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John S. Conway

Bio: John S. Conway is an academic researcher from University of British Columbia. The author has contributed to research in topics: Protestantism & Nazism. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 23 publications receiving 180 citations.
Topics: Protestantism, Nazism, German, Persecution, Politics

Papers
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Book
01 Feb 1997

66 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The impact of the Holocaust has been interpreted by historians largely according to the present needs of their audiences as mentioned in this paper, with the focus on Jewish sufferings, as well as on Nazi rule.
Abstract: The impact of the Holocaust has been interpreted by historians largely according to the present needs of their audiences. Jewish historians, both in Israel and outside, see these events as the culminating tragedy of their people before the rebirth in statehood. German historians are more con cerned with the attempt to overcome their knowledge of guilt and therefore concentrate, not so much on Jewish sufferings, as on Nazi rule. Christian historians and theo logians have sought to eradicate the long tradition of Christian prejudice against Jews, which some of them see as cul minating in the Holocaust. Historians of nazism are divided into rival schools and have yet to reach any firm conclusions on such topics as the genesis of the Final Solution. Was the persecution of the Jews something unique or just the prelude to other genocidal measures against unwanted groups of society? The impact of ideology in governmental policies and the weakness of the traditional barriers to the corruptions of absolute power a...

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The mission of Myron C. Taylor, personal representative of Presidents Roosevelt and Truman to Pope Pius XII, remains a strange anomaly in the history of the foreign relations of the United States as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The mission of Myron C. Taylor, personal representative of Presidents Roosevelt and Truman to Pope Pius XII, remains a strange anomaly in the history of the foreign relations of the United States. Ever since 1867, when an act of Congress terminated diplomatic relations between the republic and the world's oldest diplomatic entity, the United States had been unrepresented at the Vatican City. The short-lived attempt to reconstitute some form of permanent and effective diplomatic presence was born in controversy and lasted only from 1940 to 1950 during the incumbency of the single appointee. When on Taylor's resignation President Truman attempted to appoint a popular second world war general to the post, the outcry in the United States was so heated that the nomination had to be withdrawn and the venture abandoned. What went wrong? Was the storm of protest merely a result of religious bigotry on the part of American Protestantism? Or had Taylor's conduct of his mission been such as to evoke these outraged feelings? Certain episodes of the diplomatic negotiations between the United States and the Vatican have already been published, for example, the polite exchange of courtesies collected and introduced by Taylor himself, Wartime Correspondence between President Roosevelt and Pope Pius XII. Some more controversial matters, such as the question of the advisability of bombing Rome, were outlined from the American point of view in the Foreign Relations of the United States. Not until the Vatican's recent decision to publish some of its papers from the pontificate of Pius XII, or more particularly until the opening of Taylor's own papers in 1973, has it been possible to study in more detail the curious entanglement of theological, diplomatic and political considerations which governed the United States' relations with the Vatican, and encompassed Taylor's mission from beginning to end.

8 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the puzzling behavior of tyrants who undermine themselves once in power and use a variety of psychological frameworks to try to resolve this puzzle in the cases of several ancient and three contemporary tyrants.
Abstract: This article explores the puzzling behavior of tyrants who undermine themselves once in power. Therealpolitik perspective and a variety of psychological frameworks are used to try to resolve this puzzle in the cases of several ancient and three contemporary tyrants. Although all the frameworks used have explanatory power, the one that most closely fits the tyrants studied here is that of the narcissist with severe superego deficiencies. An individual with such psychological characteristics may have some advantages in rising to power, and his behavior may be an effective response to some real-life factors, but once he has consolidated his position his reality-testing capacities diminish. Fantasies held in check when his power is limited are apt to become his guides to action. As a consequence, his behavior becomes more erratic, he runs into difficulties in meeting his goals, and his paranoid defenses become more exaggerated. The finale of a tyrant’s career depends on the particulars of his political and social situation.

150 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose a theoretical framework for realpolitik and loss in the context of human vulnerability and the need for unity and altruistic punishment, and discuss the possibility of revolt and punishment.
Abstract: Preface Part I. Introduction: 1. Preliminary considerations 2. Case selection Part II. Explaining Perpetrators: Theoretical Foundations: 3. Continuity and validation 4. Prologue to theory 5. A theoretical framework Part III. The Theory Applied: 6. Threat of numbers, realpolitik, and ethnic cleansing 7. Realpolitik and loss 8. The need for unity and altruistic punishment 9. Perpetrating states Part IV. Victim Vulnerability: Explaining Magnitude and Manner of Dying: 10. Raison d'etat, raison d'eglise 11. Cynical realpolitik and the unwanted 12. High victimization: the role of realpolitik 13. Inequality and absence of identification 14. On the possibility of revolt and altruistic punishment Part V. Exceptions: 15. A dog of different nature: the Cambodian Politicide 16. Dogs that didn't bark I: realpolitik and the absence of loss 17. Dogs that didn't bark II: affinity and vulnerability reduction Part VI. Conclusion: 18. Findings, consequences, and prevention.

138 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors showed that voters most hurt by the depression, and most likely to oppose the government, fall into separate groups with divergent interests, which explains why some turned to the Nazis and others turned away.
Abstract: The enormous Nazi voting literature rarely builds on modern statistical or economic research. By adding these approaches, we find that the most widely accepted existing theories of this era cannot distinguish the Weimar elections from almost any others in any country. Via a retrospective voting account, we show that voters most hurt by the depression, and most likely to oppose the government, fall into separate groups with divergent interests. This explains why some turned to the Nazis and others turned away. The consequences of Hitler’s election were extraordinary, but the voting behavior that led to it was not.

120 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: The anti-cultural turn of Western Political Thought that has emerged out of Enlightenment thinking and was first turned into a comprehensive political idea by Thomas Hobbes is discussed in this paper. But it is the emotional part of the human psyche that enables us to create family like bonds based on culture.
Abstract: OF DISSERTATION FROM HOBBES TO HABERMAS: THE ANTI-CULTURAL TURN IN WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT The theme of this dissertation is the anti-cultural turn of Western Political Thought that has emerged out of Enlightenment thinking and was first turned into a comprehensive political idea by Thomas Hobbes. The Hobbesian worldview makes the case that human sociability and ultimately culture are the main drivers of conflict, and that the prescriptions of any political philosophy should aim to replace sociability with individuality. Beginning with an overview of psychological research into the phenomenon of culture I put forward the argument that human beings are by nature social and individualistic, but that they oscillate between their ability to put group-interests before individual interests and vice versa. Culture is the main mechanism that influences which interest we give priority. This mechanism work through emotional attachments that create intuitions about what is morally right and wrong, thereby influencing final behavioral outcomes. The Enlightenment and Thomas Hobbes viewed these emotional attachments as an insufficient or dangerous fundament for social action, leading to a philosophical approach that put rational individualism at the center of its moral matrix, diminishing the importance of the emotional attachments created by culture. These attachments are crucial for the emergence of communities and the ability to engage in collective action. Contrary to the idea of a community formation driven purely by rationality, I propose that it is the emotional part of the human psyche that enables us to create family like bonds based onb culture. In my dissertation I investigate the consequences of this reductionist view on culture, and what it can mean for societies and institutions.

101 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an overview of the history of the Holocaust in Eastern Europe, focusing on the decision-making process of the Third Reich and its role in the Holocaust.
Abstract: Notes on Contributors Introduction D.Stone German or Nazi Antisemitism? O.Heilbronner Hitler and the Third Reich J.Noakes Ghettoization T.Cole War, Occupation and the Holocaust in Poland D.Pohl Expropriation and Expulsion F.Bajohr Local Collaboration in the Holocaust in Eastern Europe M.Dean Big Business and the Third Reich: An Appraisal of the Historical Arguments C.Kobrak & A.H.Schneider The Decision-Making Process C.R.Browning Historiography and the Perpetrators of the Holocaust J.Matthaus The Topography of Genocide A.Charlesworth Britain, the United States and the Holocaust: In Search of a Historiography T.Kushner The Holocaust and the Soviet Union J.Klier The German Churches and the Holocaust R.P.Ericksen & S.Heschel Jewish Leadership in Extremis D.Michman Jewish Resistance R.Rozett Gender and the Family L.Pine Romanies and the Holocaust: A Re-evaluation and an Overview I.Hancock From Streicher to Sawoniuk: The Holocaust in the Courtroom D.Bloxham The Holocaust Under Communism T.C.Fox Antisemitism and Holocaust Denial in Post-Communist Eastern Europe F.Lobont Post-Holocaust Philosophy J.Cohen Testimony and Representation Z.Waxman Memory, Memorials and Museums D.Stone The Holocaust and Genocide A.D.Moses Index

100 citations