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Author

Judith Stewart

Other affiliations: Norwich University
Bio: Judith Stewart is an academic researcher from Sheffield Hallam University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Value (mathematics) & Public participation. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 5 publications receiving 3 citations. Previous affiliations of Judith Stewart include Norwich University.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The History Train, an event that formed part of British Art Show 8 in Norwich in 2016 as discussed by the authors, was assessed against the criteria by which the funding was awarded and the degree to which it met Debord's (1983) logic of spectacle and the necessity of visibility over experience.
Abstract: Funding streams designed to enable wider participation with contemporary visual art often fail to meet their objectives. Faced with the need to show increased engagement in return for public funding, fear of failure has led many organisations to turn to what we describe as the ‘art-spectacle’: public artworks developed as a means of demonstrating public participation. What is the nature of the engagement when large crowds encounter an art-spectacle? When art-spectacles appropriate an existing cultural form and rebrand it as ‘art’, by what criteria can it be judged a success or failure? Our discussion centres on The History Train, an event that formed part of British Art Show 8 in Norwich in 2016. As it received funding to engage new audiences, we assess The History Train against the criteria by which the funding was awarded. We also look at the degree to which it met Debord’s (1983) logic of spectacle and the necessity of visibility over experience.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue for forms of texts that are more akin to speech: texts that forgo the authority of the word in favour of approaches that provide a space where uncertain and imperfectly formed ideas can be expressed and tested.
Abstract: In Middlemarch, George Eliot makes a claim for the superiority of writing over painting: ‘Language is a finer medium’, she has her character claim, because it is ‘[…] all the better for being vague’ (1871: 140). This is a perceived advantage that many artists would find it difficult to agree with as we find the use of text in both academia and in relationship to visual art to be anything but vague. On the contrary, language (and specifically writing) is the means by which hierarchies of power are established and reinforced and it is crucial in defining and conveying the meaning of images. For artists, this poses particular, well-rehearsed problems as we try to find a path between the ‘not-knowing’, the uncertainties of the visual and the authority of the written word. Rather than becoming trapped in the conventions of authoritative text, this article argues for a different way of writing in both academia and in the art world at large: one that reflects the processes of visual practice and thinking. Drawing on current experiments in collaborative writing, it argues for forms of texts that are more akin to speech: texts that forgo the authority of the word in favour of approaches that provide a space where uncertain and imperfectly formed ideas can be expressed and tested.

1 citations

Book ChapterDOI
28 Jul 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider the role of freelance artists to act as public face of the arts, to deliver their education program, to devise and manage community projects and to demonstrate to people how art can be relevant to their lives.
Abstract: Many arts organisations rely on freelance artists to act as their public face: to deliver their education programme, to devise and manage community projects and to demonstrate to people how art can be relevant to their lives. While this type of involvement in the arts might be beneficial for the participants, what does it do for the artists involved?

1 citations


Cited by
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Dissertation
16 Jul 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate the similarities and divergences that characterise practice in gallery education and youth work, and untangle the historic barriers and tensions that have affected relationships between practitioners, organisations and the youth and visual art sectors.
Abstract: This thesis interrogates partnership working between galleries and youth organisations involved in a four-year, Tate led programme called Circuit (2013-2017). This programme sought to build sustainable networks with youth organisations and services across England and Wales in order to ‘improve access and opportunities for harder to reach young people’ who may not otherwise engage with galleries and museums (Circuit, 2013a). Reflecting on the similarities and divergences that characterise practice in gallery education and youth work, this research untangles the historic barriers and tensions that have affected relationships between practitioners, organisations and the youth and visual art sectors. Mobilising Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical framework, galleries and youth organisations are conceptualised as part of distinct ‘fields’, and their particular traditions, customs and internal contests are analysed. An exploration of the fields’ development under successive governments and changing policy priorities reveals that art organisations benefit from a greater affordance of agency and autonomy than youth organisations, which contributes to the uneven power dynamics that often exist in these cross-sector alliances. Reports from engagement with sector events also highlight how concepts of art and creativity frequently deviate between the fields. Through an ethnographic approach to the research context, participant observations and interviews produce data about Circuit’s programmatic decisions, and its efforts to shift problematic habitual practices. A series of in-depth site studies illustrate different ways for organisations to work together, as well as the challenges of collaboration in pressured political and economic circumstances. Cross-site analysis allows for further deliberation on the compatibility of Circuit’s wider peer-led programme agenda with the comparative agenda and practice of youth organisations. The ambition for young people to continue an independent relationship with the galleries’ programmes is shown to be hindered by a number of sometimes-misrecognised factors that unintentionally alienate certain communities of young people, particularly from working class backgrounds. The final stage of the analysis studies the identity, attitudes and positions of various youth sector agents working and participating within Circuit, and the specific ‘capital’ they bring to the temporary programmatic field. In discussing the implications for practice and research, this thesis asks whether (beyond programmes such as Circuit) it would be possible to establish a permanent collaborative or cooperative field between the youth and gallery sectors. I argue that this would only happen if a range of systemic changes were made, such as the development of national and regional structures to support integrated practice sharing; deeper engagement with the meaning and repercussions of partnership working; a determination to work collaboratively to address social urgencies facing young people, and a fundamental commitment to shift pervasive inequalities in the visual art sector.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a School of Urban Interventions was established to test the impact of different development scenarios on a diversity of urban areas in Krasnoyarsk (Siberia, Russia).
Abstract: ABSTRACT The rapid growth of cities can compromise their heritage by: diluting the distinctive character of diverse urban areas, destroying historic sites and buildings, and interrupting evolutionary continuity. This paper presents an innovative approach to addressing these problems. Using collaborative experimentation, a School of Urban Interventions was established to test the impact of different development scenarios on a diversity of urban areas in Krasnoyarsk (Siberia, Russia). The School created affordable tools to enable a more gentle, iterative and gradual way of developing often fragile historic areas, allowing hypotheses and design solutions to be examined before permanent changes were made. This collaborative experimentation approach helps participants to find shared collective values in the course of working with territory through negotiation, through participatory methods and grounded initiatives, helping to inform urban and architectural practices and therefore shape the cities’ heritage futures. The approach can also restore broken ties between the city and its inhabitants, empowering young professionals and creating active citizens while revealing hidden cultural potential. Being co-organised by the local university, this project also helped educate students to become activists and involved the university in urban life.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The History Train, an event that formed part of British Art Show 8 in Norwich in 2016 as discussed by the authors, was assessed against the criteria by which the funding was awarded and the degree to which it met Debord's (1983) logic of spectacle and the necessity of visibility over experience.
Abstract: Funding streams designed to enable wider participation with contemporary visual art often fail to meet their objectives. Faced with the need to show increased engagement in return for public funding, fear of failure has led many organisations to turn to what we describe as the ‘art-spectacle’: public artworks developed as a means of demonstrating public participation. What is the nature of the engagement when large crowds encounter an art-spectacle? When art-spectacles appropriate an existing cultural form and rebrand it as ‘art’, by what criteria can it be judged a success or failure? Our discussion centres on The History Train, an event that formed part of British Art Show 8 in Norwich in 2016. As it received funding to engage new audiences, we assess The History Train against the criteria by which the funding was awarded. We also look at the degree to which it met Debord’s (1983) logic of spectacle and the necessity of visibility over experience.

2 citations

Book ChapterDOI
08 Dec 2022
TL;DR: The authors explored how academic researchers have understood the concept of failure and the relationship between failure and learning, highlighting that the fields of business and entrepreneurship have undertaken the most work to understand the opportunities that learning from failure can afford.
Abstract: Abstract This chapter explores how academic researchers have understood the concept of failure. The chapter focuses on public policy literature to develop an understanding of the relational and contextual nature of success and failure. After a brief discussion on what we can understand by cultural policy and who has a role in its inception and delivery, this chapter considers the ways in which academics have attempted to define what policy failure constitutes and how we might identify its occurrence. This chapter also reflects upon the relationship between failure and learning. Here, we highlight that the fields of business and entrepreneurship have undertaken the most work to understand the opportunities that learning from failure can afford.