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José M. Bernal

Bio: José M. Bernal is an academic researcher from University of Cantabria. The author has contributed to research in topics: Mitral valve & Tricuspid valve. The author has an hindex of 21, co-authored 66 publications receiving 1443 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Patients with failure of a tricuspid valve repair procedure requiring reoperation have a poor prognosis with a high mortality rate both in-hospital and in the long-term.

154 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In conclusion, bioprosthetic valve reoperation entailed a higher hospital mortality, particularly in the risk group of patients, and in the hands, surgical experience has determined the improvement of the clinical results in thisgroup of patients.
Abstract: During the 1970s, initial clinical experience with bioprostheses determined their worldwide use. However, bioprosthetic reoperation (BPR) is now common, particularly in groups with extensive implantation of these valve substitutes. From January 1980 to December 1989, a total of 470 patients had a total of 618 reoperations for bioprosthetic dysfunction and were retrospectively analyzed. Eighty-seven patients required a second BPR, 21 a third BPR, 5 a fourth BPR and 1 patient a fifth BPR. Structural deterioration was the main cause of valve dysfunction for the first and second BPR. However, paravalvular leak and infective endocarditis were more frequent for the remaining additional reoperations. Hospital mortality was 12.6%, 14.9% and 37% after the first, second and third or subsequent BPR, respectively. Univariate statistical analysis shows as hospital mortality risk factors: age at the time of the surgery, preoperative NYHA functional class IV, emergency surgery, concomitant tricuspid surgery, double (mitro-aortic) valve dysfunction, active infective endocarditis as the cause of failure and prolonged aortic cross-clamping time. Hospital mortality declined from 19.8% to 11.8% for the first and second half decade, respectively (P less than 0.005). In conclusion, bioprosthetic valve reoperation entailed a higher hospital mortality, particularly in the risk group of patients. In our hands, surgical experience has determined the improvement of the clinical results in this group of patients.

127 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Suppurative mediastinitis developed in 34 (0.9%) of 3,645 patients who underwent median sternotomy at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla in Santander, Spain, from 1985 through 1991, and mortality was 35%.
Abstract: Suppurative mediastinitis developed in 34 (0.9%) of 3,645 patients who underwent median sternotomy at the Hospital Marques de Valdecilla in Santander, Spain, from 1985 through 1991. These cases were analyzed in a case-control study designed to identify risk factors for poststernotomy mediastinitis. The significant risk factors were (1) preoperative factors: heavy cigarette smoking and history of endocarditis; (2) intraoperative factors: emergency surgery, prolonged duration of surgery, prolonged bypass pump time, ventricular failure, and tearing of the aortic or femoral artery; and (3) postoperative factors: reoperation, prolonged mechanical ventilation, prolonged stay in the intensive-care unit, and tracheostomy. All patients had abnormal sternal wounds (i.e., signs of wound infection or serous discharge). Twelve patients were bacteremic. Thirty-eight organisms were recovered from 31 patients with mediastinitis; 23 of the isolates were gram-positive and 15 were gram-negative. The infections were treated with extensive debridement and appropriate antibiotics. Mortality was 35%. Chronic sternal osteomyelitis was documented in two cases.

110 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Duke criteria proved to be more sensitive than the von Reyn criteria in prosthetic valve endocarditis, and the addition of 2 minor criteria (new-onset heart failure and presence of conduction disturbances) could improve the diagnostic sensitivity of the Duke criteria.
Abstract: Background Since publication of the Duke criteria for diagnosing endocarditis, several articles have confirmed their sensitivity when native and prosthetic valves are considered together. Objectives To compare the differences between the older von Reyn criteria and the Duke criteria in prosthetic valve endocarditis only, and to determine if the latter's sensitivity could be improved by adding 2 minor criteria: new-onset heart failure and presence of conduction disturbances. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 93 episodes of prosthetic valve endocarditis from January 1986 to January 1998 in a teaching hospital, and then analyzed the 76 surgically confirmed episodes to compare the differences between the von Reyn and Duke diagnostic criteria. Results The von Reyn criteria rejected the diagnosis in 16 of the confirmed episodes, compared with 1 diagnosis missed by the Duke criteria and 1 missed using our suggested modifications. Definite diagnosis (Duke) was established in 60 episodes, compared with a diagnosis of probable (von Reyn) in 36 episodes (P Conclusions As was the case with native valve endocarditis, the Duke criteria proved to be more sensitive than the von Reyn criteria in prosthetic valve endocarditis. The addition of 2 minor criteria (new-onset heart failure and presence of conduction disturbances) could improve the diagnostic sensitivity of the Duke criteria.

101 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The recognition of risk factors for postoperative infection in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgical procedures may contribute to improve their prognosis and to more organized surveillance and control activities in the hospital environment.

98 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The medical profession should play a central role in evaluating evidence related to drugs, devices, and procedures for detection, management, and prevention of disease.

4,050 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This document summarizes current knowledge about three-dimensional AIDS, congenital heart disease, cardiac device-related infective endocarditis, and cardiac implantable electronic device in the context of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
Abstract: 3D : three-dimensional AIDS : acquired immune deficiency syndrome b.i.d. : bis in die (twice daily) BCNIE : blood culture-negative infective endocarditis CDRIE : cardiac device-related infective endocarditis CHD : congenital heart disease CIED : cardiac implantable electronic device

3,510 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Anderson and Halperin proposed a new FAHA chair, named Jeffrey L. Anderson, MD, FACC, FAHA, Chair-Elect, Nancy M. Albert and Biykem Bozkurt.
Abstract: Jeffrey L. Anderson, MD, FACC, FAHA, Chair , Jonathan L. Halperin, MD, FACC, FAHA, Chair-Elect , Nancy M. Albert, PhD, CCNS, CCRN, FAHA, Biykem Bozkurt, MD, PhD, FACC, FAHA, Ralph G. Brindis, MD, MPH, MACC, Mark A. Creager, MD, FACC, FAHA[§§][1], Lesley H. Curtis, PhD, FAHA, David DeMets, PhD,

2,489 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The next generation of leaders in education and research will be shaped by the experiences of those who have gone before them and will help shape the future of the profession.
Abstract: Jeffrey L. Anderson, MD, FACC, FAHA, Chair , Jonathan L. Halperin, MD, FACC, FAHA, Chair-Elect , Nancy M. Albert, PhD, CCNS, CCRN, FAHA, Biykem Bozkurt, MD, PhD, FACC, FAHA, Ralph G. Brindis, MD, MPH, MACC, Mark A. Creager, MD, FACC, FAHA[§§][1], Lesley H. Curtis, PhD, FAHA, David DeMets, PhD,

2,331 citations