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Jorge Sa Silva

Bio: Jorge Sa Silva is an academic researcher from University of Coimbra. The author has contributed to research in topics: Wireless sensor network & The Internet. The author has an hindex of 31, co-authored 260 publications receiving 4435 citations. Previous affiliations of Jorge Sa Silva include Instituto Português de Oncologia Francisco Gentil & National Technical University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This survey analyzes existing protocols and mechanisms to secure communications in the IoT, as well as open research issues and analyzes the open challenges and strategies for future research work in the area.
Abstract: The Internet of Things (IoT) introduces a vision of a future Internet where users, computing systems, and everyday objects possessing sensing and actuating capabilities cooperate with unprecedented convenience and economical benefits. As with the current Internet architecture, IP-based communication protocols will play a key role in enabling the ubiquitous connectivity of devices in the context of IoT applications. Such communication technologies are being developed in line with the constraints of the sensing platforms likely to be employed by IoT applications, forming a communications stack able to provide the required power—efficiency, reliability, and Internet connectivity. As security will be a fundamental enabling factor of most IoT applications, mechanisms must also be designed to protect communications enabled by such technologies. This survey analyzes existing protocols and mechanisms to secure communications in the IoT, as well as open research issues. We analyze how existing approaches ensure fundamental security requirements and protect communications on the IoT, together with the open challenges and strategies for future research work in the area. This is, as far as our knowledge goes, the first survey with such goals.

968 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Tracy A. Manuck1, Madeline Murguia Rice2, Jennifer L. Bailit3, William A. Grobman4, Uma M. Reddy5, Ronald J. Wapner6, John M. Thorp7, Steve N. Caritis8, Mona Prasad9, Alan T.N. Tita10, George R. Saade11, Yoram Sorokin12, Dwight J. Rouse13, Sean C. Blackwell14, Jorge E. Tolosa15, M.W. Varner, Kim Hill, A. Sowles, J. Postma, Shirley Alexander, G. Andersen, V. Scott, V. Morby, K. Jolley, J. Miller, B. Berg, M. Talucci, M. Zylfijaj, Z. Reid, R. Leed, J. Benson, S. Forester, C. Kitto, S. Davis, Marni J. Falk, C. Perez, Karen F. Dorman, J. Mitchell, E. Kaluta, K. Clark, K. Spicer, S. Timlin, K. Wilson, Kenneth J. Leveno, L. Moseley, Mark K. Santillan, J. Price, K. Buentipo, V. Bludau, T. Thomas, L. Fay, C. Melton, J. Kingsbery, R. Benezue, Hyagriv N. Simhan, M. Bickus, D. Fischer, T. Kamon, D. Deangelis, Brian M. Mercer, Cynthia Milluzzi, W. Dalton, T. Dotson, P. McDonald, C. Brezine, A. McGrail, C. Latimer, L. Guzzo, F. Johnson, L. Gerwig, S. Fyffe, D. Loux, S. Frantz, D. Cline, S. Wylie, Jay D. Iams, Martina Wallace, Allison Northen, J. Grant, C. Colquitt, D. Rouse13, William W. Andrews, G. Mallett, M. Ramos-Brinson, A. Roy, Larry Stein, P. Campbell, C. Collins, N. Jackson, Mara J. Dinsmoor, J. Senka, K. Paychek, Alan M. Peaceman, Joan Moss, Ashley Salazar, A. Acosta, Gary D.V. Hankins15, N. Hauff, L. Palmer, P. Lockhart, Deborah A. Driscoll, L. Wynn, C. Sudz, D. Dengate, C. Girard, S. Field, P. Breault, F. Smith, N. Annunziata, Donna Allard, Jorge Sa Silva, M. Gamage, J. Hunt, J. Tillinghast, N. Corcoran, M. Jimenez, Felecia Ortiz, P. Givens, B. Rech, C. Moran, M. Hutchinson, Z. Spears, Carlos Carreno, Brian R Heaps, G. Zamora, J. Seguin, Monica Rincon, J. Snyder, C. Farrar, E. Lairson, C. Bonino, W. Smith, K. Beach, S. Van Dyke, S. Butcher, Elizabeth Thom, Y. Zhao, Paula McGee, Valerija Momirova, R. Palugod, B. Reamer, M. Larsen, Tess Williams, T. Spangler, A. Lozitska, Catherine Y. Spong, S. Tolivaisa, J. P. Vandorsten 
TL;DR: The data show that there is a continuum of outcomes, with each additional week of gestation conferring survival benefit while reducing the length of initial hospitalization, and these contemporary data can be useful for patient counseling regarding preterm outcomes.

337 citations

Book ChapterDOI
04 Sep 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors presented a new wireless sensor network routing protocol based on the Ant Colony Optimization metaheuristic, which is studied by simulation for several Wireless Sensor Network scenarios and the results clearly show that it minimises communication load and maximises energy savings.
Abstract: Wireless Sensor Networks are characterized by having specific requirements such as limited energy availability, low memory and reduced processing power. On the other hand, these networks have enormous potential applicability, e.g., habitat monitoring, medical care, military surveillance or traffic control. Many protocols have been developed for Wireless Sensor Networks that try to overcome the constraints that characterize this type of networks. Ant-based routing protocols can add a significant contribution to assist in the maximisation of the network lifetime, but this is only possible by means of an adaptable and balanced algorithm that takes into account the Wireless Sensor Networks main restrictions. This paper presents a new Wireless Sensor Network routing protocol, which is based on the Ant Colony Optimization metaheuristic. The protocol was studied by simulation for several Wireless Sensor Network scenarios and the results clearly show that it minimises communication load and maximises energy savings.

323 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: TiO2 or ZnO nanoparticles are absent or their levels are too low to be tested under the stratum corneum in human viable epidermal layers, therefore, significant penetration towards the underlying keratinocytes is unlikely.
Abstract: Background: There is increasing concern over the local and systemic side effects of TiO2 and ZnO coated nanoparticles widely used in sun blockers. Objective:<

191 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This research presents a critical overview of the current taxonomic efforts in the area of Human-in-the-Loop CPSs, and a novel taxonomic exercise focused on the general roles of the human component together with a requirement analysis, are presented.
Abstract: Our tools and appliances are becoming increasingly more intelligent and interconnected, giving birth to an “Internet of Things” that can be used to support new types of cyber-physical systems (CPSs). While many CPSs are human-centric applications where humans are an essential part of the system, unfortunately, most of these systems still consider the human as an external and unpredictable element to the control loop. In order for these systems to better serve human needs, future CPSs will need to bolster a closer tie with the human element, through Human-in-the-Loop controls that take into consideration human intents, psychological states, emotions and actions inferred through sensory data. This area is a natural confluence of multidisciplinary focus but currently lacks a general understanding of the underlying requirements, principles and theory. As far as we know, this survey is the first effort towards extending the field's knowledge through an in-depth research of the state-of-the-art and a critical overview of the current taxonomic efforts in the area of Human-in-the-Loop CPSs. On top of this research, a novel taxonomic exercise focused on the general roles of the human component together with a requirement analysis, are presented.

183 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: These standards of care are intended to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payors, and other interested individuals with the components of diabetes care, treatment goals, and tools to evaluate the quality of care.
Abstract: XI. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING DIABETES CARE D iabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuing medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. Diabetes care is complex and requires that many issues, beyond glycemic control, be addressed. A large body of evidence exists that supports a range of interventions to improve diabetes outcomes. These standards of care are intended to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payors, and other interested individuals with the components of diabetes care, treatment goals, and tools to evaluate the quality of care. While individual preferences, comorbidities, and other patient factors may require modification of goals, targets that are desirable for most patients with diabetes are provided. These standards are not intended to preclude more extensive evaluation and management of the patient by other specialists as needed. For more detailed information, refer to Bode (Ed.): Medical Management of Type 1 Diabetes (1), Burant (Ed): Medical Management of Type 2 Diabetes (2), and Klingensmith (Ed): Intensive Diabetes Management (3). The recommendations included are diagnostic and therapeutic actions that are known or believed to favorably affect health outcomes of patients with diabetes. A grading system (Table 1), developed by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and modeled after existing methods, was utilized to clarify and codify the evidence that forms the basis for the recommendations. The level of evidence that supports each recommendation is listed after each recommendation using the letters A, B, C, or E.

9,618 citations

Journal Article

2,327 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is discussed, how blockchain, which is the underlying technology for bitcoin, can be a key enabler to solve many IoT security problems.

1,743 citations

01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide updates to IEEE 802.16's MIB for the MAC, PHY and asso-ciated management procedures in order to accommodate recent extensions to the standard.
Abstract: This document provides updates to IEEE Std 802.16's MIB for the MAC, PHY and asso- ciated management procedures in order to accommodate recent extensions to the standard.

1,481 citations