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Joseph Atakora

Bio: Joseph Atakora is an academic researcher from Women's College, Kolkata. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 3 citations.

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29 Apr 2021
TL;DR: Owusu et al. as mentioned in this paper examined the influence of peers, teachers and parents in the career aspiration of students in public Senior High Schools and found that teachers do not significantly influence the career aspirations of students.
Abstract: Aim: The study examined the influence of Peers, Teachers and Parents in the career aspiration of students in public Senior High Schools. Three research questions and three hypotheses framed the study. Study Design: Descriptive survey design was adopted for the study. One Hundred and Ninety Six (196) students, 30 teachers, and 50 parents were selected to respond to self designed questionnaires using stratified and simple random sampling techniques. Data collected were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The findings indicated that: Teachers do not significantly influence the career aspirations of students, Parental influence is a major determinant in the career aspirations of students, Peers influence the career aspirations of male and female students differently, the influence of peers on career aspirations of students does not vary on the basis of age and programme of study. Original Research Article Owusu et al.; JESBS, 34(2): 67-79, 2021; Article no.JESBS.67509

8 citations


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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyzed the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Career Aspiration Scale-Revised (CAS-R) and the effects of sociodemographic variables on the CAS-R.
Abstract: To help address educational inequalities in student backgrounds and career plans, the measurement of career aspirations can provide crucial information about inequality related to career opportunities. Therefore, this study analyzed the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Career Aspiration Scale-Revised (CAS-R) and the effects of sociodemographic variables on the CAS-R. The study participants were 590 undergraduates at three community colleges in rural Thailand. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to investigate the validity of the CAS-R three-factor model. The Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) model with and without differential item functioning (DIF) were applied to investigate the effects of sociodemographic factors as covariates on the CAS-R and specific item response. The CFA results supported the 18-item CAS-R’s three-factor structure because the items well represented latent factors and because the subscales met research standards for reliability and validity. The MIMIC model showed that only the year of study (first-year students) had a positive direct effect on leadership, achievement, and educational aspirations. The MIMIC model with DIF indicated that gender, year of study, major, and paternal education caused inequality in 10 items. Overall, the results show that the 18-item CAS-R has strong psychometric properties and can accurately assess the career aspirations of Thai students. The MIMIC model’s application allowed researchers to show that sociodemographic background affected the leadership, achievement, and education subscales. Obtaining information on the CAS-R scale’s measurements would be useful for researchers, practitioners, and career counselors interested in helping students develop career aspirations and choices.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a quantitative correlational research design was utilized to examine relationships between family, peer group, media and career decision-making among undergraduate students in Nigeria, and it was concluded that institutions and non-governmental organization should organize regular career guidance program, it will enable students to explore their interests and abilities at early stage of adolescence that may help them make wise and realistic career decision.
Abstract: This paper examines relationships between family, peer group, media and career decision making among undergraduate students in nigeria. A quantitative correlational research design was utilized. 1,200 undergraduates form the population while 373 constitute the sample size of the study. The instruments used are factors influencing undergraduate students' career decision making questionnaire with a reliability coefficient (α=.853) and career decision making self-efficacy short form questionnaire (α=.919). Structural equation modelling (sem) by using smart partial least squares (smart-pls 3.2.9) show that family and career decision making has highest significant path (t=3.828), (β=0.197) and (p=0.000) and the second highest significant path is media and career decision making (t=2.806), (β=0.129) and (p= 0.005) have significant relationship with career decision making at 0.05 level of significant. It was recommended that parents should support and endorse their children’s career choice and not to impose any career that is against their wishes. It was concluded that institutions and non-governmental organization should be organizing regular career guidance program, it will enable students to explore their interests and abilities at an early stage of adolescence that may help them make wise and realistic career decision.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors examined the predictors of psychology students' and early practitioners' intention to use two specific AI-enabled mental health tools based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology.
Abstract: BACKGROUND Despite growing efforts to develop user-friendly artificial intelligence (AI) applications for clinical care, their adoption remains limited because of the barriers at individual, organizational, and system levels. There is limited research on the intention to use AI systems in mental health care. OBJECTIVE This study aimed to address this gap by examining the predictors of psychology students' and early practitioners' intention to use 2 specific AI-enabled mental health tools based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. METHODS This cross-sectional study included 206 psychology students and psychotherapists in training to examine the predictors of their intention to use 2 AI-enabled mental health care tools. The first tool provides feedback to the psychotherapist on their adherence to motivational interviewing techniques. The second tool uses patient voice samples to derive mood scores that the therapists may use for treatment decisions. Participants were presented with graphic depictions of the tools' functioning mechanisms before measuring the variables of the extended Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. In total, 2 structural equation models (1 for each tool) were specified, which included direct and mediated paths for predicting tool use intentions. RESULTS Perceived usefulness and social influence had a positive effect on the intention to use the feedback tool (P<.001) and the treatment recommendation tool (perceived usefulness, P=.01 and social influence, P<.001). However, trust was unrelated to use intentions for both the tools. Moreover, perceived ease of use was unrelated (feedback tool) and even negatively related (treatment recommendation tool) to use intentions when considering all predictors (P=.004). In addition, a positive relationship between cognitive technology readiness (P=.02) and the intention to use the feedback tool and a negative relationship between AI anxiety and the intention to use the feedback tool (P=.001) and the treatment recommendation tool (P<.001) were observed. CONCLUSIONS The results shed light on the general and tool-dependent drivers of AI technology adoption in mental health care. Future research may explore the technological and user group characteristics that influence the adoption of AI-enabled tools in mental health care.