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Author

Jon Bridgman

Bio: Jon Bridgman is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 90 citations.
Topics: The Holocaust

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1981

72 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Bridgman, Jon as discussed by the authors, described the liberation of the death camps in detail, from July 1944 to May 1945, the Russian army liberated ten camps east of the Oder River; the Allied Forces liberated the western camps in April and May of 1945.
Abstract: Bridgman, Jon. The End of the Holocaust: The Liberation of the Camps. Portland, OR: Areopagitica Press, 1990. Print. Among the thousands of books that have examined various aspects of the Jewish Holocaust, surprisingly few have treated the nal days of the death camps in any detail. From July 1944 to May 1945, the Russian army liberated ten camps east of the Oder River; the Allied Forces liberated the ve western camps in April and May of 1945. The names—Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen, Dachau, Buchenwald —form the 20th century’s most horrifying litany.

16 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990

2 citations


Cited by
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MonographDOI
TL;DR: The argument of ethnic cleansing in former times is discussed in this article, where two versions of 'we, the people' are presented. But the argument is not applicable to the current world.
Abstract: 1. The argument 2. Ethnic cleansing in former times 3. Two versions of 'we, the people' 4. Genocidal democracies in the New World 5. Armenia, I: into the danger zone 6. Armenia, II: genocide 7. Nazis, I: radicalization 8. Nazis, II: fifteen hundred perpetrators 9. Nazis, III: genocidal careers 10. Germany's allies and auxiliaries 11. Communist cleansing: Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot 12. Yugoslavia, I: into the danger zone 13. Yugoslavia, II: murderous cleansing 14. Rwanda, I: into the danger zone 15. Rwanda, II: genocide 16. Counterfactual cases: India and Indonesia 17. Combating ethnic cleansing in the world today.

930 citations

Book
22 Sep 2009
TL;DR: In this article, Neta Crawford proposes a theory of argument in world politics which focuses on the role of ethical arguments in fostering changes in long-standing practices and offers a prescriptive analysis of how ethical arguments could be deployed to deal with the problem of humanitarian intervention.
Abstract: Arguments have consequences in world politics that are as real as the military forces of states or the balance of power among them. Neta Crawford proposes a theory of argument in world politics which focuses on the role of ethical arguments in fostering changes in long-standing practices. She examines five hundred years of history, analyzing the role of ethical arguments in colonialism, the abolition of slavery and forced labour, and decolonization. Pointing out that decolonization is the biggest change in world politics in the last five hundred years, the author examines ethical arguments from the sixteenth century justifying Spanish conquest of the Americas, and from the twentieth century over the fate of Southern Africa. The book also offers a prescriptive analysis of how ethical arguments could be deployed to deal with the problem of humanitarian intervention. Co-winner of the APSA Jervis-Schroeder Prize for the best book on international history and politics.

336 citations

Book
15 May 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe a climate of interventionist global neoliberal imperialism which increasingly manifests its violent character through the military invasion of Iraq, bombardment of Libya, imposition of sanctions on Zimbabwe and military involvement in the invasion of Afghanistan.
Abstract: This book has been written at a crucial time in global history in general and African history in particular. On the one hand, the history is dominated by a climate of interventionist global neoliberal imperialism which increasingly manifests its violent character through the military invasion of Iraq, bombardment of Libya, imposition of sanctions on Zimbabwe and military invasion of Afghanistan. Violent invasions of weaker countries by the United States of America (USA) and its North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) partners, are often justified as humanitarian interventions to introduce democracy and human rights, dethrone dictators, eradicate terrorism and restore order within those states characterized by United States as outposts of tyranny and part of ‘the axis of evil’. But the military interventions, rhetorically premised on the noble ‘right to protect’, seem to be selective and guided by the West’s permanent strategic interests rather than genuine global humanitarian concerns. On the other hand, there was the unexpected outbreak of popular uprisings in North Africa that have resulted in the collapse of dictatorial regimes in Tunisia and Egypt, and the aerial bombardment of Libya by NATO-led forces in support of an onslaught by disparate opposition groups that culminated in the overthrow of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s 42-year iron rule and his death. These new developments in global history have provoked animated debates with some scholars like David Harvey (2003, 2007) and Ellen Meiksin Wood (2003) raising issues of the spectre of ‘new imperialism’ that is involving new players from East and South-East Asia. Some left-leaning scholars have concluded that we are living in a new world of ‘universal capitalism in which capitalist imperatives are universal instruments of capitalist domination’. They see this development as a very recent phenomenon (Wood 2003: 127).

158 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argued that the German experience in Namibia was a crucial precursor to Nazi colonialism and genocide and that personal connections, literature, and public debates served as conduits for communicating colonialist and genocidal ideas and methods from the colony to Germany.
Abstract: The German terms Lebensraum and Konzentrationslager, both widely known because of their use by the Nazis, were not coined by the Hitler regime. These terms were minted many years earlier in reference to German South West Africa, now Namibia, during the first decade of the twentieth century, when Germans colonized the land and committed genocide against the local Herero and Nama peoples. Later use of these borrowed words suggests an important question: did Wilhelmine colonization and genocide in Namibia influence Nazi plans to conquer and settle Eastern Europe, enslave and murder millions of Slavs and exterminate Gypsies and Jews? This article argues that the German experience in Namibia was a crucial precursor to Nazi colonialism and genocide and that personal connections, literature, and public debates served as conduits for communicating colonialist and genocidal ideas and methods from the colony to Germany.

141 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose a theoretical framework for realpolitik and loss in the context of human vulnerability and the need for unity and altruistic punishment, and discuss the possibility of revolt and punishment.
Abstract: Preface Part I. Introduction: 1. Preliminary considerations 2. Case selection Part II. Explaining Perpetrators: Theoretical Foundations: 3. Continuity and validation 4. Prologue to theory 5. A theoretical framework Part III. The Theory Applied: 6. Threat of numbers, realpolitik, and ethnic cleansing 7. Realpolitik and loss 8. The need for unity and altruistic punishment 9. Perpetrating states Part IV. Victim Vulnerability: Explaining Magnitude and Manner of Dying: 10. Raison d'etat, raison d'eglise 11. Cynical realpolitik and the unwanted 12. High victimization: the role of realpolitik 13. Inequality and absence of identification 14. On the possibility of revolt and altruistic punishment Part V. Exceptions: 15. A dog of different nature: the Cambodian Politicide 16. Dogs that didn't bark I: realpolitik and the absence of loss 17. Dogs that didn't bark II: affinity and vulnerability reduction Part VI. Conclusion: 18. Findings, consequences, and prevention.

138 citations