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Author

John Vince

Bio: John Vince is an academic researcher from Bournemouth University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Computer graphics & Virtual reality. The author has an hindex of 21, co-authored 64 publications receiving 1604 citations.


Papers
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Book
01 Apr 1995
TL;DR: This book discusses virtual reality and virtual environments, 3D computer graphics, geometric modelling, and the historical development of VR.
Abstract: *Virtual reality and virtual environments *The historical development of VR *3D computer graphics *Geometric modelling *Geometric transformations *A generic VR system *Animating the virtual environment *Physical simulation *Human factors *Virtual reality hardware *Virtual reality software *Virtual reality applications *The future

290 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The author explains the aims and Objectives of this book and explains how to use it, as well as some VR concepts and terms, and some of the benefits of using this book.
Abstract: 1 Virtual Reality.- 1.1 Introduction.- 1.2 What Is VR?.- 1.3 Who Should Read This Book?.- 1.4 The Aims and Objectives of This Book.- 1.5 Assumptions Made in This Book.- 1.6 How to Use This Book.- 1.7 Some VR Concepts and Terms.- 1.8 Navigation and Interaction.- 1.9 Immersion and Presence.- 1.10 What Is Not VR?.- 1.11 The Internet.- 1.12 Summary.- 2 The Benefits of VR.- 2.1 Introduction.- 2.2 3D Visualization.- 2.3 Navigation.- 2.4 Interaction.- 2.5 Physical Simulation.- 2.6 VEs.- 2.7 Applications.- 2.8 Summary.- 3 3D Computer Graphics.- 3.1 Introduction.- 3.2 From Computer Graphics to VR.- 3.3 Modelling Objects.- 3.4 Dynamic Objects.- 3.5 Constraints.- 3.6 Collision Detection.- 3.7 Perspective Views.- 3.8 3D Clipping.- 3.9 Stereoscopic Vision.- 3.10 Rendering the Image.- 3.11 Rendering Algorithms.- 3.12 Texture Mapping.- 3.13 Bump Mapping.- 3.14 Environment Mapping.- 3.15 Shadows.- 3.16 Radiosity.- 3.17 Other Computer Graphics Techniques.- 3.18 Summary.- 4 Human Factors.- 4.1 Introduction.- 4.2 Vision.- 4.3 Vision and Display Technology.- 4.4 Hearing.- 4.5 Tactile.- 4.6 Equilibrium.- 4.7 Summary.- 5 VR Hardware.- 5.1 Introduction.- 5.2 Computers.- 5.3 Tracking.- 5.4 Input Devices.- 5.5 Output Devices.- 5.6 Glasses.- 5.7 Displays.- 5.8 Audio.- 5.9 Summary.- 6 VR Software.- 6.1 Introduction.- 6.2 VR Software Features.- 6.3 Web-Based VR.- 6.4 Division's dVISE.- 6.5 Blueberry3D.- 6.6 Boston Dynamics.- 6.7 MultiGen.- 6.8 Summary.- 7 VR Applications.- 7.1 Introduction.- 7.2 Industrial.- 7.3 Training Simulators.- 7.4 Entertainment.- 7.5 VR Centres.- 7.6 Summary.- 8 Conclusion.- 8.1 The Past.- 8.2 Today.- 8.3 Conclusion.- Appendices.- Appendix A VRML Web Sites.- Appendix B HMDs.- Appendix C Trackers.- Appendix D VRML Program.- Appendix E Web Sites for VR Products.- Referebces.

173 citations

Book
11 Jun 2011
TL;DR: Quaternions for Computer Graphics introduces the reader to quaternion algebra by describing concepts of sets, groups, fields and rings, which are essential to understanding quaternions.
Abstract: Sir William Rowan Hamilton was a genius, and will be remembered for his significant contributions to physics and mathematics. The Hamiltonian, which is used in quantum physics to describe the total energy of a system, would have been a major achievement for anyone, but Hamilton also invented quaternions, which paved the way for modern vector analysis. Quaternions are one of the most documented inventions in the history of mathematics, and this book is about their invention, and how they are used to rotate vectors about an arbitrary axis. Apart from introducing the reader to the features of quaternions and their associated algebra, the book provides valuable historical facts that bring the subject alive. Quaternions for Computer Graphics introduces the reader to quaternion algebra by describing concepts of sets, groups, fields and rings. It also includes chapters on imaginary quantities, complex numbers and the complex plane, which are essential to understanding quaternions. The book contains many illustrations and worked examples, which make it essential reading for students, academics, researchers and professional practitioners.

97 citations

BookDOI
17 Apr 2012
TL;DR: Expanding the Frontiers of Visual Analytics and Visualization provides a review of the state of the art in computer graphics, visualization, and visual analytics by researchers and developers who are closely involved in pioneering the latest advances in the field.
Abstract: The field of computer graphics combines display hardware, software, and interactive techniques in order to display and interact with data generated by applications. Visualization is concerned with exploring data and information graphically in such a way as to gain information from the data and determine significance. Visual analytics is the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces. Expanding the Frontiers of Visual Analytics and Visualization provides a review of the state of the art in computer graphics, visualization, and visual analytics by researchers and developers who are closely involved in pioneering the latest advances in the field. It is a unique presentation of multi-disciplinary aspects in visualization and visual analytics, architecture and displays, augmented reality, the use of color, user interfaces and cognitive aspects, and technology transfer. It provides readers with insights into the latest developments in areas such as new displays and new display processors, new collaboration technologies, the role of visual, multimedia, and multimodal user interfaces, visual analysis at extreme scale, and adaptive visualization.

91 citations

Book
21 Apr 2008
TL;DR: John Vince tackles complex numbers and quaternions; the nature of wedge product and geometric product; reflections and rotations; and how to implement lines, planes, volumes and intersections in this accessible and very readable introduction to geometric algebra.
Abstract: Geometric algebra (a Clifford Algebra) has been applied to different branches of physics for a long time but is now being adopted by the computer graphics community and is providing exciting new ways of solving 3D geometric problems. John Vince (author of numerous books including Geometry for Computer Graphics and Vector Analysis for Computer Graphics) has tackled this complex subject in his usual inimitable style, and provided an accessible and very readable introduction. As well as putting geometric algebra into its historical context, John tackles complex numbers and quaternions; the nature of wedge product and geometric product; reflections and rotations (showing how geometric algebra can offer a powerful way of describing orientations of objects and virtual cameras); and how to implement lines, planes, volumes and intersections. Introductory chapters also look at algebraic axioms, vector algebra and geometric conventions and the book closes with a chapter on how the algebra is applied to computer graphics.

89 citations


Cited by
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Book
22 Dec 2012
TL;DR: To the Human Visual System (HVS), Visual Attention, Neurological Substrate of the HVS, and Neuroscience and Psychology, and Industrial Engineering and Human Factors.
Abstract: to the Human Visual System (HVS).- Visual Attention.- Neurological Substrate of the HVS.- Visual Psychophysics.- Taxonomy and Models of Eye Movements.- Eye Tracking Systems.- Eye Tracking Techniques.- Head-Mounted System Hardware Installation.- Head-Mounted System Software Development.- Head-Mounted System Calibration.- Table-Mounted System Hardware Installation.- Table-Mounted System Software Development.- Table-Mounted System Calibration.- Eye Movement Analysis.- Eye Tracking Methodology.- Experimental Design.- Suggested Empirical Guidelines.- Case Studies.- Eye Tracking Applications.- Diversity and Types of Eye Tracking Applications.- Neuroscience and Psychology.- Industrial Engineering and Human Factors.- Marketing/Advertising.- Computer Science.- Conclusion.

2,399 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An identity-based view is described to understand how the use of IT-based features in online communities is associated with online knowledge contribution, and it yields important implications for the design of the supporting IT infrastructure.
Abstract: A variety of information technology (IT) artifacts, such as those supporting reputation management and digital archives of past interactions, are commonly deployed to support online communities. Despite their ubiquity, theoretical and empirical research investigating the impact of such IT-based features on online community communication and interaction is limited. Drawing on the social psychology literature, we describe an identity-based view to understand how the use of IT-based features in online communities is associated with online knowledge contribution. Specifically, the use of four categories of IT artifacts---those supporting virtual co-presence, persistent labeling, self-presentation, and deep profiling---is proposed to enhance perceived identity verification, which thereafter promotes satisfaction and knowledge contribution. To test the theoretical model, we surveyed more than 650 members of two online communities. In addition to the positive effects of community IT artifacts on perceived identity verification, we also find that perceived identity verification is strongly linked to member satisfaction and knowledge contribution. This paper offers a new perspective on the mechanisms through which IT features facilitate computer-mediated knowledge sharing, and it yields important implications for the design of the supporting IT infrastructure.

1,131 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This analysis reveals a fragmented and poorly understood account of how graphical representations work, exposing a number of assumptions and fallacies, and proposes a new agenda for graphical representation research.
Abstract: Advances in graphical technology have now made it possible for us to interact with information in innovative ways, most notably by exploring multimedia environments and by manipulating three-dimensional virtual worlds. Many benefits have been claimed for this new kind of interactivity, a general assumption being that learning and cognitive processing are facilitated. We point out, however, that little is known about the cognitive value ofanygraphical representations, be they good old-fashioned (e.g. diagrams) or more advanced (e.g. animations, multimedia, virtual reality). In our paper, we critique the disparate literature on graphical representations, focusing on four representative studies. Our analysis reveals a fragmented and poorly understood account of how graphical representations work, exposing a number of assumptions and fallacies. As an alternative we propose a new agenda for graphical representation research. This builds on the nascent theoretical approach within cognitive science that analyses the role played by external representations in relation to internal mental ones. We outline some of the central properties of this relationship that are necessary for the processing of graphical representations. Finally, we consider how this analysis can inform the selection and design of both traditional and advanced forms of graphical technology.

1,072 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A number of the primary factors that contribute to the cause of cybersickness are discussed, three conflicting cybersickenness theories that have been postulated are described, and some possible methods for reducing cyberedickness in VEs are discussed.
Abstract: An important and troublesome problem with current virtual environment (VE) technology is the tendency for some users to exhibit symptoms that parallel symptoms of classical motion sickness both during and after the VE experience. This type of sickness, cybersickness, is distinct from motion sickness in that the user is often stationary but has a compelling sense of self motion through moving visual imagery. Unfortunately, there are many factors that can cause cybersickness and there is no foolproof method for eliminating the problem. In this paper, I discuss a number of the primary factors that contribute to the cause of cybersickness, describe three conflicting cybersickness theories that have been postulated, and discuss some possible methods for reducing cybersickness in VEs.

1,031 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Eye-tracking applications are surveyed in a breadth-first manner, reporting on work from the following domains: neuroscience, psychology, industrial engineering and human factors, marketing/advertising, and computer science.
Abstract: Eye-tracking applications are surveyed in a breadth-first manner, reporting on work from the following domains: neuroscience, psychology, industrial engineering and human factors, marketing/advertising, and computer science. Following a review of traditionally diagnostic uses, emphasis is placed on interactive applications, differentiating between selective and gaze-contingent approaches.

1,017 citations