific sub-disciplines (e.g. the classical biological control of invasive plants).

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
31 Mar 2017-Bothalia
TL;DR: It is suggested that southern Africa is becoming more vulnerable to amphibian invasions because of an increase in trade, agricultural and domestic impoundments as well as global climate change.
Abstract: Background : Globally, invasive amphibians are known for their environmental and social impacts that range from poisoning of local fauna and human populations to direct predation on other amphibians. Although several countries on most continents have had multiple introductions of many species, southern Africa appears to have escaped allochthonous introductions. Instead, it has a small number of domestic exotic species that have rapidly expanded their ranges and established invasive populations within South Africa. Objectives & methods : We used the literature to provide a historical overview of dispersal by some of the world’s major invasive amphibians, give examples of species that are commonly moved as stowaways and discuss historical and current amphibian trade in the region. In addition, we give an overview of new South African legislation and how this is applied to amphibian invasions, as well as providing updates on the introduced populations of three domestic exotics: Hyperolius marmoratus, Sclerophrys gutturalis and Xenopus laevis . Results : We show that frogs are mainly moved around southern Africa through ‘jump’ dispersal, although there are a number of records of ‘cultivation’, ‘leading-edge’ and ‘extreme long-distance’ dispersal types. Important pathways include trade in fruit and vegetables, horticultural products and shipping containers. Conclusion : We suggest that southern Africa is becoming more vulnerable to amphibian invasions because of an increase in trade, agricultural and domestic impoundments as well as global climate change. Increasing propagule pressure suggests that preventing new introductions will become a key challenge for the future. Currently, trade in amphibians in the region is practically non-existent, suggesting potential for best practice to prevent importation of species with high invasion potential and to stop the spread of disease.

63 citations

31 Mar 2018
TL;DR: Lee Anne Botha, Oupa Chauke, Jennifer Fill, and Lee Anne Chauke as mentioned in this paper contributed to the work of Lee Anne Bothaa and OUPA Chauke.
Abstract: Additional contributing authors: Lee-Anne Botha, Oupa Chauke, Jennifer Fill, 8 Therese Forsyth Llewellyn Foxcroft, Charles Griffiths, Michelle Greve, Dai 9 Herbert, Pat Holmes, Philip Ivey, Stiaan Kotze, David Le Maitre, Rob Little, 10 Karabo Malakalaka, John Measey, Siyasanga Miza, Bernard Ndou, 11 Khathutshelo Nelukalo , David Richardson, Tammy Robinson, Ian Rushworth , 12 Ross Shackleton, Heather Terrapon Andrew Turner, Ruan Veldtman, Giovanni 13 Vimercati, Costas Zachariades 14

59 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Preface to the Princeton Landmarks in Biology Edition vii Preface xi Symbols used xiii 1.
Abstract: Preface to the Princeton Landmarks in Biology Edition vii Preface xi Symbols Used xiii 1. The Importance of Islands 3 2. Area and Number of Speicies 8 3. Further Explanations of the Area-Diversity Pattern 19 4. The Strategy of Colonization 68 5. Invasibility and the Variable Niche 94 6. Stepping Stones and Biotic Exchange 123 7. Evolutionary Changes Following Colonization 145 8. Prospect 181 Glossary 185 References 193 Index 201

14,171 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Biomechanics and motor control of human movement is downloaded so that people can enjoy a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon instead of juggling with some malicious virus inside their laptop.
Abstract: Thank you very much for downloading biomechanics and motor control of human movement. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have search hundreds times for their favorite books like this biomechanics and motor control of human movement, but end up in infectious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they juggled with some malicious virus inside their laptop.

1,689 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Elton's "The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants" as mentioned in this paper is one of the most cited books on invasion biology, and it provides an accessible, engaging introduction to the most important environmental crises of our time.
Abstract: Much as Rachel Carson's \"Silent Spring\" was a call to action against the pesticides that were devastating bird populations, Charles S. Elton's classic \"The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants\" sounded an early warning about an environmental catastrophe that has become all too familiar today-the invasion of nonnative species. From kudzu to zebra mussels to Asian long-horned beetles, nonnative species are colonizing new habitats around the world at an alarming rate thanks to accidental and intentional human intervention. One of the leading causes of extinctions of native animals and plants, invasive species also wreak severe economic havoc, causing $79 billion worth of damage in the United States alone. Elton explains the devastating effects that invasive species can have on local ecosystems in clear, concise language and with numerous examples. The first book on invasion biology, and still the most cited, Elton's masterpiece provides an accessible, engaging introduction to one of the most important environmental crises of our time. Charles S. Elton was one of the founders of ecology, who also established and led Oxford University's Bureau of Animal Population. His work has influenced generations of ecologists and zoologists, and his publications remain central to the literature in modern biology. \"History has caught up with Charles Elton's foresight, and \"The Ecology of Invasions\" can now be seen as one of the central scientific books of our century.\"-David Quammen, from the Foreword to \"Killer Algae: The True Tale of a Biological Invasion\

1,321 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The conductivity bridge derives its bridge source from a self-contained vacuum tube oscillator adjusted to approximately 1,000 cycles as mentioned in this paper, which operates directly from the A.C. power source.
Abstract: The new Conductivity Bridge derives its bridge source. voltage from a self-contained vacuum tube oscilltor adjusted to approximately 1,000 cycles. Voltage for the amplifier and null indicator tubes is provided by a.builtin D.C. power supply which operates directly from the A.C. power source. 9-324 Conductivity Bridge, without Conductivity Cell, for use with 110 volts 5060 cycle A.C. 9-351.Cosi~uCvity Cell, for use with Conductivity Bridge, constant 0.8, $20.00

1,028 citations