scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Jonathan Lee Simon

Bio: Jonathan Lee Simon is an academic researcher from VIT University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Structural load & Response spectrum. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 1 citations.

Papers
More filters
Book
01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: The Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-range Future at Boston University created a conference called Africa 2060: Good News from Africa as mentioned in this paper, which was the keystone event of a research program called “Africa 2060.
Abstract: This repository item contains a single issue of the Pardee Conference Series, As the keystone event of a research program called “Africa 2060,” the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future at Boston University convened a conference on April 16, 2010 called Africa 2060: Good News from Africa. The program featured more than a dozen expert panelists from Boston University and across the world, and the approximately 100 participants included many African scholars and citizens from the continent who contributed to lively and well-informed discussion. The Pardee Center conference was co-sponsored by Boston University’s Africa Studies Center (ASC), the African Presidential Archives & Research Center (APARC), and the Global Health & Development Center (GHDC).

1 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2021
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the seismic demand reduction for a chosen isolation scheme on a 10-storey hospital building which essentially lies in the descending portion of response spectrum, and the passive isolation scheme consists of spring and damper assembly connecting isolated floor to the building.
Abstract: Seismic protection of hospital buildings is at most important as they belong to lifeline structures. Proper definition of seismic demand is essential for earthquake protection of structural components. Generation of floor response spectra assumes significant in design and analysis of structural contents which require high seismic demand. Limiting the floor acceleration/drift is found to be difficult in most of the times in traditional lateral load resisting system and is period-sensitive in addition to ductility [1]. But decoupling the floor from the building using suitable isolation schemes found to reduce the floor accelerations and displacements [2]. The paper presents an investigation into the seismic demand reduction for a chosen isolation scheme on a 10-storey hospital building which essentially lies in the descending portion of response spectrum [3]. The passive isolation scheme consists of spring and damper assembly connecting isolated floor to the building. Nonlinear time history analysis has been carried out on both the floor isolated and non-isolated building subjected to an earthquake intensity of 0.3 g. Dynamic characteristics of the building were evaluated, and apparent dynamic magnification factors were found out which are useful for generation of floor response spectra. Seismic peak floor acceleration (PFA) is one of the significant parameters influencing performance of the building contents. In addition to PFA, spectral acceleration and displacements were selected as engineering demand parameters. Based on the acceleration and drift demands, suitable floor isolation system is suggested. With the chosen floor isolation scheme, seismic demand has been found to decrease imparting higher efficiency to the system. Accurate recommendation related to displacements and floor acceleration provisions are necessary for the efficient seismic protection design of non-structural elements.

Cited by
More filters
DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the case for a need to approach ideas and practices related to scaling more critically than is commonly done, and discuss concerns as well as opportunities for developing a practice of responsible scaling of innovations.
Abstract: The term scaling (up) has become increasingly popular over the past three decades in the context of development initiatives and related investment proposals. Such scaling (up) generally relates to innovations, which include (new) technologies, practices (and habits), policies (and wider institutions), and projects. The approach of scaling innovations is often presented as the instrument par excellence for addressing grand challenges in/for society, to the extent that it may be regarded as a core development paradigm or even ideology. This thesis presents the case for a need to approach ideas and practices related to scaling more critically than is commonly done. This includes a need to consider related complexities and potentially negative implications from a more holistic perspective. The thesis discusses concerns as well as opportunities for developing a practice of responsible scaling of innovations.

40 citations