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Joop Koppenjan

Bio: Joop Koppenjan is an academic researcher from Erasmus University Rotterdam. The author has contributed to research in topics: Corporate governance & Public sector. The author has an hindex of 36, co-authored 127 publications receiving 7396 citations. Previous affiliations of Joop Koppenjan include Southern Cross University & Dalian University of Technology.


Papers
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Book
28 Apr 1997
TL;DR: This book presents a management Perspective on Policy Networks, a state of the art approach to network management, and three strategies for managing Networks in the Public Sector.
Abstract: Foreword - R A W Rhodes Introduction - W J M Kickert, E-H Klijn and J F M Koppenjan A Management Perspective on Policy Networks PART ONE: POLICY NETWORKS AND NETWORK MANAGEMENT: A STATE OF THE ART Policy Networks - E-H Klijn An Overview Public Management and Network Management - W J M Kickert and J F M Koppenjan An Overview PART TWO: NETWORK DYNAMICS AND MANAGEMENT The Dynamics of Closedness in Networks - L Schaap and M J W van Twist Managing Perceptions in Networks - C J A M Termeer and J F M Koppenjan Strategies and Games in Networks - E-H Klijn and G R Teisman Analyzing and Managing Dynamic Processes in Complex Networks Instruments for Network Management - J A de Bruijn and E F ten Heuvelhof Managing Implementation Processes in Complex Networks - L J O'Toole Jr, K I Hanf and P L Hupe Normative Notes - J A de Bruijn and A B Ringeling Perspectives on Networks PART THREE: CONCLUSION: STRATEGIES FOR NETWORK MANAGEMENT Managing Networks in the Public Sector - W J M Kickert, E-H Klijn and J F M Koppenjan Findings and Reflections

1,504 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the central concepts of a theory of networks and of network management are discussed, and the authors argue that government's special resources and its unique legitimacy as representative of the common Interest make it the outstanding candidate for fulfilling the role of network manager, a role which means arranging and facilitating interaction processes within networks In such a way that problems of under or non representation are properly addressed and interests are articulated and dealt with in an open, transparent and balanced manner.
Abstract: In this article we address the elaboration of the central concepts of a theory of networks and of network management. We suggest that the network approach builds on several theoretical traditions. After this we clarify the theoretical concepts and axioms of the policy network approach and argue that this framework has important explanatory power both on the level of strategic interaction processes as well as on the level of institutional relations. We argue that government's special resources and its unique legitimacy as representative of the common Interest make it the outstanding candidate for fulfilling the role of network manager, a role which means arranging and facilitating interaction processes within networks In such a way that problems of under or non representation are properly addressed and interests are articulated and dealt with in an open, transparent and balanced manner.

547 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyze the collective action problem from a policy network perspective, by explaining impasses and breakthroughs in decision-making processes from a cognitive, a social, and an institutional point of view.
Abstract: Policy makers in today's network society are increasingly confronted with complex and wicked policy problems that require collective action. This article analyzes such a collective action problem from a policy network perspective. By explaining impasses and breakthroughs in decision-making processes from a cognitive, a social, and an institutional point of view, the network perspective offers explanations for the presence and absence of collective action.

471 citations

Book
02 Aug 2004
Abstract: Find the secret to improve the quality of life by reading this managing uncertainties in networks public private controversies. This is a kind of book that you need now. Besides, it can be your favorite book to read after having this book. Do you ask why? Well, this is a book that has different characteristic with others. You may not need to know who the author is, how well-known the work is. As wise word, never judge the words from who speaks, but make the words as your good value to your life.

370 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identify governance practices that help or hinder the reconciliation of private sector participation in urban infrastructure projects with the objective to increase the sustainability of the urban environment, based on a review of literature.
Abstract: The speed and scale of urbanization provide serious challenges for governments all over the world with regard to the realization, maintenance, and operation of public urban infrastructures. These infrastructures are needed to keep up with living standards and to create conditions for sustainable development. The lack of public funds and the inefficiencies of public service provision have given rise to initiatives to stimulate private parties to invest their resources in public urban infrastructures. However, private sector participation creates a whole range of new challenges. The potential benefits are countered by concerns about the compatibility of the private sector‘s focus on short-term return on investment with the long-term perspective needed to realize sustainability targets. On the basis of a review of literature on experiences with private sector participation in urban infrastructure projects, this article identifies governance practices that help or hinder the reconciliation of private sector participation in urban infrastructure projects with the objective to increase the sustainability of the urban environment.

328 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors conduct a meta-analytical study of the existing literature on collaborative governance with the goal of elaborating a contingency model of collaborative governance and identify critical variables that will influence whether or not collaborative governance will produce successful collaboration.
Abstract: Over the past few decades, a new form of governance has emerged to replace adversarial and managerial modes of policy making and implementation. Collaborative governance, as it has come to be known, brings public and private stakeholders together in collective forums with public agencies to engage in consensus-oriented decision making. In this article, we conduct a meta-analytical study of the existing literature on collaborative governance with the goal of elaborating a contingency model of collaborative governance. After reviewing 137 cases of collaborative governance across a range of policy sectors, we identify critical variables that will influence whether or not this mode of governance will produce successful collaboration. These variables include the prior history of conflict or cooperation, the incentives for stakeholders to participate, power and resources imbalances, leadership, and institutional design. We also identify a series of factors that are crucial within the collaborative process itself. These factors include face-to-face dialogue, trust building, and the development of commitment and shared understanding. We found that a virtuous cycle of collaboration tends to develop when collaborative forums focus on ‘‘small wins’’ that deepen trust, commitment, and shared understanding. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of our contingency model for practitioners and for future research on collaborative governance. Over the last two decades, a new strategy of governing called ‘‘collaborative governance’’ has developed. This mode of governance brings multiple stakeholders together in common forums with public agencies to engage in consensus-oriented decision making. In this article, we conduct a meta-analytical study of the existing literature on collaborative governance with the goal of elaborating a general model of collaborative governance. The ultimate goal is to develop a contingency approach to collaboration that can highlight conditions under which collaborative governance will be more or less effective as an

4,401 citations

01 Jan 2012

3,692 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The term "governance" is popular but imprecise. It has at least six uses, referring to: the minimal state; corporate governance: the new public management; good governance; socio-cybernetic syste...
Abstract: The term ‘governance’ is popular but imprecise. It has at least six uses, referring to: the minimal state; corporate governance: the new public management; ‘good governance’; socio-cybernetic syste...

3,577 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, three basic models or forms of network governance are developed focusing on their distinct structural properties and the tensions inherent in each form are discussed, followed by the role that management may play in addressing these tensions.
Abstract: This article examines the governance of organizational networks and the impact of governance on network effectiveness. Three basic models, or forms, of network governance are developed focusing on their distinct structural properties. Propositions are formulated examining conditions for the effectiveness of each form. The tensions inherent in each form are then discussed, followed by the role that management may play in addressing these tensions. Finally, the evolution of governance is explored.

2,891 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them, and describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative.
Abstract: What makes organizations so similar? We contend that the engine of rationalization and bureaucratization has moved from the competitive marketplace to the state and the professions. Once a set of organizations emerges as a field, a paradox arises: rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them. We describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative—leading to this outcome. We then specify hypotheses about the impact of resource centralization and dependency, goal ambiguity and technical uncertainty, and professionalization and structuration on isomorphic change. Finally, we suggest implications for theories of organizations and social change.

2,134 citations