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Author

Jonathan P. Bowen

Other affiliations: Southwest University
Bio: Jonathan P. Bowen is an academic researcher from London South Bank University. The author has contributed to research in topics: The arts & Digital ecosystem. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 24 publications receiving 62 citations. Previous affiliations of Jonathan P. Bowen include Southwest University.

Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: A major focus of the chapter is a review of smart city platforms and participatory-centric approaches and their potential translation to innovations across digital culture and smart city developments.
Abstract: A smart city is an urban area that broadly refers to a collective model in which technological advancements are used to enhance systemic capabilities aiming to enhance competitiveness, effectiveness, quality of life and sustainability. A major focus of the chapter is a review of smart city platforms and participatory-centric approaches and their potential translation to innovations across digital culture and smart city developments. The results provide a landscape view and further scope for identifying models of innovation and future opportunities in developing smart digital culture services and evolving directions, particularly within the museum sector.

18 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2012
TL;DR: The possibility of exploring and visualising links in arts fields through measuring the "collaborative distance" of a person away from Erd\H{o}s through links by co-author is proposed in this paper.
Abstract: Monitoring communities has become increasingly easy on the web as the number of visualisation tools and amount of data available about communities increase. It is possible to visualise connections on social and professional networks such as Facebook in the form of mathematical graphs. It is also possible to visualise connections between authors of papers. In particular, Microsoft Academic Search now has a large corpus of information on publications, together with author and citation information, that can be visualised in a number of ways. In mathematical circles, the concept of the "Erd\H{o}s number" has been introduced, in honour of the Hungarian mathematician Paul Erd\H{o}s, measuring the "collaborative distance" of a person away from Erd\H{o}s through links by co-author. Similar metrics have been proposed in other fields, including acting. The possibility of exploring and visualising such links in arts fields is proposed in this paper.

12 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter looks at the relationship between external digital life of museum goers with the internal museum environment aligned more with the pre-digital world than with contemporary culture.
Abstract: The distinguishing characteristic of digitalism is its focus on human behavior in cultural and social contexts. When we think of the developments of computer science and “information theory” that spawned the digital revolution, the focus generally defaults to digital tools and technology, as opposed to its effects on human life and culture and how advances in computing, digital communications and technology are transforming our ways of doing, seeing, knowing, learning, living and loving, to name a few examples. The impact of digitalism is all encompassing, touching all disciplines and human pursuits. How will museums change and transform themselves to connect in authentic ways with their communities while remaining relevant in a world transformed by digital culture that is moving full speed ahead, advancing in a state of constant change and development? While museums have been cautious and relatively slow to challenge traditional ways, they are surely noticing that we are reaching a digital tipping point of sorts that demands digital thinking and strategy to keep pace with evolving states of digital being, aesthetics, seeing and identity in world where everyone is connected to an all-encompassing digital ecosystem of shared networks and platforms. Although museums might argue that this shift to digital culture steeped in a user-centric model might be a costly one, not moving in this direction with a sense of timeliness becomes a far riskier strategy, being one that lacks consonance with museum audiences, and is out of synch with contemporary and digital life. This chapter looks at the relationship between external digital life of museum goers with the internal museum environment aligned more with the pre-digital world than with contemporary culture. How will museums recalibrate the gap between the visitors’ digital self and the museums physical identity? And, how will they revision the gallery experience for visitor learning, interaction, and participation? Will museums proceed fearlessly into digital life and art, embracing change, and the digital aesthetics and social milieu of the 21st century?

9 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: This chapter discusses possible directions that museums could take with respect to the rapidly developing digital culture in which they find themselves and speculate how museums could adapt to survive in the digital environment that is increasingly integrated as part of the real environment.
Abstract: We discuss possible directions that museums could take with respect to the rapidly developing digital culture in which they find themselves. Successful museums must be very adaptable to the changing nature of public expectations. Some of the important aspects to be considered have been covered in earlier chapters in this book. Here we take this knowledge and speculate how museums could adapt to survive in the digital environment that is increasingly integrated as part of the real environment, in what will rapidly become a postdigital world. The chapter summarizes the prospective directions for museums and related institutions in the context of changes in the digital landscape of the rest of society.

6 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the reaction of Italian state museums to the closure of their physical sites caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, taking the perspective of their online activity on social media.

117 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: A review of different natural fiber reinforced polymer composite with its manufacturing processes and characterization especially coir and jute fiber is presented in this paper, where the authors deal with various natural fiber-reinforced polymer composite.
Abstract: The natural fiber-reinforced polymer composite is rapidly growing both in terms of their industrial applications and fundamental research. They are renewable, cheap, completely or partially recyclable and biodegradable. These composites are having low density and cost as well as satisfactory mechanical properties make them an attractive due to easy availability and renewability of raw materials. Natural fibers have been proven alternative to synthetic fiber in transportation such as automobiles, railway coaches and aerospace. Other applications include military, building, packaging, consumer products and construction industries for ceiling paneling, partition boards. This paper deals with review of different natural fibers reinforced polymer composite with its manufacturing processes and characterization especially coir and jute fiber.

113 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper queries the existing smart city surveillance systems to identify their key limitations and sources of frequently justified controversies and suggests that to bypass these, the value of mesh-technology should be explored and the mechanisms by means of which they might be involved in the co-design of smart city solutions and in urban decision-making are highlighted.

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a study was conducted in order to develop a digital innovation model based on the digital organizational culture, digital capability, and organizational readiness, where the organizational readiness plays a mediating role between the digital capabilities and digital innovation.
Abstract: This current study was conducted in order to develop a digital innovation model based on the digital organizational culture, digital capability, and organizational readiness. This study explores how the organizational readiness plays a mediating role between the digital capabilities and digital innovation and between the digital organizational culture and digital innovation. For data collection, the survey instrument was used to collect data from 227 SMEs of ICT industry in Pakistan. The findings have revealed a significant connection of the digital organizational culture and digital capabilities with the digital innovation. Second, the organizational readiness mediates between the digital capabilities, digital organizational culture, and digital innovation. The study has empirically confirmed how to flourish a mechanism of the digital innovation in the SMEs. Moreover, the findings suggest some substantial implications for the management by focusing on the digital capabilities and digital organizational culture as a fundamental predictor for the digital innovation via organizational readiness.

47 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The aim of the paper at hand is to discuss how digital transformations can improve citizens’ well-being in terms of cultural consumption possibilities, and highlights the main benefits and challenges of developing smart culture, with a focus on Citizens’Well-being.
Abstract: The aim of the paper at hand is to discuss how digital transformations can improve citizens’ well-being in terms of cultural consumption possibilities. Culture is traditionally inextricably connected to the life of a city. So far the digital revolution has improved virtually all areas of activity within cities, such as communication, transportation, distribution, healthcare, finance, education, and business. On a similar note, it is high time for culture to follow the same trend in order for citizens to benefit from improved cultural accessibility and inclusion. Without the latter, the cultural experience would be less accessible and/or more costly. First, we showcase local initiatives regarding cultural technology. We then analyze the main initiatives in terms of public policy aimed at improving accessibility and inclusion for memory institutions (galleries, libraries, archives and museums), as well as their implications. Further, we present the main achievements in terms of cultural digitization using as reference the European Digital Library, Europeana. We conclude by highlighting the main benefits and challenges of developing smart culture, with a focus on citizens’ well-being.

30 citations