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Jonathan W C Wong

Bio: Jonathan W C Wong is an academic researcher from Hong Kong Baptist University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Sludge & Food waste. The author has an hindex of 63, co-authored 278 publications receiving 12335 citations. Previous affiliations of Jonathan W C Wong include Nanjing Agricultural University & Murdoch University.


Papers
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TL;DR: Co-composting of pig manure with sawdust at a low initial C/N would require a composting longer than 63 days, and, the high salinity due to the large amount of pork manure would pose a potential inhibition on plant growth.

550 citations

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TL;DR: This review summarizes major acidogenic metabolic pathways and regulating strategies for enhancing VFAs recovery during acidogenic fermentation of FW.

434 citations

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TL;DR: The results suggest that Si-enhanced tolerance to Cd can be attributed not only toCd immobilization caused by silicate-induced pH rise in the soils but also to Si-mediated detoxification of Cd in the plants.

369 citations

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TL;DR: It is clearly shown that increases in trace metal concentrations in the soils were generally extensive and obvious in urban and orchard soils, less so in vegetable soils, whilst rural and forest soils were subjected to the least impact of anthropogenic sources of trace metals.

358 citations

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TL;DR: Co-composting of pig manure with sawdust was studied in order to characterize the organic transformation during the process, using both chemical and spectroscopic methods and indicated an increase in polycondensed structures and the presence of more stable organic matter in the mature compost.

345 citations


Cited by
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7,335 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the range of heavy metals, their occurrence and toxicity for plants, and their effects on the ecosystem is discussed, where the authors focus mainly on zinc, cadmium, copper, mercury, chromium, lead, arsenic, cobalt, nickel, manganese and iron.
Abstract: Metal contamination issues are becoming increasingly common in India and elsewhere, with many documented cases of metal toxicity in mining industries, foundries, smelters, coal-burning power plants and agriculture. Heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead, chromium and mercury are major environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. Heavy metal accumulation in soils is of concern in agricultural production due to the adverse effects on food safety and marketability, crop growth due to phytotoxicity, and environmental health of soil organisms. The influence of plants and their metabolic activities affects the geological and biological redistribution of heavy metals through pollution of the air, water and soil. This article details the range of heavy metals, their occurrence and toxicity for plants. Metal toxicity has high impact and relevance to plants and consequently it affects the ecosystem, where the plants form an integral component. Plants growing in metal-polluted sites exhibit altered metabolism, growth reduction, lower biomass production and metal accumulation. Various physiological and biochemical processes in plants are affected by metals. The contemporary investigations into toxicity and tolerance in metal-stressed plants are prompted by the growing metal pollution in the environment. A few metals, including copper, manganese, cobalt, zinc and chromium are, however, essential to plant metabolism in trace amounts. It is only when metals are present in bioavailable forms and at excessive levels, they have the potential to become toxic to plants. This review focuses mainly on zinc, cadmium, copper, mercury, chromium, lead, arsenic, cobalt, nickel, manganese and iron.

2,898 citations

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TL;DR: The biodegradation of PAHs has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and the rate can be enhanced by physical/chemical pretreatment of contaminated soil.

2,482 citations

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TL;DR: The basic concepts of the composting process and how manure characteristics can influence its performance are explained and a summary of those factors such as nitrogen losses, organic matter humification and compost maturity which affect the quality of composts produced by manure composting is presented.

1,795 citations

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TL;DR: Although all the evidence from research on green tea is very promising, future studies are necessary to fully understand its contributions to human health, and advise its regular consumption in Western diets, in which green tea consumption is nowadays limited and sporadic.
Abstract: Tea is the most consumed drink in the world after water. Green tea is a 'non-fermented' tea, and contains more catechins, than black tea or oolong tea. Catechins are in vitro and in vivo strong antioxidants. In addition, its content of certain minerals and vitamins increases the antioxidant potential of this type of tea. Since ancient times, green tea has been considered by the traditional Chinese medicine as a healthful beverage. Recent human studies suggest that green tea may contribute to a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease and some forms of cancer, as well as to the promotion of oral health and other physiological functions such as anti-hypertensive effect, body weight control, antibacterial and antivirasic activity, solar ultraviolet protection, bone mineral density increase, anti-fibrotic properties, and neuroprotective power. Increasing interest in its health benefits has led to the inclusion of green tea in the group of beverages with functional properties. However, although all the evidence from research on green tea is very promising, future studies are necessary to fully understand its contributions to human health, and advise its regular consumption in Western diets, in which green tea consumption is nowadays limited and sporadic.

1,732 citations