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Joseph Jolton

Bio: Joseph Jolton is an academic researcher from Minneapolis College of Art and Design. The author has contributed to research in topics: Integrative medicine. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 131 citations.

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Carolyn Ee1, Sharmala Thuraisingam2, Marie Pirotta2, Simon D. French3  +773 moreInstitutions (146)
TL;DR: This work is presented at the I1 World Congress for Integrative Medicine & Health 2017 a global forum for exploring the future of comprehensive patient care in Washington, DC.
Abstract: I1 World Congress for Integrative Medicine & Health 2017 A global forum for exploring the future of comprehensive patient care Benno Brinkhaus, Torkel Falkenberg, Aviad Haramati, and Stefan N. Willich Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Department of Neurobiology Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Research Group Integrative Care, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; I C – The Integrative Care Science Center, Järna, Sweden; Department of Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; Department of Medicine, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2017, 17(Suppl 1):I1

133 citations


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TL;DR: Cardiorespiratory training and, to a lesser extent, mixed training reduce disability during or after usual stroke care; this could be mediated by improved mobility and balance.
Abstract: Stroke patients have impaired physical fitness and this may exacerbate their disability. It is not known whether improving physical fitness after stroke reduces disability. Objectives The primary aims were to establish whether physical fitness training reduces death, dependence and disability after stroke. The secondary aims included an investigation of the effects of fitness training on secondary outcome measures (including, physical fitness, mobility, physical function, health and quality of life, mood and the incidence of adverse events). Randomised controlled trials were included when an intervention represented a clear attempt to improve either muscle strength and/or cardiorespiratory fitness, and whose control groups comprised either usual care or a non-exercise intervention. A total of 12 trials were included in the review. No trials reported death and dependence data. Two small trials reporting disability showed no evidence of benefit. The remaining available secondary outcome data suggest that cardiorespiratory training improves walking ability (mobility). Observed benefits appear to be associated with specific or 'task-related' training.

708 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the amount of phenols and flavonoid compounds in these natural products, their antioxidant activities and the bonds present by FTIR was analyzed, which revealed the presence of active compounds in all drug samples.
Abstract: Natural products are used in wound healing in order to prevent infection. Propolis is a well known antimicrobial with phenolic compounds and flavonoid content which vary according to the propolis origin. Besides propolis (from both Brazilian and UK sources), pomegranate, dragon's blood and sage are possible antimicrobials to be used in biomaterials. The goal of this work was to analyze the amount of phenols and flavonoid compounds in these natural products, their antioxidant activities and the bonds present by FTIR. The FTIR analysis revealed the presence of active compounds in all drug samples. The phenols quantification showed that Brazilian propolis was rich in phenols compared to the other drugs, followed by pomegranate and UK propolis. UK propolis was the most rich in flavonoids, which is expected on account of its origin. Pomegranate, UK propolis and Dragon's blood presented the highest antioxidant activity. All samples presented antioxidant activity > 82%.

243 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Experimental studies of nerve stimulation are providing new information on the functional organization of the nervous system to control inflammation and its clinical implications in infectious and inflammatory disorders, which may allow the design of novel non-invasive techniques for nerve stimulation to help to control immune and organ functions.

92 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Pectin is a natural biopolymer derived from various plant sources and its activity is driven by functional groups and its affinity of pectin and chemical interactions of the active sites to chemicals in media determines fate of adjuvant molecules.

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
31 Jan 2019-PeerJ
TL;DR: This review describes the numerous manipulations of mangosteen extracted compounds in medicinal areas and highlights the current trend of its research, which will be important for future directed research and may allow researchers to tackle the next big challenge in mangOSTeen study: drug development and human applications.
Abstract: Background Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) fruit has a unique sweet-sour taste and is rich in beneficial compounds such as xanthones. Mangosteen originally been used in various folk medicines to treat diarrhea, wounds, and fever. More recently, it had been used as a major component in health supplement products for weight loss and for promoting general health. This is perhaps due to its known medicinal benefits, including as anti-oxidant and anti-inflammation. Interestingly, publications related to mangosteen have surged in recent years, suggesting its popularity and usefulness in research laboratories. However, there are still no updated reviews (up to 2018) in this booming research area, particularly on its metabolite composition and medicinal benefits. Method In this review, we have covered recent articles within the years of 2016 to 2018 which focus on several aspects including the latest findings on the compound composition of mangosteen fruit as well as its medicinal usages. Result Mangosteen has been vastly used in medicinal areas including in anti-cancer, anti-microbial, and anti-diabetes treatments. Furthermore, we have also described the benefits of mangosteen extract in protecting various human organs such as liver, skin, joint, eye, neuron, bowel, and cardiovascular tissues against disorders and diseases. Conclusion All in all, this review describes the numerous manipulations of mangosteen extracted compounds in medicinal areas and highlights the current trend of its research. This will be important for future directed research and may allow researchers to tackle the next big challenge in mangosteen study: drug development and human applications.

55 citations