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John William Draper

Bio: John William Draper is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: History of the United States & Solar simulator. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 18 publications receiving 291 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jun 1975
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the origins of science, its relation to modern science, and its relationship to modern civilisation, including the coming of science in the south of the world.
Abstract: 1. The origin of science 2. The origin of Christianity - its transformation on attaining Imperial power - its relations to Science 3. Conflict respecting the doctrine of the unity of God - the first of southern Reformation 4. The restoration of science in the south 5. Conflict respecting the nature of the soul - doctrine of emanation and absorption 6. Conflict respecting the nature of the world 7. Controversy respecting the age of the Earth 8. Conflict respecting the criterion of truth 9. Controversy respecting the government of the universe 10. Latin Christianity in relation to modern civilisation 11. Science in relation to modern civilisation 12. The impending crisis.

174 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1928

20 citations

Book
01 Jan 1876
TL;DR: The New York Professor paid this country a visit at the time of the meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, held at Oxford that year, and read a paper containing an abstract of the physiological arguments included in the present volumes respecting the mental progress of Europe.
Abstract: Sojie six or seven years ago we introduced Dr. Draper to the notice of our readers, as one not unfavourably known to the scientific world, by his labours in the sciences of chemistry and physics, particularly in those branches of them having special reference to biology. He has latterly taught physiology in the University of New York, and his treatise on ' Human Physiology, Statistical and Dynamical,' has been well received generally at the hands of the profession. When noticing this work, we specially referred to the last two chapters, as containing much interesting and instructive matter. It was pointed out that in the discussion " On the influence of physical agents on the aspect and form of man and on his intellectual qualities," the views of those who maintained the unity of the species, and the modifying influence of external agencies in giving rise to varieties of form and character, were unreservedly adopted. It was likewise shown that in the chapter entitled " Social Mechanics," a sketch of the history of modern civilization was given, as also of the various influences which have contributed to its development. These important topics were necessarily, however, touched upon in but a cursory manner. In 1860 the New York Professor paid this country a visit at the time of the meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, held at Oxford that year. He then read a paper containing an abstract of the physiological arguments included in the present volumes respecting the mental progress of Europe, reserving the historical evi-

18 citations


Cited by
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BookDOI
12 Oct 2017
TL;DR: The most celebrated naturalist of the nineteenth century, Charles Darwin this paper published a volume of letters written by and to Charles Darwin, which is part of the definitive edition of his correspondence.
Abstract: This volume is part of the definitive edition of letters written by and to Charles Darwin, the most celebrated naturalist of the nineteenth century Notes and appendixes put these fascinating and wide-ranging letters in context, making the letters accessible to both scholars and general readers Darwin depended on correspondence to collect data from all over the world, and to discuss his emerging ideas with scientific colleagues, many of whom he never met in person The letters are published chronologically: volume 27 includes letters from 1879, the year in which Darwin completed his manuscript on movement in plants He also researched and published a biography of his grandfather Erasmus The Darwins spent most of August on holiday in the Lake District In October, Darwin's youngest son, Horace, became officially engaged to Ida Farrer, after some initial resistance from her father, who, although an admirer of Charles Darwin, thought Horace a poor prospect for his daughter

482 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2006-Blood
TL;DR: How in vivo selection strategies can be used to make stem cell gene therapy applicable to the treatment of a wider scope of genetic diseases and patients is reviewed.

422 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the notions used by children aged 9-16 years to account for a number of easily observed astronomical events and identify general features in the development of the notions and historical parallels are noted.
Abstract: In this paper I describe the notions used by children aged 9‐16 years to account for a number of easily observed astronomical events. General features in the development of the notions are identified and historical parallels are noted. The data presented come from a wider study intended to develop materials and approaches for teaching astronomy as part of the science curriculum of all pupils. An indication is given as to how the findings of the survey are being used in developing appropriate curriculum materials.

339 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Here, it is re-asserted, with the Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory (GOLT), that gills, which must retain the properties of open surfaces because their growth, even while hyperallometric, cannot keep up with the demand of growing three-dimensional bodies.
Abstract: One of the main expected responses of marine fishes to ocean warming is decrease in body size, as supported by evidence from empirical data and theoretical modeling. The theoretical underpinning for fish shrinking is that the oxygen supply to large fish size cannot be met by their gills, whose surface area cannot keep up with the oxygen demand by their three-dimensional bodies. However, Lefevre et al. (Global Change Biology, 2017, 23, 3449–3459) argue against such theory. Here, we re-assert, with the Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory (GOLT), that gills, which must retain the properties of open surfaces because their growth, even while hyperallometric, cannot keep up with the demand of growing three-dimensional bodies. Also, we show that a wide range of biological features of fish and other water-breathing organisms can be understood when gill area limitation is used as an explanation. We also note that an alternative to GOLT, offering a more parsimonious explanation for these features of water-breathers has not been proposed. Available empirical evidence corroborates predictions of decrease in body sizes under ocean warming based on GOLT, with the magnitude of the predicted change increases when using more species-specific parameter values of metabolic scaling.

178 citations