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Judith E. Smith

Bio: Judith E. Smith is an academic researcher from University of Massachusetts Boston. The author has contributed to research in topics: Film studies & White supremacy. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 15 publications receiving 279 citations. Previous affiliations of Judith E. Smith include Temple University & University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1975
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a history of American cities in the Colonial Age, 1600-1776, 1800-1920, and the 20th century, 1970-1974.
Abstract: 1. Urban America in the Colonial Age, 1600-1776. 2. Commercialization and Urban Expansion in the New Nation, 1776-1860. 3. Life in the Walking City, 1820-1860. 4. Industrialization and the Transformation of Urban Space, 1850-1920. 5. Newcomers and the Urban Core, 1850-1920. 6. City Politics in the Era of Transformation. 7. Refashioning the Social and Physical Environment. 8. Cities in the Age of Metropolitanism, the 1920's and 1930s. 9. The Politics of Growth in the Era of Suburbanization, 1945-1974. 10. American Cities at the End of the Twentieth Century.

99 citations

Book
01 Sep 2004
TL;DR: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn as mentioned in this paper is a classic story about a working-class family in the early 1930s, and it was adapted for TV by Lillian Smith and Lola Hansberry.
Abstract: Acknowledgments Part 1. Ordinary Families, Popular Culture, and Popular Democracy, 1935-1945 Radio's Formula Drama Popular Theater and Popular Democracy Popular Democracy on the Radio Popular Democracy in Wartime: Multiethnic and Multiracial? Representing the Soldier The New World of the Home Front Soldiers as Veterans: Imagining the Postwar World Looking Back Stories Part 2. Making the Working-Class Family Ordinary: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn From Working-Class Daughter to Working-Class Writer Revising 1930s Radical Visions Remembering a Working-Class Past Instructing the Middle Class The Ethnic and Racial Boundaries of the Ordinary Making Womanhood Ordinary Hollywood Revises A Tree Grows in Brooklyn The Declining Appeal of Tree's Social Terrain Part 3. Home Front Harmony and Remembering Mama "Mama's Bank Account" and Other Ethnic Working-Class Fictions Remembering Mama on the Stage The Mother Next Door on Film, 1947-1948 Mama on CBS, 1949-1956 The Appeal of TV Mama's Ordinary Family "Trading Places" Stories Part 4. Loving Across Prewar Racial and Sexual Boundaries Lillian Smith and Strange Fruit Quality Reinstates the Color Line Strange Fruit as Failed Social Drama The Returning Negro Soldier, Interracial Romance, and Deep Are the Roots Interracial Male Homosociability in Home of the Brave Part 5. "Seeing Through" Jewishness Perception and Racial Boundaries in Focus Policing Racial and Gender Boundaries in The Brick Foxhole Recasting the Victim in Crossfire Deracializing Jewishness in Gentleman's Agreement Part 6. Hollywood Makes Race (In)Visible "A Great Step Forward": The Film Home of the Brave Lost Boundaries: Racial Indeterminacy as Whiteness Pinky: Racial Indeterminacy as Blackness Trading Places or No Way Out? Everyman Stories Part 7. Competing Postwar Representations of Universalism The "Truly Universal People": Richard Durham's Destination Freedom The Evolution of Arthur Miller's Ordinary Family Miller's Search for "the People," 1947-1948 The Creation of an Ordinary American Tragedy: Death of a Salesman The Rising Tide of Anticommunism Part 8. Marital Realism and Everyman Love Stories Marital Realism Before and After the Blacklist The Promise of Live Television Drama Paddy Chayefsky's Everyman Ethnicity Conservative and Corporate Constraints on Representing the Ordinary Filming Television's "Ordinary": Marty's Everyman Romance Part 9. Reracializing the Ordinary American Family: Raisin in the Sun Lorraine Hansberry's South Side Childhood Leaving Home, Stepping "Deliberately Against the Beat" The Freedom Family and the Black Left "I Am a Writer": Hansberry in Greenwich Village Raisin in the Sun: Hansberry's Conception, Audience Reception Frozen in the Frame: The Film of Raisin Visions of Belonging Notes Index

18 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: The tangled connections that have bound Jews to African Americans in popular culture and liberal politics are at the heart of Michael Rogin's arresting and unnerving new book as discussed by the authors, which explores blackface in Hollywood films as an aperture to broader issues: the nature of white identity in America, the role of race in transforming immigrants into "Americans", and the social importance of popular culture.
Abstract: The tangled connections that have bound Jews to African Americans in popular culture and liberal politics are at the heart of Michael Rogin's arresting and unnerving new book. Looking at films from "Birth of a Nation" to "Forrest Gump", Rogin explores blackface in Hollywood films as an aperture to broader issues: the nature of "white" identity in America, the role of race in transforming immigrants into "Americans", and the social importance of popular culture. From their very beginnings, Rogin claims, motion pictures created a national culture by taking possession of African Americans. Immigrant Jews inherited the blackface role in vaudeville, Tin Pan Alley, and Hollywood, and blackface, either literal or figurative, became a rite of passage to "white" America. Rogin shows how blackface representations were ethnically inclusive and racially exclusionary, and he argues against those who reduce race to simply one more ethnic identity. Juxtaposing movies like the first talking picture, "The Jazz Singer", with such early civil rights movies as "Pinky" and "Gentleman's Agreement", he demonstrates how the blackface tradition infected even those films that he wished to repudiate it. Rogin discusses the common experiences of Jews and African Americans that made Jews key supporters in the fight for racial equality. But his book also looks at the Jewish stake in "whiteness", challenging us to confront the harsh truths behind the popularity of racial masquerade. Accompanied by over fifty compelling illustrations, Rogin's forcefully argued study illuminates the commercial, cultural, and social reach of mass entertainment.

328 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a continuation of and a complement to those published in the Urban History Yearbook 1974-91 and Urban History 1992-2002, and an index of towns on pp. 504-507.
Abstract: This bibliography is a continuation of and a complement to those published in the Urban History Yearbook 1974–91 and Urban History 1992–2002. The arrangement and format closely follows that of previous years. There is an index of towns on pp. 504–507. The list of abbreviations identifies only those periodicals from which articles cited this year have been taken.

294 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the rise of nativism directed at Asian and Latino immigrants to the United States in contemporary American society and reveals that a racial nativism has arisen which intertwines a new American racism with traditional hostility towards new immigrants in a variety of ways.
Abstract: This article examines the rise of nativism directed at Asian and Latino immigrants to the United States in contemporary American society. By focusing on the Los Angeles riots and other evidence of the rise of anti-immigrant feelings among the population, this study reveals that a racial nativism has arisen which intertwines a new American racism with traditional hostility towards new immigrants in a variety of ways. Both recent scholarship on race and John Higham's classic work on nativism are utilized to provide a conceptual framework for understanding our multiracial contemporary setting. Tellingly, this new racial nativism emerges from both sides of the political spectrum, and is evident in attempts to keep discussions of race focused on solely white/black national construction. Finally, the study explores how immigrants themselves have responded to these attacks by increasing naturalization rates and political activity, forming a newfound ambivalent Americanism

193 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: This form is used for documenting property groups relating to one or several historic contexts as well as other similar forms used in the past for documenting properties in similar contexts.
Abstract: This form is used for documenting property groups relating to one or several historic contexts. See instructions in National Register Bulletin How to Complete the Multiple Property Documentation Form (formerly 16B). Complete each item by entering the requested information. For additional space, use continuation sheets (Form 10-900-a). Use a typewriter, word processor, or computer to complete all items

172 citations

01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: This study seeks to complement Judith Leavitt's pioneering work on public health in Milwaukee by presenting a picture, not of the politics of health reform, but of the personal side of health in the city.
Abstract: WHAT LIES BENEATH; UNCOVERING THE HEALTH OF MILWAUKEE’S PEOPLE, 1880-1929 Brigitte M. Charaus, B.A., M.A. Marquette University, 2010 The true measure of a city's health is the health of its people. To truly understand how Milwaukee came to be known as the “healthiest city” in 1930, one must examine the health needs of common Milwaukeeans from 1880 to 1929. This study seeks to complement Judith Leavitt's pioneering work on public health in Milwaukee by presenting a picture, not of the politics of health reform, but of the personal side of health in the city. Through an extensive examination of records including, but not limited to, coroner's reports, hospital records, personal correspondence, newspapers, cemetery data, and institutional records, a picture of the overall health of the city's population emerges. These records speak of the urban environment and its effects on everyday people. Communicable diseases, tragic accidents, suicides, physical examinations, venereal diseases, housing problems, and occupational hazards are only a portion of the health story that Milwaukee created at the turn of the last century. While political and institutional histories are essential, the story told here focuses on the people of Milwaukee and their experiences. While the city would dramatically grow and change during the twentieth century, its people remained its most valuable asset. As a city initially defined by German, Polish, and Italian immigrants, today Milwaukee has significant Hispanic and Hmong communities. The immigrant groups have changed but the challenges of living in the urban environment remain the same. The health of the city as a whole, as well as of its everyday citizens, is a strong indicator of its general economic, social, and physical health. Sick citizens create a sick city, both on a biologic level and an economic level. By bettering their individual health, the health of the overall city improves. The lessons and challenges that Milwaukeeans faced in the early twentieth century provide insight and models for Milwaukeeans of the twenty-first century. While breweries will make Milwaukee famous, it is her citizenry that makes the city prosper.

155 citations