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Jon Fjeldså

Bio: Jon Fjeldså is an academic researcher from University of Copenhagen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Biodiversity & Endemism. The author has an hindex of 58, co-authored 238 publications receiving 12987 citations. Previous affiliations of Jon Fjeldså include Natural History Museum & American Museum of Natural History.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Erich D. Jarvis1, Siavash Mirarab2, Andre J. Aberer3, Bo Li4, Bo Li5, Bo Li6, Peter Houde7, Cai Li5, Cai Li6, Simon Y. W. Ho8, Brant C. Faircloth9, Benoit Nabholz, Jason T. Howard1, Alexander Suh10, Claudia C. Weber10, Rute R. da Fonseca11, Jianwen Li, Fang Zhang Zhang, Hui Li, Long Zhou, Nitish Narula7, Nitish Narula12, Liang Liu13, Ganesh Ganapathy1, Bastien Boussau, Shamsuzzoha Bayzid2, Volodymyr Zavidovych1, Sankar Subramanian14, Toni Gabaldón15, Salvador Capella-Gutierrez, Jaime Huerta-Cepas, Bhanu Rekepalli16, Bhanu Rekepalli17, Kasper Munch18, Mikkel H. Schierup18, Bent E. K. Lindow11, Wesley C. Warren19, David A. Ray, Richard E. Green20, Michael William Bruford21, Xiangjiang Zhan21, Xiangjiang Zhan22, Andrew Dixon, Shengbin Li4, Ning Li23, Yinhua Huang23, Elizabeth P. Derryberry24, Elizabeth P. Derryberry25, Mads F. Bertelsen26, Frederick H. Sheldon24, Robb T. Brumfield24, Claudio V. Mello27, Claudio V. Mello28, Peter V. Lovell28, Morgan Wirthlin28, Maria Paula Cruz Schneider27, Francisco Prosdocimi27, José Alfredo Samaniego11, Amhed Missael Vargas Velazquez11, Alonzo Alfaro-Núñez11, Paula F. Campos11, Bent O. Petersen29, Thomas Sicheritz-Pontén29, An Pas, Thomas L. Bailey, R. Paul Scofield30, Michael Bunce31, David M. Lambert14, Qi Zhou, Polina L. Perelman32, Amy C. Driskell33, Beth Shapiro20, Zijun Xiong, Yongli Zeng, Shiping Liu, Zhenyu Li, Binghang Liu, Kui Wu, Jin Xiao, Xiong Yinqi, Quiemei Zheng, Yong Zhang, Huanming Yang, Jian Wang, Linnéa Smeds10, Frank E. Rheindt34, Michael J. Braun35, Jon Fjeldså11, Ludovic Orlando11, F. Keith Barker6, Knud A. Jønsson6, Warren E. Johnson33, Klaus-Peter Koepfli33, Stephen J. O'Brien36, David Haussler, Oliver A. Ryder, Carsten Rahbek6, Eske Willerslev11, Gary R. Graves6, Gary R. Graves33, Travis C. Glenn13, John E. McCormack37, Dave Burt38, Hans Ellegren10, Per Alström, Scott V. Edwards39, Alexandros Stamatakis3, David P. Mindell40, Joel Cracraft6, Edward L. Braun41, Tandy Warnow2, Tandy Warnow42, Wang Jun, M. Thomas P. Gilbert31, M. Thomas P. Gilbert6, Guojie Zhang11, Guojie Zhang5 
12 Dec 2014-Science
TL;DR: A genome-scale phylogenetic analysis of 48 species representing all orders of Neoaves recovered a highly resolved tree that confirms previously controversial sister or close relationships and identifies the first divergence in Neoaves, two groups the authors named Passerea and Columbea.
Abstract: To better determine the history of modern birds, we performed a genome-scale phylogenetic analysis of 48 species representing all orders of Neoaves using phylogenomic methods created to handle genome-scale data. We recovered a highly resolved tree that confirms previously controversial sister or close relationships. We identified the first divergence in Neoaves, two groups we named Passerea and Columbea, representing independent lineages of diverse and convergently evolved land and water bird species. Among Passerea, we infer the common ancestor of core landbirds to have been an apex predator and confirm independent gains of vocal learning. Among Columbea, we identify pigeons and flamingoes as belonging to sister clades. Even with whole genomes, some of the earliest branches in Neoaves proved challenging to resolve, which was best explained by massive protein-coding sequence convergence and high levels of incomplete lineage sorting that occurred during a rapid radiation after the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction event about 66 million years ago.

1,624 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
04 Jan 2013-Science
TL;DR: A global map of zoogeographic regions is generated by combining data on the distributions and phylogenetic relationships of 21,037 species of amphibians, birds, and mammals, and it is shown that spatial turnover in the phylogenetic composition of vertebrate assemblages is higher in the Southern than in the Northern Hemisphere.
Abstract: Modern attempts to produce biogeographic maps focus on the distribution of species, and the maps are typically drawn without phylogenetic considerations. Here, we generate a global map of zoogeographic regions by combining data on the distributions and phylogenetic relationships of 21,037 species of amphibians, birds, and mammals. We identify 20 distinct zoogeographic regions, which are grouped into 11 larger realms. We document the lack of support for several regions previously defined based on distributional data and show that spatial turnover in the phylogenetic composition of vertebrate assemblages is higher in the Southern than in the Northern Hemisphere. We further show that the integration of phylogenetic information provides valuable insight on historical relationships among regions, permitting the identification of evolutionarily unique regions of the world.

1,014 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Guojie Zhang1, Guojie Zhang2, Cai Li2, Qiye Li2, Bo Li2, Denis M. Larkin3, Chul Hee Lee4, Jay F. Storz5, Agostinho Antunes6, Matthew J. Greenwold7, Robert W. Meredith8, Anders Ödeen9, Jie Cui10, Qi Zhou11, Luohao Xu2, Hailin Pan2, Zongji Wang12, Lijun Jin2, Pei Zhang2, Haofu Hu2, Wei Yang2, Jiang Hu2, Jin Xiao2, Zhikai Yang2, Yang Liu2, Qiaolin Xie2, Hao Yu2, Jinmin Lian2, Ping Wen2, Fang Zhang2, Hui Li2, Yongli Zeng2, Zijun Xiong2, Shiping Liu12, Long Zhou2, Zhiyong Huang2, Na An2, Jie Wang13, Qiumei Zheng2, Yingqi Xiong2, Guangbiao Wang2, Bo Wang2, Jingjing Wang2, Yu Fan14, Rute R. da Fonseca1, Alonzo Alfaro-Núñez1, Mikkel Schubert1, Ludovic Orlando1, Tobias Mourier1, Jason T. Howard15, Ganeshkumar Ganapathy15, Andreas R. Pfenning15, Osceola Whitney15, Miriam V. Rivas15, Erina Hara15, Julia Smith15, Marta Farré3, Jitendra Narayan16, Gancho T. Slavov16, Michael N Romanov17, Rui Borges6, João Paulo Machado6, Imran Khan6, Mark S. Springer18, John Gatesy18, Federico G. Hoffmann19, Juan C. Opazo20, Olle Håstad21, Roger H. Sawyer7, Heebal Kim4, Kyu-Won Kim4, Hyeon Jeong Kim4, Seoae Cho4, Ning Li22, Yinhua Huang22, Michael William Bruford23, Xiangjiang Zhan13, Andrew Dixon, Mads F. Bertelsen24, Elizabeth P. Derryberry25, Wesley C. Warren26, Richard K. Wilson26, Shengbin Li27, David A. Ray19, Richard E. Green28, Stephen J. O'Brien29, Darren K. Griffin17, Warren E. Johnson30, David Haussler28, Oliver A. Ryder, Eske Willerslev1, Gary R. Graves31, Per Alström21, Jon Fjeldså32, David P. Mindell33, Scott V. Edwards34, Edward L. Braun35, Carsten Rahbek32, David W. Burt36, Peter Houde37, Yong Zhang2, Huanming Yang38, Jian Wang2, Erich D. Jarvis15, M. Thomas P. Gilbert39, M. Thomas P. Gilbert1, Jun Wang 
12 Dec 2014-Science
TL;DR: This work explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades to reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits.
Abstract: Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits.

872 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A typology of monitoring categories, defined by their degree of local participation, is suggested, ranging from no local involvement with monitoring undertaken by professional researchers to an entirely local effort with monitoring undertook by local people, to help develop a protocol for monitoring in developing countries.
Abstract: The monitoring of trends in the status of species or habitats is routine in developed countries, where it is funded by the state or large nongovernmental organizations and often involves large numbers of skilled amateur volunteers. Far less monitoring of natural resources takes place in developing countries, where state agencies have small budgets, there are fewer skilled professionals or amateurs, and socioeconomic conditions prevent development of a culture of volunteerism. The resulting lack of knowledge about trends in species and habitats presents a serious challenge for detecting, understanding, and reversing declines in natural resource values. International environmental agreements require signatories undertake systematic monitoring of their natural resources, but no system exists to guide the development and expansion of monitoring schemes. To help develop such a protocol, we suggest a typology of monitoring categories, defined by their degree of local participation, ranging from no local involvement with monitoring undertaken by professional researchers to an entirely local effort with monitoring undertaken by local people. We assessed the strengths and weaknesses of each monitoring category and the potential of each to be sustainable in developed or developing countries. Locally based monitoring is particularly relevant in developing countries, where it can lead to rapid decisions

416 citations


Cited by
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28 Jul 2005
TL;DR: PfPMP1)与感染红细胞、树突状组胞以及胎盘的单个或多个受体作用,在黏附及免疫逃避中起关键的作�ly.
Abstract: 抗原变异可使得多种致病微生物易于逃避宿主免疫应答。表达在感染红细胞表面的恶性疟原虫红细胞表面蛋白1(PfPMP1)与感染红细胞、内皮细胞、树突状细胞以及胎盘的单个或多个受体作用,在黏附及免疫逃避中起关键的作用。每个单倍体基因组var基因家族编码约60种成员,通过启动转录不同的var基因变异体为抗原变异提供了分子基础。

18,940 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Preface to the Princeton Landmarks in Biology Edition vii Preface xi Symbols used xiii 1.
Abstract: Preface to the Princeton Landmarks in Biology Edition vii Preface xi Symbols Used xiii 1. The Importance of Islands 3 2. Area and Number of Speicies 8 3. Further Explanations of the Area-Diversity Pattern 19 4. The Strategy of Colonization 68 5. Invasibility and the Variable Niche 94 6. Stepping Stones and Biotic Exchange 123 7. Evolutionary Changes Following Colonization 145 8. Prospect 181 Glossary 185 References 193 Index 201

14,171 citations

Journal Article
Fumio Tajima1
30 Oct 1989-Genomics
TL;DR: It is suggested that the natural selection against large insertion/deletion is so weak that a large amount of variation is maintained in a population.

11,521 citations

Book
01 Jan 2009

8,216 citations