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Jörgen Svensson

Bio: Jörgen Svensson is an academic researcher from Umeå University. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 5 citations.
Topics: The Holocaust

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI

5 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Holmila and Silvennoinen as mentioned in this paper examined the ways in which the Holocaust has entered Finnish historiography over the last decades and argued that there are many contextual matters, such as the absence of visible anti-Semitism, which have for a long time worked as a sufficient barrier to keep Finland disconnected from the Holocaust.
Abstract: Since the end of the Cold War, most European nations – including those in Eastern Europe – have reassessed their role in the Holocaust. Although the Finnish scholarly community, as well as the wider public, is now beginning to participate in this process, Finland has been one of the last countries in Europe to recognize that it cannot assume a total immunity or innocence in this Europe-wide event. This article examines the ways in which the Holocaust has entered Finnish historiography over the last decades. Holmila and Silvennoinen's argument is two-fold. First, they hold that there are many contextual matters, such as the absence of visible anti-Semitism, which have for a long time worked as a sufficient barrier to keep Finland disconnected from the Holocaust. Second, they argue that there are important theoretical and methodological underpinnings, especially the so-called ‘separate war thesis’, which has been utilized as a convenient, if no longer tenable, explanation that Finland was very different fro...

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors reframes the question of whether Finland was victim, bystander, or perpetrator during the Nazis' genocide, by shedding light on a well-known episode in which Finland transferred eight foreign Jews to German control.
Abstract: A reconsideration of Finland’s relationship with the Holocaust is needed for two reasons. First, the country has recently witnessed a debate over its role in the Holocaust, stimulating new academic research. Second, the standard reference work on the subject, an article published in this journal in 1995 and subsequently condensed in Walter Laqueur and Judith Baumel’s Holocaust Encyclopedia , is outdated. By shedding light on a well-known episode in which Finland transferred eight foreign Jews to German control, the following article reframes the question of whether Finland was victim, bystander, or perpetrator during the Nazis’ genocide.

9 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: Although the end of the Cold War enabled the investigation of suppressed questions concerning collaboration, resistance and the impact of Nazism, until very recently, a general belief has prevailed that Finland was almost entirely free of antisemitism during World War II and before, and for this reason is exceptional as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Although the end of the Cold War enabled the investigation of suppressed questions concerning collaboration, resistance, and the impact of Nazism, until very recently, a general belief has prevailed that Finland was almost entirely free of antisemitism during World War II and before, and for this reason is exceptional.1 Historian Dan Stone duly points out that although the inquiry into a national mythology is “a potentially dangerous development breeding resentment and reopening old wounds, it also permits a more thoroughgoing critical treatment of the past than has hitherto been possible.”2 For Stone, antisemitism has been among the most neglected topics in Holocaust Studies because historians have taken it for granted that without a history of antisemitism the Holocaust would not have taken place.3 Yet as historian Klas-Goran Karlsson points out, “the old Cold War structures have been replaced by new or new-cum-old patterns of identity, developments and allegiances,” especially in Eastern Europe, where national and nationalist ideas confront demands for an international accounting for the past.4 Indeed, as social psychologist Florin Lobont, who has researched antisemitism and Holocaust denial in the former Soviet Bloc, explains, “Due to the deeply selective character of collective memory, and the distressing character of a negative past affecting the shaky self-image and self-identity of majority national communities, a proposed vision of the past that obliterates negative aspects is often eagerly welcomed.”5 Many of these countries see themselves as victims of Soviet imperialism, and so both admitting their participation in the Holocaust or taking the Holocaust as a unique, archetypal genocide would undermine their own self-victimization.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Simo Muir1
TL;DR: Finnish memory politics has long been invested in an exceptionalism that presents World War II Finland as a safe haven for Jewish refugees and for Finnish Jews themselves as discussed by the authors, and Finnish Jewry did perceive grave danger during the war, and geopolitical happenstance rather than deliberate policy alleviated it.
Abstract: Finnish memory politics has long been invested in an exceptionalism that presents World War II Finland as a safe haven for Jewish refugees and for Finnish Jews themselves. In fact, Finnish Jewry did perceive grave danger during the war, and geopolitical happenstance rather than deliberate policy alleviated it. The Jewish leadership was aware of the Holocaust and took precautions; when the Ryti-Ribbentrop Agreement strengthened Finland’s ties with Germany in June 1944, Jewish leaders formulated plans to evacuate Jews to Sweden. In the event, Germany’s worsening military situation allowed Finland to abandon cooperation with the Axis and the Jewish community to call off its plans. The author addresses the freighted silence surrounding this story, along with the complicated situation of Finnish Jewry in the war’s aftermath.

3 citations