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Judith R. Baskin

Bio: Judith R. Baskin is an academic researcher from University of Oregon. The author has contributed to research in topics: Judaism & Jewish studies. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 41 publications receiving 291 citations. Previous affiliations of Judith R. Baskin include State University of New York System & Yale University.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: The authors The Image and Status of Women in Classical Rabbinic Judaism, Judith Romney Wegner Jewish Women in the Middle Ages, Judith R. Baskin Sephardi women in the Mediaeval and Early Modern Periods, Renee Levine Melammed Italian Jewish Women, Howard Adelman Prayers in Yiddish and the Religious World of Ashkenazic Women, Chava Weissler Emancipation Through Intermarriage? Wealthy Jewish Salon Women in Old Berlin, Deborah Hertz Engendering Liberal Jews - Jewish women in Victorian England, Michael Galchinsky Tradition
Abstract: Portrayals of Women in the Hebrew Bible, Susan Niditch Jewish Women in the Diaspora World of Late Antiquity, Ross S. Kraemer The Image and Status of Women in Classical Rabbinic Judaism, Judith Romney Wegner Jewish Women in the Middle Ages, Judith R. Baskin Sephardi Women in the Mediaeval and Early Modern Periods, Renee Levine Melammed Italian Jewish Women, Howard Adelman Prayers in Yiddish and the Religious World of Ashkenazic Women, Chava Weissler Emancipation Through Intermarriage? Wealthy Jewish Salon Women in Old Berlin, Deborah Hertz Engendering Liberal Jews - Jewish Women in Victorian England, Michael Galchinsky Tradition and Transition - Jewish Women in Imperial Germany, Marion A. Kaplan The Women Teachers of the Alliance Israelite Universelle, 1872-1940, Frances Malino East European Jewish Women in an Age of Transition, 1880-1930, Paula E. Hyman Daughters of the Nation - Between the Public and Private Spheres in Pre-State Israel, Deborah S. Bernstein Gender and the Immigrant Jewish Experience in the United States, Paula E. Hyman Spiritual Expressions - Jewish Women's Religious Lives in the United States in the 19th and 20th Centuries, Ellen M. Umansky.

73 citations

Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: Baskin this paper studied the role of women in the aggadic midrash, a collection of expansions of the biblical text, rabbinic ruminations, and homiletical discourses that constitutes the non-legal component of rabbinic literature.
Abstract: While most gender-based analyses of rabbinic Judaism concentrate on the status of women in the halakhah (the rabbinic legal tradition), Judith R. Baskin turns her attention to the construction of women in the aggadic midrash, a collection of expansions of the biblical text, rabbinic ruminations, and homiletical discourses that constitutes the non-legal component of rabbinic literature. Examining rabbinic convictions of female alterity, competing narratives of creation, and justifications of female disadvantages, as well as aggadic understandings of the ideal wife, the dilemma of infertility, and women among women and as individuals, she shows that rabbinic Judaism, a tradition formed by men for a male community, deeply valued the essential contributions of wives and mothers while also consciously constructing women as other and lesser than men. Recent feminist scholarship has illuminated many aspects of the significance of gender in biblical and halakhic texts but there has been little previous study of how aggadic literature portrays females and the feminine. Such representations, Baskin argues, often offer a more nuanced and complex view of women and their actual lives than the rigorous proscriptions of legal discourse.

62 citations

Book
02 Sep 2010
TL;DR: Baskin and Seeskin this paper discuss the early history of modern Israel and the Arab-Israeli conflict, and present a timeline of the development of the modern Jewish community.
Abstract: Introduction Judith R. Baskin and Kenneth Seeskin 1. The Hebrew Bible and the early history of Israel Marc Zvi Brettler 2. The Second Temple Period Alan F. Segal 3. The rabbinic movement Hayim Lapin 4. The Jewish experience in the Muslim world Norman A. Stillman 5. Jewish life in Western Christendom Robert Chazan 6. Jews and Judaism in early modern Europe Adam Shear 7. European Jewry: 1800-1933 Marsha L. Rozenblit 8. Jews and Judaism in the United States Pamela S. Nadell 9. The Shoah and its legacies Peter Hayes 10. The founding of modern Israel and the Arab-Israeli conflict Bernard Reich 11. The centrality of Talmud Michael S. Berger 12. Judaism as a religious system Harvey E. Goldberg 13. Jewish worship and liturgy Ruth Langer 14. Jewish private life: gender, marriage, and the lives of women Judith R. Baskin 15. Jewish philosophy Kenneth Seeskin 16. Jewish mysticism Hava Tirosh-Samuelson 17. Modern Jewish thought Leora Batnitzky 18. Contemporary forms of Judaism Dana Evan Kaplan 19. Jewish popular culture Jeffrey Shandler 20. Aspects of Israeli society Judith R Baskin 21. The futures of world Jewish communities Calvin Goldscheider Glossary Timeline.

14 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: A Companion to Women in the Ancient World as discussed by the authors is the first collection of readings to address the study of women in the ancient world while weaving textual, visual, and archaeological evidence into its approach.
Abstract: A Companion to Women in the Ancient World is the first interdisciplinary, methodologically based collection of readings to address the study of women in the ancient world while weaving textual, visual, and archaeological evidence into its approach. Prominent scholars tackle the myriad problems inherent in the interpretation of the evidence, and consider the biases and interpretive categories inherited from centuries of scholarship. Essays and case studies cover an unprecedented breadth of chronological and geographical range, genres, and themes.

174 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In their minds and actions, the Jews erected a boundary between themselves and the rest of humanity, the gentiles, but the boundary was always crossable and not always clearly marked as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Who was a Jew in antiquity? How was “Jewishness” defined? How did a non-Jew become a Jew, and how did a Jew become a non-Jew? In their minds and actions the Jews erected a boundary between themselves and the rest of humanity, the gentiles, but the boundary was always crossable and not always clearly marked. A gentile might associate with Jews and observe Jewish practices, or might “convert” to Judaism and become a proselyte. A Jew might avoid contact with Jews and cease to observe Jewish practices, or might deny Judaism outright and become an “apostate.” Or the boundary could be blurred through the marriage of a Jew with a gentile.

98 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was found that women who had never terminated a pregnancy, Spanish-speaking Latinas, and women who scored high on a religiosity scale were significantly more likely to refuse testing, but all of those factors were strongly mediated by the effects of ethnicity and acculturation.
Abstract: This paper presents data from the California maternal serum alpha fetoprotein (MSAFP) program in order to explore the effect and interaction of various factors, especially ethnicity, abortion history and attitudes, religion, and religiosity on MSAFP test decision. The intent is to describe which women are more likely to reject MSAFP screening and also to understand the reasons for refusal and the meanings associated with it. We obtained data on sociodemographics and reproductive history from 595 obstetrical patient charts; we conducted semistructured interviews with an additional 158 pregnant women who were European-American, English-speaking Latina, or Spanish-speaking Latina. All of the women had been offered screening within the context of California's MSAFP Program. We found that women who had never terminated a pregnancy, Spanish-speaking Latinas, and women who scored high on a religiosity scale were significantly more likely to refuse testing. However, we found that all of those factors were strongly mediated by the effects of ethnicity and acculturation, producing different patterns of association in different groups of women.

80 citations