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John Wylie

Other affiliations: University of Sheffield
Bio: John Wylie is an academic researcher from University of Exeter. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cultural geography & Cultural landscape. The author has an hindex of 16, co-authored 29 publications receiving 2104 citations. Previous affiliations of John Wylie include University of Sheffield.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe a single day's walking along the South West Coast Path in North Devon, England, focusing on the distinctive ways in which coast walking patterns into refracting orderings of subjectivity and spatiality, into sensations of anxiety and immensity, haptic enfolding and attenuation, encounters with others and with the elements.
Abstract: This paper tells the story of a single day's walking, alone, along the South West Coast Path in North Devon, England. Forms of narrative and descriptive writing are used here as creative and critical means of discussing the varied affinities and distanciations of self and landscape emergent within the affective and performative milieu of coastal walking. Discussion of these further enables critical engagement with current conceptualizations of self–landscape and subject–world relations within cultural geography and spatial-cultural theory more generally. Through attending to a sequence of incidents and experiences, the paper focuses upon the distinctive ways in which coast walking patterns into refracting orderings of subjectivity and spatiality – into for example, sensations of anxiety and immensity, haptic enfolding and attenuation, encounters with others and with the elements, and moments of visual exhilaration and epiphany.

615 citations

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TL;DR: In the context of human geography's encounter with the problematics that surround matter and materiality, the authors offers a principle that works towards a distinctive material imagination. This principle states that our image of matter should be multiplied, so that it can be attended to as taking place with the properties and capacities of any element or state.
Abstract: In the context of human geography's encounter with the problematics that surround matter and materiality, this paper offers a principle that works towards a distinctive material imagination. This principle states that our image of matter should be multiplied, so that it can be attended to as taking place with the properties and capacities of any element or state. We elaborate this principle through three substantive discussions of materiality as turbulent, as interrogative, and as excessive. In doing so we draw upon, in turn, forms of relational materialism associated with actor-network theory, the postphenomenologies of Lingis, the animate or enchanted materialism developed by Bennett, and the figurative and affective (im)materialities of Deleuze. The conclusion clarifies why we do not call for geography to be ‘rematerialised’.

338 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John Wylie1
TL;DR: In this paper, an account of landscape in terms of absence and the non-coincidence of self and world is developed, based on an encounter with a series of memorial benches at Mullion Cove, Cornwall.
Abstract: Working out from an encounter with a series of memorial benches at Mullion Cove, Cornwall, this paper develops an account of landscape in terms of absence and the non-coincidence of self and world. Arguing that recent work on the topics of landscape, embodiment, perception and material culture has tended to stress presence in various ways, I seek to explore instead here motifs of absence, distance, loss and haunting. The paper further attempts to combine descriptive and experiential accounts of the memorial benches and the views they open with conceptual arguments regarding the limits of certain phenomenological understandings of self and landscape. In particular, Derrida’s critical reading of Merleau-Ponty is outlined and explored. The final substantive section of the paper then takes a further cue from the memorial benches to discuss what it terms the geographies of love. The argument here is that such geographies constitute a fracture forbidding any phenomenological fusion of self and world, entailing instead a simultaneous opening-onto and distancing-from. It is within the tension of this openness and distance, perhaps, that landscape, absence and love are entangled.

282 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 2002-Geoforum
TL;DR: In this article, a personal account of ascending Glastonbury Tor, a prominent hill in Somerset, south-west England, is presented, where the authors argue that the production of an incarnate subjectivity within practices of ascension may be understood in the context of an ontology of visibility which both accounts for and problematises the distinction of seer and seen.

207 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an account of gazing as an eventful actualisation and distribution of self and landscape, through attending to the depths and folds of an immanent plane, from which distinctive and durable selves and landscapes arise and with which they are always in relation.
Abstract: The aim of this paper is to take some steps towards a renewed understanding of landscape and the gazing subject. A first main section, ‘Depth, outlines Merleau-Ponty's final visual philosophy and its attempts to replace a spectatorial conception of vision with an embodied ontology that accords transcendance to the depth of the visual world. A second section, ‘fold’, engages with Deleuze's rendition of Leibniz's philosophy as a means of both critiquing and supplementing Merleau-Ponty's account. Through these analyses I seek to rewrite the visual gaze upon landscape by exploring the ontological processes (processes of depth, processes of folding) which afford its actualisation. I thus seek to produce an account of gazing as an eventful actualisation and distribution of selves and landscape, through attending to the depths and folds of an immanent plane, from which distinctive and durable selves and landscapes arise and with which they are always in relation. Here, landscape is not a way of seeing the world....

194 citations


Cited by
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08 Sep 1978-Science

5,182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an approach to mobility that takes both historical mobilities and forms of immobility seriously is proposed, and it is argued that is important for the development of a politics of mobility.
Abstract: This paper proposes an approach to mobility that takes both historical mobilities and forms of immobility seriously. It is argued that is important for the development of a politics of mobility. To...

1,464 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Wesleyan’s philosophy faculty draws on multiple traditions of inquiry, offering a wide variety of perspectives and methods for addressing questions that are of basic importance to the human experience.
Abstract: Doing philosophy means reasoning about questions that are of basic importance to the human experience—questions like, What is a good life? What is reality? How are knowledge and understanding possible? What should we believe? What norms should govern our societies, our relationships, and our activities? Philosophers critically analyze ideas and practices that often are assumed without reflection. Wesleyan’s philosophy faculty draws on multiple traditions of inquiry, offering a wide variety of perspectives and methods for addressing these questions.

1,212 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Arnab et al. as mentioned in this paper describe non-representational theory as an umbrella term for diverse work that seeks better to cope with our self-evidently more-than-human, morethan-textual, multisensual worlds.
Abstract: © 2005 Edward Arnold (Publishers) Ltd 10.1191/0309132505ph531pr I Parameters, definitions and themes This is the first of three reports I will write covering an emergent area of research in cultural geography and its cognate fields. During recent years, ‘non-representational theory’ has become as an umbrella term for diverse work that seeks better to cope with our self-evidently more-than-human, more-than-textual, multisensual worlds. In as much as nonrepresentational work allows it, these reports will sketch out common themes of interest, and assess impacts, critics and potentials, variously conceptual, methodological and empirical. Of late, non-representational theorists have asked difficult and provocative questions of cultural geographers, and many others in the discipline, about what is intended by the conduct of research (Thrift and Dewsbury, 2000). What has been identified as deadening effect – the tendency for cultural analyses to cleave towards a conservative, categorical politics of identity and textual meaning – can, it is contended, be overcome by allowing in much more of the excessive and transient aspects of living. Given the scope and force of the original non-representational arguments, it is unsurprising that this theory has been subject to fulsome response. In fact, non-representational theory has become a particularly effective lightning-rod for disciplinary self-critique. Commentaries have emerged from within cultural, feminist and Marxian traditions and the more recent coalition of critical geography. Notably, and anecdotally, some of the most colourful observations have been saved for bi-partisan conversation in the conference or common room. It is important (not to say appropriate) that the nature of the dialogue – variously confrontational, tribal, dogmatic, peevish and full-bodied – goes on record early. Published versions have been concerned predominantly with the theoretical conditions for disciplinary succession or progression that the term ‘non-representational’ would seem to imply and how, in relation, the concept of performance should be understood by geographers. These articles are variously structured as manifesto, critical review, restated challenge, revanchist programme and proposed reconciliation (Thrift, 1996; 1997; 2000; Nelson, 1999; Thrift and Dewsbury, 2000; Nash, 2000; Harrison, 2000; Gregson and Rose, 2000; Crouch, 2001; Dewsbury et al., 2002; Whatmore, 2002; Cresswell, 2002; Smith, 2003; Jacobs and Nash, 2003; Latham, 2003a; Castree and MacMillan, 2004).1 In this report, I would like to treat the flourishing theoretical debate as a significant Cultural geography: the busyness of being ‘more-than-representational’

1,026 citations