scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

John Sellars

Bio: John Sellars is an academic researcher from King's College London. The author has contributed to research in topics: Stoicism & Western philosophy. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 33 publications receiving 348 citations. Previous affiliations of John Sellars include Birkbeck, University of London & Royal Holloway, University of London.

Papers
More filters
BookDOI
23 Feb 2016
TL;DR: Sellars as discussed by the authors discusses the role of Stoicism in the Renaissance and the Reformation of the Italian Renaissance and discusses the influence of the Stoic Themes in Modern English Literature.
Abstract: Introduction John Sellars Part 1: Antiquity and the Middle Ages 1. Stoicism in Rome Gretchen Reydams-Schils 2. Stoicism in Early Christianity Troels Engberg-Pedersen 3. Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism Lloyd Gerson 4. Augustine's Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions Sarah Byers 5. Boethius and Stoicism Matthew Walz 6. Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury Kevin Guilfoy 7. Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages Mary Beth Ingham Part 2: Renaissance and Reformation 8. The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance Ada Palmer 9. Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance Jill Kraye 10. Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought Barbara Pitkin 11. Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism Jacqueline Lagree 12. Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature Andrew Shifflett Part 3: Early Modern Europe 13. Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy Guido Giglioni 14. Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought Michael Moriarty 15. Spinoza and Stoicism Jon Miller 16. Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence David Forman 17. The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment Edward Andrew 18. Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment Christian Maurer 19. Kant and Stoic Ethics Jose Torralba and Daniel Doyle Part 4: The Modern World 20. Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy Michael Ure 21. Stoicism and Romantic Literature Simon Swift 22. Stoicism in Victorian Culture Heather Ellis 23. Stoicism in America Kenneth Sacks 24. Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics Christopher Gill 25. Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy Thomas Benatouil 26. The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy Donald Robertson. Index

123 citations

Book
01 Dec 2003
TL;DR: Sellars argues that the conception of philosophy as an "art of living", inaugurated by Socrates and developed by the Stoics, has persisted since antiquity and remains a living alternative to modern attempts to assimilate philosophy to the natural sciences as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: It is a commonplace to say that in antiquity philosophy was conceived as a way of life or an art of living, but precisely what such claims amount to has remained unclear. If ancient philosophers did think that philosophy should transform an individual's way of life, then what conception of philosophy stands behind this claim? John Sellars explores this question via a detailed account of ancient Stoic ideas about the nature and function of philosophy. He considers the Socratic background to Stoic thinking about philosophy and Sceptical objections raised by Sextus Empiricus, and offers readings of late Stoic texts by Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. Sellars argues that the conception of philosophy as an 'art of living', inaugurated by Socrates and developed by the Stoics, has persisted since antiquity and remains a living alternative to modern attempts to assimilate philosophy to the natural sciences. It also enables us to rethink the relationship between an individual's philosophy and their biography. The book appears here in paperback for the first time with a new preface by the author.

90 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argued that despite Cudworth's claim to be drawing on Stoic doctrine, in fact, despite his claim to use these terms with a meaning first articulated only later, by the Peripatetic commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias.
Abstract: In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ‘up to us’ and that these things are the product of our choice. These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his claim to be drawing on Stoic doctrine, Cudworth uses these terms with a meaning first articulated only later, by the Peripatetic commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias.

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Pomponazzi's arguments against Averroes in his De Immortalitate Animae, focusing on the question whether thought is possible without a body, have been examined in this paper.
Abstract: This paper examines Pomponazzi's arguments against Averroes in his De Immortalitate Animae, focusing on the question whether thought is possible without a body. The first part of the paper will sketch the history of the problem, namely the interpretation of Aristotle's remarks about the intellect in De Anima 3.4-5, touching on Alexander, Themistius, and Averroes. The second part will focus on Pomponazzi's response to Averroes, including his use of arguments by Aquinas. It will conclude by suggesting that Pomponazzi's discussion stands as the first properly modern account of Aristotle's psychology.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Simon the Shoemaker is not one immediately familiar name to specialists in ancient philosophy as discussed by the authors, which may well be due to the tendency of many scholars both past and present to deny his historical reality altogether.
Abstract: he name Simon the Shoemaker is not one immediately familiar to specialists in ancient philosophy. 1 This may well be due, in part, to the tendency of many scholars both past and present to deny his historical reality altogether. 2 Ancient sources refer to a Simon who, it is said, was an associate of Socrates and who ran a shoe shop on the edge of the Athenian Agora where Socrates used to come to engage in philosophical discussions with Simon while he worked. 3 However, the fact that neither Plato nor Xenophon mentions Simon has often been cited as an argument against his very existence. 4 Moreover, it is reported that the Socratic philosopher Phaedo wrote a dialogue entitled Simon, 5 and thus it has been suggested that the later “Simon legend” derived ultimately from a literary character created by Phaedo. 6

12 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI

539 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: Lloyd as discussed by the authors has edited a comprehensive collection of learned critical discussions of Spinoza's philosophy, covering the intellectual context in which he worked and the influence of his thought, as well as the published works.
Abstract: Genevieve Lloyd has edited a comprehensive collection of learned critical discussions of Spinoza's philosophy, covering the intellectual context in which he worked and the influence of his thought, as well as the published works.

508 citations

01 Jan 1911
TL;DR: The first volume appeared in 1878, just before Nietzsche abandoned his academic life, and was republished in 1886, incorporating in a second volume two books of aphorisms which Nietzsche had published in the meantime as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: This is the first new translation of both volumes of Nietzsche's Human, All-Too Human to appear since the beginning of the century. The first volume appeared in 1878, just before Nietzsche abandoned his academic life. In 1886 it was republished, incorporating in a second volume two books of aphorisms which Nietzsche had published in the meantime. Subtitled 'A Book for Free Spirits', Human, All Too Human marked for Nietzsche a new 'positivism' and scepticism with which he challenged his previous metaphysical and psychological assumptions. Nearly all the themes of his later work are displayed here with characteristic perceptiveness and honest), - it remains one of the works fundamental for an understanding of his thought.

483 citations