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Joseph F. Hair

Bio: Joseph F. Hair is an academic researcher from University of South Alabama. The author has contributed to research in topics: Structural equation modeling & Partial least squares regression. The author has an hindex of 76, co-authored 220 publications receiving 153001 citations. Previous affiliations of Joseph F. Hair include University of Kent & College of Business Administration.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1973
TL;DR: In this paper, a six-step framework for organizing and discussing multivariate data analysis techniques with flowcharts for each is presented, focusing on the use of each technique, rather than its mathematical derivation.
Abstract: Offers an applications-oriented approach to multivariate data analysis, focusing on the use of each technique, rather than its mathematical derivation. The text introduces a six-step framework for organizing and discussing techniques with flowcharts for each. Well-suited for the non-statistician, this applications-oriented introduction to multivariate analysis focuses on the fundamental concepts that affect the use of specific techniques rather than the mathematical derivation of the technique. Provides an overview of several techniques and approaches that are available to analysts today - e.g., data warehousing and data mining, neural networks and resampling/bootstrapping. Chapters are organized to provide a practical, logical progression of the phases of analysis and to group similar types of techniques applicable to most situations. Table of Contents 1. Introduction. I. PREPARING FOR A MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS. 2. Examining Your Data. 3. Factor Analysis. II. DEPENDENCE TECHNIQUES. 4. Multiple Regression. 5. Multiple Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression. 6. Multivariate Analysis of Variance. 7. Conjoint Analysis. 8. Canonical Correlation Analysis. III. INTERDEPENDENCE TECHNIQUES. 9. Cluster Analysis. 10. Multidimensional Scaling. IV. ADVANCED AND EMERGING TECHNIQUES. 11. Structural Equation Modeling. 12. Emerging Techniques in Multivariate Analysis. Appendix A: Applications of Multivariate Data Analysis. Index.

37,124 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This chapter discusses Structural Equation Modeling: An Introduction, and SEM: Confirmatory Factor Analysis, and Testing A Structural Model, which shows how the model can be modified for different data types.
Abstract: I Introduction 1 Introduction II Preparing For a MV Analysis 2 Examining Your Data 3 Factor Analysis III Dependence Techniques 4 Multiple Regression Analysis 5 Multiple Discriminate Analysis and Logistic Regression 6 Multivariate Analysis of Variance 7 Conjoint Analysis IV Interdependence Techniques 8 Cluster Analysis 9 Multidimensional Scaling and Correspondence Analysis V Moving Beyond the Basic Techniques 10 Structural Equation Modeling: Overview 10a Appendix -- SEM 11 CFA: Confirmatory Factor Analysis 11a Appendix -- CFA 12 SEM: Testing A Structural Model 12a Appendix -- SEM APPENDIX A Basic Stats

23,353 citations

Book
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Second Edition of this practical guide to partial least squares structural equation modeling is designed to be easily understood by those with limited statistical and mathematical training who want to pursue research opportunities in new ways.
Abstract: With applications using SmartPLS (www.smartpls.com)—the primary software used in partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM)—this practical guide provides concise instructions on how to use this evolving statistical technique to conduct research and obtain solutions. Featuring the latest research, new examples, and expanded discussions throughout, the Second Edition is designed to be easily understood by those with limited statistical and mathematical training who want to pursue research opportunities in new ways.

13,621 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors conclude that PLS-SEM path modeling, if appropriately applied, is indeed a "silver bullet" for estimating causal models in many theoretical models and empirical data situations.
Abstract: Structural equation modeling (SEM) has become a quasi-standard in marketing and management research when it comes to analyzing the cause-effect relations between latent constructs. For most researchers, SEM is equivalent to carrying out covariance-based SEM (CB-SEM). While marketing researchers have a basic understanding of CB-SEM, most of them are only barely familiar with the other useful approach to SEM-partial least squares SEM (PLS-SEM). The current paper reviews PLS-SEM and its algorithm, and provides an overview of when it can be most appropriately applied, indicating its potential and limitations for future research. The authors conclude that PLS-SEM path modeling, if appropriately applied, is indeed a "silver bullet" for estimating causal models in many theoretical models and empirical data situations.

11,624 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Second Edition of this practical guide to partial least squares structural equation modeling is designed to be easily understood by those with limited statistical and mathematical training who want to pursue research opportunities in new ways.
Abstract: With applications using SmartPLS (www.smartpls.com)—the primary software used in partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM)—this practical guide provides concise instructions on how to use this evolving statistical technique to conduct research and obtain solutions. Featuring the latest research, new examples, and expanded discussions throughout, the Second Edition is designed to be easily understood by those with limited statistical and mathematical training who want to pursue research opportunities in new ways.

13,621 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the heterotrait-monotrait ratio of correlations is used to assess discriminant validity in variance-based structural equation modeling. But it does not reliably detect the lack of validity in common research situations.
Abstract: Discriminant validity assessment has become a generally accepted prerequisite for analyzing relationships between latent variables. For variance-based structural equation modeling, such as partial least squares, the Fornell-Larcker criterion and the examination of cross-loadings are the dominant approaches for evaluating discriminant validity. By means of a simulation study, we show that these approaches do not reliably detect the lack of discriminant validity in common research situations. We therefore propose an alternative approach, based on the multitrait-multimethod matrix, to assess discriminant validity: the heterotrait-monotrait ratio of correlations. We demonstrate its superior performance by means of a Monte Carlo simulation study, in which we compare the new approach to the Fornell-Larcker criterion and the assessment of (partial) cross-loadings. Finally, we provide guidelines on how to handle discriminant validity issues in variance-based structural equation modeling.

12,855 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors conclude that PLS-SEM path modeling, if appropriately applied, is indeed a "silver bullet" for estimating causal models in many theoretical models and empirical data situations.
Abstract: Structural equation modeling (SEM) has become a quasi-standard in marketing and management research when it comes to analyzing the cause-effect relations between latent constructs. For most researchers, SEM is equivalent to carrying out covariance-based SEM (CB-SEM). While marketing researchers have a basic understanding of CB-SEM, most of them are only barely familiar with the other useful approach to SEM-partial least squares SEM (PLS-SEM). The current paper reviews PLS-SEM and its algorithm, and provides an overview of when it can be most appropriately applied, indicating its potential and limitations for future research. The authors conclude that PLS-SEM path modeling, if appropriately applied, is indeed a "silver bullet" for estimating causal models in many theoretical models and empirical data situations.

11,624 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors proposed a three-component model of organizational commitment, which integrates emotional attachment, identification with, and involvement in the organization, and the normative component refers to employees' feelings of obligation to remain with the organization.
Abstract: Organizational commitment has been conceptualized and measured in various ways. The two studies reported here were conducted to test aspects of a three-component model of commitment which integrates these various conceptualizations. The affective component of organizational commitment, proposed by the model, refers to employees' emotional attachment to, identification with, and involvement in, the organization. The continuance component refers to commitment based on the costs that employees associate with leaving the organization. Finally, the normative component refers to employees' feelings of obligation to remain with the organization. In Study 1, scales were developed to measure these components. Relationships among the components of commitment and with variables considered their antecedents were examined in Study 2. Results of a canonical correlation analysis suggested that, as predicted by the model, the affective and continuance components of organizational commitment are empirically distinguishable constructs with different correlates. The affective and normative components, although distinguishable, appear to be somewhat related. The importance of differentiating the components of commitment, both in research and practice, is discussed.

10,654 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the effect of the variance inflation factor (VIF) on the results of regression analyses, and found that threshold values of the VIF need to be evaluated in the context of several other factors that influence the variance of regression coefficients.
Abstract: The Variance Inflation Factor (VIF) and tolerance are both widely used measures of the degree of multi-collinearity of the ith independent variable with the other independent variables in a regression model. Unfortunately, several rules of thumb – most commonly the rule of 10 – associated with VIF are regarded by many practitioners as a sign of severe or serious multi-collinearity (this rule appears in both scholarly articles and advanced statistical textbooks). When VIF reaches these threshold values researchers often attempt to reduce the collinearity by eliminating one or more variables from their analysis; using Ridge Regression to analyze their data; or combining two or more independent variables into a single index. These techniques for curing problems associated with multi-collinearity can create problems more serious than those they solve. Because of this, we examine these rules of thumb and find that threshold values of the VIF (and tolerance) need to be evaluated in the context of several other factors that influence the variance of regression coefficients. Values of the VIF of 10, 20, 40, or even higher do not, by themselves, discount the results of regression analyses, call for the elimination of one or more independent variables from the analysis, suggest the use of ridge regression, or require combining of independent variable into a single index.

7,165 citations